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Marcus Stroman
Marcus Earl Stroman (born May 1, 1991) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
of Major League Baseball (MLB)
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Opening Day
Opening Day
Opening Day
is the day on which professional baseball leagues begin their regular season. For Major League Baseball
Baseball
and most of the minor leagues, this day typically falls during the first week of April. For baseball fans, Opening Day
Opening Day
serves as a symbol of rebirth; writer Thomas Boswell once penned a book titled, Why Time Begins on Opening Day.[1] Many feel that the occasion represents a newness or a chance to forget last season, in that all 30 of the major league clubs and their millions of fans begin with 0–0 records.[1] Opening Day
Opening Day
festivities extend throughout the sport of baseball, from hundreds of Minor League Baseball
Baseball
franchises to college, high school, and youth leagues in North America and beyond
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Caleb Joseph
Caleb Martin Joseph (born June 18, 1986) is an American professional baseball catcher for the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut in 2014. In 2016, Joseph set the all-time major league records for at bats (132) and plate appearances (141) without an RBI in a single season.Contents1 Career1.1 High school and college 1.2 Minor leagues 1.3 Baltimore Orioles2 Personal 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] High school and college[edit] Joseph attended Franklin High School in Franklin, Tennessee, where he played for the high school baseball team
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Buffalo Bisons
Coca-Cola Field
Coca-Cola Field
(1988–present)Dunn Tire Park (1998–2008) North AmeriCare Park (1995–1998) Pilot Field (1988–1994)Previous parksWar Memorial Stadium (1961–1970, 1979–1987) Hyde Park Stadium (1967–1968) Offermann Stadium (1924–1960) Buffalo Baseball Park (1889–1923) Olympic Park (1884–1888) Riverside Park (1879–1883)Owner(s)/ Operator(s)Bob Rich Jr.Manager Bobby Meacham[1]General Manager Michael BuczkowskiMedia Spectrum Sports WWKB Bisons Radio NetworkThe Buffalo Bisons
Buffalo Bisons
are a professional Minor League Baseball
Minor League Baseball
team based in Buffalo, New York. They play in the International League
International League
(IL) and are the Triple-A affiliate of the Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays
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Brandon Morrow
Brandon John Morrow (born July 26, 1984) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB). He previously played for the Seattle Mariners, Toronto Blue Jays, San Diego Padres and Los Angeles Dodgers. On August 8, 2010, Morrow pitched a complete game one-hitter with 17 strikeouts, coming within one out of a no-hitter
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Kansas City Royals
The Kansas City Royals
Kansas City Royals
are an American professional baseball team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Royals compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member team of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division
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Detroit Tigers
The Detroit
Detroit
Tigers are an American professional baseball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers compete in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division. One of the AL's eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Detroit
Detroit
in 1901. They are the oldest continuous one-name, one-city franchise in the AL.[4] The Tigers have won four World Series
World Series
championships (1935, 1945, 1968, and 1984), 11 AL pennants (1907, 1908, 1909, 1934, 1935, 1940, 1945, 1968, 1984, 2006, 2012), and four AL Central division championships (2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014)
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Complete Game
In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game without the benefit of a relief pitcher.[1] A pitcher who meets this criterion will be credited with a complete game regardless of the number of innings played - pitchers who throw an entire official game that is shortened by rain will still be credited with a complete game, while starting pitchers who are relieved in extra innings after throwing nine or more innings will not be credited with a complete game. A starting pitcher who is replaced by a pinch hitter in the final half inning of a game will still be credited with a complete game. The frequency of complete games has evolved since the early days of baseball. The complete game was essentially an expectation in the early 20th century and pitchers completed almost all of the games they started
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Shutout (baseball)
In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO[1]), also known as a complete-game shutout,[2] refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run. If two or more pitchers combine to complete this act, no pitcher is awarded a shutout, although the team itself can be said to have "shutout" the opposing team. The ultimate single achievement among pitchers is a perfect game, which has been accomplished 23 times in over 135 years, most recently by Félix Hernández of the Seattle Mariners on August 15, 2012. By definition, a perfect game is counted as a shutout. A no-hitter completed by one pitcher is also a shutout unless the opposing team manages to score through a series of errors, base on balls, catcher's interferences, dropped third strikes, or hit batsmen. The all-time career leader in shutouts is Walter Johnson, who pitched for the Washington Senators from 1907–1927
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Chicago Cubs
The Chicago
Chicago
Cubs are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the National League
National League
(NL) Central division. The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side. The Cubs are one of two major league teams in Chicago; the other, the Chicago
Chicago
White Sox, is a member of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division. The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, was a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago
Chicago
Cubs in 1903.[2] The Cubs have appeared in a total of eleven World Series
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Baltimore Orioles
The Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Orioles compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) East division. As one of the AL's original eight charter franchises when the league was established in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers before moving to St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St
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Starting Pitcher
In baseball (hardball or softball), a starting pitcher or starter is the first pitcher in the game for each team. A pitcher is credited with a game started if they throw the first pitch to the opponent's first batter of a game. A pitcher who enters the game after the first pitch of the game is a relief pitcher. Starting pitchers are expected to pitch for a significant portion of the game, although their ability to do this depends on many factors, including effectiveness, stamina, health, and strategy. A starting pitcher in professional baseball usually rests three, four, or five days after pitching a game before pitching another. Therefore, most professional baseball teams have four, five or six starting pitchers on their rosters. These pitchers, and the sequence in which they pitch, is known as the rotation
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Save (baseball)
In baseball, a save (abbreviated SV or S) is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under certain prescribed circumstances, described below. The number of saves, or percentage of save opportunities successfully converted, is an oft-cited statistic of relief pitchers, particularly those in the closer role. It became an official Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) statistic in 1969.[1] Mariano Rivera is MLB's all-time leader in regular season saves with 652.Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 Value 4 Leaders in Major League Baseball4.1 Saves4.1.1 Most saves in a career 4.1.2 Most in a single season 4.1.3 Most consecutive4.2 Blown saves4.2.1 Career 4.2.2 Single season5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The term save was being used as far back as 1952.[2] Executives Jim Toomey of the St
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Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
(/ˈtwɪtər/) is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled for all languages except Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.[11] Registered users can post tweets, but those who are unregistered can only read them. Users access Twitter
Twitter
through its website interface, through Short Message Service
Short Message Service
(SMS) or mobile-device application software ("app").[12] Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[13] Twitter
Twitter
was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone, and Evan Williams and launched in July of that year. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity
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Spring Training
In Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB), spring training is a series of practices and exhibition games preceding the start of the regular season. Spring training
Spring training
allows new players to try out for roster and position spots, and gives existing players practice time prior to competitive play. Spring training
Spring training
has always attracted fan attention, drawing crowds who travel to the warmer climates to enjoy the weather and watch their favorite teams play, and spring training usually coincides with spring break for many US college students. Spring training
Spring training
typically starts in mid-February and continues until just before Opening Day
Opening Day
of the regular season, traditionally the first week of April. In some years, teams not scheduled to play on Opening Day will play spring training games that day
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Anterior Cruciate Ligament
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) in the human knee. The two ligaments are also called cruciform ligaments, as they are arranged in a crossed formation. In the quadruped stifle joint (analogous to the knee), based on its anatomical position, it is also referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament.[1] The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the four main ligaments of the knee, providing 85% of the restraining force to anterior tibial displacement at 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion.[2]Contents1 Structure 2 Purpose 3 Clinical significance3.1 Injury 3.2 Non-operative treatment of the ACL3.2.1 ACL injuries in Women4 Additional images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit] The ACL originates from deep within the notch of the distal femur. Its proximal fibers fan out along the medial wall of the lateral femoral condyle
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