HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Marcus Licinius Crassus
Marcus Licinius Crassus
Marcus Licinius Crassus
(/ˈkræsəs/;[2] c. 115–53 BC) was a Roman general and politician who played a key role in the transformation of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
into the Roman Empire. Crassus began his public career as a military commander under Lucius Cornelius Sulla
Sulla
during his civil war. Following Sulla's assumption of the dictatorship, Crassus amassed an enormous fortune through real estate speculation. Crassus rose to political prominence following his victory over the slave revolt led by Spartacus, sharing the consulship with his rival Pompey
Pompey
the Great. A political and financial patron of Julius Caesar, Crassus joined Caesar and Pompey
Pompey
in the unofficial political alliance known as the First Triumvirate. Together the three men dominated the Roman political system
[...More...]

"Marcus Licinius Crassus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proscription
Proscription
Proscription
(Latin: proscriptio) is, in current usage, a "decree of condemnation to death or banishment" (OED) and can be used in a political context to refer to state-approved murder or banishment. The term originated in Ancient Rome, where it included public identification and official condemnation of declared enemies of the state.[1] It has been used broadly since to describe similar governmental and political actions, with varying degrees of nuance, including the en masse suppression of ideologies and elimination of political rivals or personal enemies
[...More...]

"Proscription" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

General
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
[...More...]

"General" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucius Cornelius Cinna
Lucius Cornelius Cinna[1] (died 84 BC) was a four-time consul of the Roman Republic, serving four consecutive terms from 87 to 84 BC, and a member of the ancient Roman Cinna family of the Cornelii gens. Cinna's influence in Rome
Rome
exacerbated the tensions which existed between Gaius Marius
Gaius Marius
and Lucius Cornelius Sulla. After the death of Marius, he became the leading power in Rome
Rome
until his own death. His main impact upon Roman politics was his ability to veil his tyranny and make it appear that he was working under a constitutional government
[...More...]

"Lucius Cornelius Cinna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucius Licinius Crassus
Lucius Licinius Crassus
Lucius Licinius Crassus
(140 BC – 91 BC), sometimes referred to simply as Crassus Orator, was a Roman consul
Roman consul
and statesman. He was considered the greatest orator of his day, most notably by his pupil Cicero. Crassus is also famous as one of the main characters in Cicero's work De Oratore, a dramatic dialogue on the art of oratory set just before Crassus' death in 91 BC.Contents1 Early life 2 Political career2.1 Early career2.1.1 Prosecution of C. Papirius Carbo 2.1.2 Other Early Activity 2.1.3 Equestrian Juries Debate, 106 BC2.2 Consulship2.2.1 Lex Licinia Mucia2.3 Proconsulship2.3.1 Gallic Triumph 2.3.2 Causa Curiana2.4 Censorship2.4.1 Schools of Latin
Latin
Rhetoric2.5 91 BC3 Oratorical Skill 4 Family and Personal Life4.1 Family4.1.1 Marriage Alliance with C
[...More...]

"Lucius Licinius Crassus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Satire
Satire
Satire
is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.[1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism, using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society. A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm—"in satire, irony is militant"[2]—but parody, burlesque, exaggeration,[3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing
[...More...]

"Satire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gaius Lucilius
Gaius Lucilius (c. 180 – 103/2 BC),[1] the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was a Roman citizen of the equestrian class, born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania. He was a member of the Scipionic Circle.Contents1 Problem of his birthdate 2 Life and satire 3 References3.1 Editions of the fragments 3.2 Other ancient sources 3.3 Modern worksProblem of his birthdate[edit] The dates assigned by Jerome
Jerome
for his birth and death are 148 BC and 103 BC or 102 BC. But it is impossible to reconcile the first of these dates with other facts recorded of him, and the date given by Jerome
Jerome
must be due to an error, the true date being about 180 BC
[...More...]

"Gaius Lucilius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cognomen
A cognomen (/kɒɡˈnoʊmən/;[1][2] Classical Latin: [koːŋˈnoːmen]; Latin plural cognomina; from con- "together with" and (g)nomen "name") was the third name of a citizen of ancient Rome, under Roman naming conventions. Initially, it was a nickname, but it lost that purpose when it became hereditary. Hereditary cognomina were used to augment the second name (the family name, or clan name) in order to identify a particular branch within a family or family within a clan. The term has also taken on other contemporary meanings.Contents1 Roman names 2 As a contemporary term 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRoman names[edit] Further information: Roman naming conventions Because of the limited nature of the Latin praenomen, the cognomen developed to distinguish branches of the family from one another, and occasionally, to highlight an individual's achievement, typically in warfare
[...More...]

"Cognomen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Social War (91–88 BC)
The Social War (from socii ("allies"), thus Bellum Sociale;[1] also called the Italian War, the War of the Allies or the Marsic War) was a war waged from 91 to 88 BC between the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and several of the other cities in Italy, which prior to the war had been Roman allies for centuries. The war was begun by the Picentes
Picentes
because the Romans did not want to afford them Roman citizenship, thus leaving the Italian groups with fewer rights. The war resulted in a Roman victory and genocide against the Samnites. However, Rome gave most other cities the right to citizenship to avoid another war.Contents1 Origins 2 War 3 Roman concessions to the Allies 4 See also 5 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Roman victory in the Samnite Wars
Samnite Wars
resulted in effective Roman dominance of the Italian peninsula
[...More...]

"Social War (91–88 BC)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Publius Licinius Crassus Dives (consul 97 BC)
Licinius
Licinius
I (/lɪˈsɪniəs/; Latin: Gaius Valerius Licinianus Licinius Augustus;[note 1][2][3] c. 263 – 325) was a Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 308 to 324. For most of his reign he was the colleague and rival of Constantine I, with whom he co-authored the Edict of Milan
Edict of Milan
that granted official toleration to Christians in the Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Publius Licinius Crassus Dives (consul 97 BC)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crossing The Rubicon
Julius Caesar's crossing the Rubicon
Rubicon
river was an event in 49 BC that precipitated the Roman Civil War, which ultimately led to Caesar's becoming dictator for life and the rise of the imperial era of Rome. Caesar had been appointed to a governorship over a region that ranged from southern Gaul
Gaul
to Illyricum (but not Italy). As his term of governorship ended, the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
ordered Caesar to disband his army and return to Rome. He was explicitly ordered not to bring his army across the Rubicon
Rubicon
river, which was at that time a northern boundary of Italy. In January of 49 BC, Caesar brought the 13th legion across the river, which the Roman government considered insurrection, treason, and a declaration of war on the Roman Senate
[...More...]

"Crossing The Rubicon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Governor
A Roman governor
Roman governor
was an official either elected or appointed to be the chief administrator of Roman law
Roman law
throughout one or more of the many provinces constituting the Roman Empire. A Roman governor
Roman governor
is also known as a propraetor or proconsul. The generic term in Roman legal language was Rector provinciae, regardless of the specific titles, which also reflect the province's intrinsic and strategic status, and corresponding differences in authority. By the time of the early empire, there were two types of provinces — senatorial and imperial — and several types of governor would emerge
[...More...]

"Roman Governor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome
Rome
elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
[...More...]

"Roman Consul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Dictator
A dictator was a magistrate of the Roman Republic, entrusted with the full authority of the state to deal with a military emergency or to undertake a specific duty. All other magistrates were subordinate to his imperium, and the right of the plebeian tribunes to veto his actions or of the people to appeal from them was extremely limited. However, in order to prevent the dictatorship from threatening the state itself, severe limitations were placed upon its powers: a dictator could only act within his intended sphere of authority; and he was obliged to resign his office once his appointed task had been accomplished, or at the expiration of six months. Dictators were regularly appointed from the earliest period of the Republic down to the Second Punic War, but the magistracy then went into abeyance for over a century, until it was revived in a significantly modified form, first by Sulla, and then by Julius Caesar
[...More...]

"Roman Dictator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Politician
A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. In democratic countries, politicians seek elective positions within a government through elections or, at times, temporary appointment to replace politicians who have died, resigned or have been otherwise removed from office. In non-democratic countries, they employ other means of reaching power through appointment, bribery, revolutions and intrigues. Some politicians are experienced in the art or science of government.[1] Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people
[...More...]

"Politician" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.