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Marcian
Marcian
Marcian
(/ˈmɑːrʃən/; Latin: Flavius Marcianus Augustus; Greek: Μαρκιανός; c. 392 – 26 January 457) was the Eastern Roman Emperor from 450 to 457. Very little of his life before becoming emperor is known, other than that he was a domesticus who served under Ardabur
Ardabur
and his son Aspar
Aspar
for fifteen years. After the death of Emperor Theodosius II
Theodosius II
on 28 July 450, Marcian
Marcian
was made a candidate to the throne by Aspar, who held massive influence due to his military power
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Hemorrhaging
Bleeding, also known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging, is blood escaping from the circulatory system.[1] Bleeding
Bleeding
can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the mouth, nose, ear, urethra, vagina or anus, or through a break in the skin. Hypovolemia is a massive decrease in blood volume, and death by excessive loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination.[2] Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties (by comparison, blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume).[3] The stopping or controlling of bleeding is called hemostasis and is an important part of both first aid and surgery. The use of cyanoacrylate glue to prevent bleeding and seal battle wounds was designed and first used in the Vietnam War
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Aquileia
Aquileia
Aquileia
(/ˌækwɪˈliːə/; Italian: [akwiˈlɛːja]; Friulian: Acuilee/Aquilee/Aquilea;[1] Venetian: Aquiłeja/Aquiłegia; German: Aglar/Agley/Aquileja; Slovene: Oglej) is an ancient Roman city in Italy, at the head of the Adriatic at the edge of the lagoons, about 10 kilometres (6 mi) from the sea, on the river Natiso (modern Natisone), the course of which has changed somewhat since Roman times. Today, the city is small (about 3,500 inhabitants), but it was large and prominent in Antiquity as one of the world's largest cities with a population of 100,000 in the 2nd century A
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Battle Of The Catalaunian Plains
Huns
Huns
withdraw from GaulTactical outcome disputed Strategic importance disputedBelligerents Western Roman Empire Visigoths Salian Franks Burgundians Saxons Armoricans AlansHunnic Empire Amali Goths Rugians Scirii Thuringians Franks Gepids Burgundians HeruliCommanders and leadersFlavius Aetius Theodoric † Sangiban Thorismund Theodoric II[1] Merovech[2] Gundioc Avitus[3]
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Orleans
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Orléans
Orléans
(UK: /ɔːrˈliːənz/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[ɔʁleɑ̃][1]) is a city in north-central France, about 111 kilometres (69 mi) southwest of Paris
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Metz
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Armorica
Armorica
Armorica
or Aremorica is the name given in ancient times to the part of Gaul
Gaul
between the Seine
Seine
and the Loire
Loire
that includes the Brittany Peninsula, extending inland to an indeterminate point and down the Atlantic Coast.[1] The toponym is based on the Gaulish phrase are-mori "on/at [the] sea", made into the Gaulish place name Aremorica (*are-mor-ika) "Place by the Sea". The suffix -ika was first used to create adjectival forms and then names (see regions such as Pays d'Ouche from Utica and Perche
Perche
from Pertica). The original designation was vague, including a large part of what became Normandy
Normandy
in the 10th century and, in some interpretations, the whole of the coast down to the Garonne
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Ardabur
Ardabur
Ardabur
(died 471) was the son of Flavius Ardabur
Ardabur
Aspar,[1] Master of Horse and Magister Militum
Magister Militum
of the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
in the fifth century. Ardabur
Ardabur
apparently often served under his famous father during his campaigns. In 466 Ardabur
Ardabur
was accused of a treasonous plot, probably by his father's political enemies. The accusation accelerated Aspar's fall from power. Both Ardabur
Ardabur
and Aspar
Aspar
were killed in a riot in 471. References[edit]^ Alemany, Agustí (2000). Sources on the Alans: A Critical Compilation. BRILL. p. 112
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Eunuch
The term eunuch (/ˈjuːnək/; Greek: εὐνοῦχος)[1] generally refers to a man who has been castrated,[2] typically early enough in his life for this change to have major hormonal consequences. In Latin, the words eunuchus,[3] spado (Greek: σπάδων spadon),[4][5] and castratus were used to denote eunuchs.[6] Castration
Castration
was typically carried out on the soon-to-be eunuch without his consent in order that he might perform a specific social function; this was common in many societies
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Alans
The Alans
Alans
(or Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity.[1][2][3][4][5] The name Alan is an Iranian dialectical form of Aryan, a common self-designation of the Indo-Iranians.[2] Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans
Alans
have been conn
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Solidi
The solidus ( Latin
Latin
for "solid"; pl. solidi), nomisma (Greek: νόμισμα, nómisma, lit. "coin"), or bezant was originally a relatively pure gold coin issued in the Late Roman Empire. Under Constantine, who introduced it on a wide scale, it had a weight of about 4.5 grams. It was largely replaced in Western Europe by Pepin the Short's currency reform, which introduced the silver-based pound/shilling/penny system, under which the shilling (Latin: solidus) functioned as a unit of account equivalent to 12 pence, eventually developing into the French sou. In Eastern Europe, the nomisma was gradually debased by the Byzantine emperors until it was abolished by Alexius I
Alexius I
in 1092, who replaced it with the hyperpyron, which also came to be known as a "bezant"
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Foederati
Foederatus (/ˌfɛdəˈreɪtəs/ in English; pl. foederati /ˌfɛdəˈreɪtaɪ/) was any one of several outlying nations to which ancient Rome provided benefits in exchange for military assistance. The term was also used, especially under the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
for groups of "barbarian" mercenaries of various sizes, who were typically allowed to settle within the Roman Empire.Contents1 History1.1 The Republic 1.2 The Empire1.2.1 4th century 1.2.2 5th century 1.2.3 6th century2 See also 3 References3.1 Primary sources4 External linksHistory[edit] The Republic[edit] Early in the history of the Roman Republic, a foederatus identified one of the tribes bound by treaty (foedus /ˈfiːdəs/), who were neither Roman colonies nor beneficiaries of Roman citizenship (civitas) but were expected to provide a contingent of fighting men when trouble arose, thus were allies
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Ardabur (consul 427)
Ardabur
Ardabur
or Ardaburius (Greek: Ἀρδαβούριος) served as magister militum in the East Roman army
East Roman army
in the 420s, under Theodosius II. During the Roman-Persian War of 421–422, he invaded Arzanene
Arzanene
and Mesopotamia, besieging Nisibis
Nisibis
and defeating seven Persian generals. Three years later, Ardabur
Ardabur
and his son Aspar
Aspar
were sent on a campaign to Italy
Italy
to overthrow the usurper Joannes. Ardabur
Ardabur
was captured and held at Ravenna, where he succeeded in subverting some of the usurper's officers
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Domesticus (Roman Empire)
The origins of the word domesticus can be traced to the late 3rd century of the Late Roman army. It stems from the term “Protectores Domestici”, a guard unit serving as the staff to the Roman Emperor.[1] It is said that they originated from being “comes”, which were companions, or counts in various offices and the emperor, in this case a guard unit.[1] They often held high ranks in various fields, whether it was the servants of a noble house on the civilian side, or a high ranking military position. After serving under the emperor for a certain duration, the Domestici would be able to become leaders themselves and potentially command their own regiment of legionnaires in the military
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