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Marcel L'Herbier
Marcel L'Herbier (French: [lɛʁbje]; 23 April 1888 – 26 November 1979) was a French filmmaker who achieved prominence as an avant-garde theorist and imaginative practitioner with a series of silent films in the 1920s. His career as a director continued until the 1950s and he made more than 40 feature films in total. During the 1950s and 1960s, he worked on cultural programmes for French television
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Resurrection (novel)
Resurrection
Resurrection
(Russian: Воскресение, Voskreseniye), first published in 1899, was the last novel written by Leo Tolstoy. The book is the last of his major long fiction works published in his lifetime. Tolstoy intended the novel as an exposition of the injustice of man-made laws and the hypocrisy of the institutionalized church. The novel also explores the economic philosophy of Georgism, of which Tolstoy had become a very strong advocate towards the end of his life, and explains the theory in detail. It was first published serially in the popular weekly magazine Niva in an effort to raise funds for the resettlement of the Doukhobors.Contents1 Plot outline 2 Popular and critical reception 3 Adaptations 4 Notes 5 External linksPlot outline[edit] The story is about a nobleman named Dmitri Ivanovich Nekhlyudov, who seeks redemption for a sin committed years earlier
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Émile Vuillermoz
Émile-Jean-Joseph Vuillermoz (23 May 1878 – 2 March 1960) was a French critic in the areas of music, film, drama and literature. He was also a composer, but abandoned this for criticism. Early life[edit] Émile Vuillermoz was born in Lyon
Lyon
in 1878. He studied literature and law at University of Lyon, then became a music student at the Conservatoire de Paris, his teachers being Jules Massenet, Gabriel Fauré,[1] Antoine Taudou and Daniel Fleuret.[2] Among his fellow students was Maurice Ravel, who became his lifelong friend.[3] He was a member of Les Apaches, along with Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, Manuel de Falla
Manuel de Falla
and others.[1] Career[edit] He had early success as a writer of songs and operettas, and with settings of French and Canadian folk songs,[4] but chose to follow the career of a critic instead
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The Late Mattia Pascal
Pascal
Pascal
or PASCAL may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Science and technology 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople[edit] Pascal
Pascal
(given name)Saint Pascal, Paschal Baylon
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Légion D'honneur
The Legion of Honour, full name, National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur),[2] is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present. The order's motto is "Honneur et Patrie" ("Honour and Fatherland"), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the
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Darius Milhaud
Darius Milhaud
Darius Milhaud
(French: [daʁjys mijo]; 4 September 1892 – 22 June 1974) was a French composer, conductor, and teacher. He was a member of Les Six—also known as The Group of Six—and one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century. His compositions are influenced by jazz and Brazilian music and make extensive use of polytonality. Milhaud is considered one of the key modernist composers.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Works 3 Notable students 4 Archival collections 5 Selected filmography 6 Legacy 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Marseille
Marseille
to a Jewish
Jewish
family from Aix-en-Provence, Milhaud began as a violinist, later turning to composition instead
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Société Des Cinéromans
The Société des Cinéromans was a French film production company of the silent movie era.Contents1 History 2 Filmography 3 Bibliography 4 External linksHistory[edit] In 1919, Gaston Leroux founded the Société des Cinéromans in Nice with René Navarre and Arthur Bernède to publish novels and turn them into films. The company was taken over by Pathé in 1922
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Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
Charles Boyer
(French: [bwaje]; 28 August 1899 – 26 August 1978) was a French actor who appeared in more than 80 films between 1920 and 1976.[1] After receiving an education in drama, Boyer started on the stage, but he found his success in American films during the 1930s. His memorable performances were among the era's most highly praised, in romantic dramas such as The Garden of Allah (1936), Algiers (1938), and Love Affair (1939), as well as the mystery-thriller Gaslight (1944)
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Gaston Leroux
Gaston Louis Alfred Leroux (6 May 1868[1] – 15 April 1927) was a French journalist and author of detective fiction. In the English-speaking world, he is best known for writing the novel The Phantom of the Opera
The Phantom of the Opera
(Le Fantôme de l'Opéra, 1910), which has been made into several film and stage productions of the same name, notably the 1925 film starring Lon Chaney, and Andrew Lloyd Webber's 1986 musical. His novel The Mystery of the Yellow Room
The Mystery of the Yellow Room
is also one of the most famous locked-room mysteries ever.Contents1 Life and career 2 Novels2.1 The Adventures of Rouletabille 2.2 Chéri Bibi 2.3 Other novels 2.4 Short stories 2.5 Plays3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Leroux was born in Paris
Paris
in 1868 and died in 1927 in Nice. He went to school in Normandy
Normandy
and studied law in Paris, graduating in 1889
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Gaby Morlay
Gaby Morlay
Gaby Morlay
(born Blanche Pauline Fumoleau; 8 June 1893 – 4 July 1964) was a French film actress.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Selected filmography 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Morley began acting in the era of silent films, and became known as co-star with Max Linder
Max Linder
in his "Max" series. She starred in a series of "Gaby" films such Gaby en auto (1917) and more than twenty other silent films. She moved easily into talking films in the early 1930s.[2] She played Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in the 1939 historical film Entente cordiale.[citation needed] She had an affair with the government minister Max Bonnafous (1900–75) during World War II (1939–45), and as a result was investigated for collaboration with the Nazis after the liberation of France
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Pathé
Pathé
Pathé
or Pathé
Pathé
Frères (French pronunciation: ​[pate fʁɛʁ], styled as PATHÉ!) is the name of various French businesses that were founded and originally run by the Pathé
Pathé
Brothers of France starting in 1896. In the early 1900s, Pathé
Pathé
became the world's largest film equipment and production company, as well as a major producer of phonograph records. In 1908, Pathé
Pathé
invented the newsreel that was shown in cinemas prior to a feature film.[2] Today, Pathé
Pathé
is a major film production and distribution company, owning a number of cinema chains through its subsidiary Les Cinémas Gaumont Pathé
Pathé
and television networks across Europe
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Honoré De Balzac
Honoré de Balzac
Honoré de Balzac
(/ˈbɔːlzæk, ˈbæl-/;[2] French: [ɔ.nɔ.ʁe d(ə) bal.zak], born Honoré Balzac,[1] 20 May 1799 – 18 August 1850) was a French novelist and playwright. The novel sequence La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of post-Napoleonic French life, is generally viewed as his magnum opus. Owing to his keen observation of detail and unfiltered representation of society, Balzac is regarded as one of the founders of realism in European literature.[3] He is renowned for his multi-faceted characters; even his lesser characters are complex, morally ambiguous and fully human. Inanimate objects are imbued with character as well; the city of Paris, a backdrop for much of his writing, takes on many human qualities
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Léon Gaumont
Léon Gaumont
Léon Gaumont
(10 May 1864 – 9 August 1946) was a French inventor, engineer, and industrialist who was a pioneer of the motion picture industry. Biography[edit] Léon Ernest Gaumont, born in Semblancay, Indre-et-Loire
Indre-et-Loire
was gifted with a mechanical mind which led him to employment manufacturing precision instruments. From early childhood, he was fascinated by the technique of photography. When he was offered a job at the Comptoir géneral de photographie in 1893, he jumped at the opportunity. His decision proved fortunate when two years later he was given the chance to acquire the business. In August 1895, he partnered with the astronomer fr:Joseph Vallot, the famous engineer Gustave Eiffel, and the financier Alfred Besnier to make the purchase. Their business entity, called L. Gaumont et Cie, has survived in one form or another to become the world's oldest surviving film company extant
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Panchromatic Film
Panchromatic emulsion is a type of black-and-white photographic emulsion that is sensitive to all wavelengths of visible light. Description[edit]A Hawker Tornado
Hawker Tornado
prototype fighter of WWII, with the RAF roundel colors of chrome yellow in the outermost ring, and the red centre giving false dark gray colors from orthochromatic film usage.A panchromatic emulsion produces a realistic reproduction of a scene as it appears to the human eye. Almost all modern photographic film is panchromatic, but some types are orthochromatic and are not sensitive to certain wavelengths of light. As naturally prepared, silver halide emulsions are much more sensitive to blue and UV light than to green and red wavelengths. The German chemist Hermann W. Vogel
Hermann W. Vogel
found out how to extend the sensitivity into the green, and later the orange, by adding sensitising dyes to the emulsion
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Paris Bourse
The Paris
Paris
Bourse (French: Bourse de Paris) is the historical Paris stock exchange, known as Euronext
Euronext
Paris
Paris
from 2000 onwards
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Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil Blount DeMille (/ˈsɛsəl dəˈmɪl/;[1] August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was an American filmmaker. Between 1914 and 1958, he made a total of 70 features, both silent and sound films.[2] He is acknowledged as a founding father of the cinema of the United States and the most commercially successful producer-director in film history.[3] His films were distinguished by their epic scale and by his cinematic showmanship. He made silent films of every genre: social dramas, comedies, Westerns, farces, morality plays, and historical pageants. DeMille began his career as a stage actor in 1900.[4] He later moved to writing and directing stage productions, some with Jesse Lasky, who was then a vaudeville producer. DeMille's first film, The Squaw Man (1914), was also the first feature film shot in Hollywood
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