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Manitoba Act
The Manitoba
Manitoba
Act (French: Loi sur le Manitoba),[1] is an act of the Parliament of Canada
Parliament of Canada
that is defined by the Constitution Act, 1982[2] as forming a part of the Constitution of Canada. The Manitoba
Manitoba
Act, received royal assent on May 12, 1870. It created the province of Manitoba
Manitoba
and continued to enforce An Act for the Temporary Government of Rupert's Land
Rupert's Land
and the North-Western Territories when united with Canada[3] upon the absorption of the British territories of Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory
North-Western Territory
into Canada on July 15, 1870
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Act Of Parliament
Acts of Parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature).[1] Act of the Oireachtas
Act of the Oireachtas
is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
where the legislature is commonly known by its Iri
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John A. Macdonald
Rebellions of 1837–1838 Upper Canada
Upper Canada
RebellionSir John Alexander Macdonald (11 January 1815 – 6 June 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada
Prime Minister of Canada
(1867–1873, 1878–1891). The dominant figure of Canadian Confederation, he had a political career which spanned almost half a century. Macdonald was born in Scotland; when he was a boy his family immigrated to Kingston in the Province of Upper Canada
Upper Canada
(today in eastern Ontario). As a lawyer he was involved in several high-profile cases and quickly became prominent in Kingston, which elected him in 1844 to the legislature of the Province of Canada
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Statutes Of Canada
A statute is a formal written enactment of a legislative authority that governs a city, state, or country.[1] Typically, statutes command or prohibit something, or declare policy.[1] Statutes are rules made by legislative bodies; they are distinguished from case law or precedent, which is decided by courts, and regulations issued by government agencies.[1]Contents1 Publication and organization 2 Alternative meanings2.1 International law 2.2 Autonomy statute3 Religious statutes3.1 Biblical terminology 3.2 Dharma4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPublication and organization[edit] In virtually all countries, newly enacted statutes are published in some kind of journal, gazette, or chronological compilation, which is then distributed so that everyone can look up the statutory law. A universal problem encountered by lawmakers throughout human history is how to organize published statutes
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Republic Of Manitobah
The Republic of Manitobah was a short-lived, unrecognized state founded in June 1867 by Thomas Spence at the town of Portage la Prairie in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba.Contents1 History 2 Demise 3 Films 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] During this time the future province was still part of Rupert's Land, a territory owned by the Hudson's Bay Company. It was soon to become a part of the Northwest Territories when Canada purchased Rupert's Land from "the Bay" in 1869. As Portage la Prairie had no government, laws or taxation at the time, Spence and a group of local settlers wrote to Queen Victoria asking for recognition as a political entity. There was no reply. Spence organized the community as the "Republic of Caledonia" in January 1868
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Supreme Court Of Canada
45°25'19.00"N 75°42'20.00"WComposition method Judicial appointments in CanadaAuthorized by Constitution Act, 1867
Constitution Act, 1867
and Supreme Court ActJudge term length Mandatory retirement at age 75No
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House Of Commons Of Canada
Her Majesty's Government     Liberal Party (183)Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition     Conservative Party (97)Other parties:Parties with official status     New Democratic Party
New Democratic Party
(44)Parties without official status     Quebec
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Parliament Of Canada
Initially assumed some jurisdiction from:Parliament of the Province of Canada General Assembly of Nova Scotia New Brunswick
New Brunswick
LegislatureLater added some jurisdiction from:Hudson's Bay Company Legislature
Legislature

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Indian Act Of Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Indian Act (An Act respecting Indians, French: Loi sur les Indiens), (the Act) is a Canadian Act of Parliament that concerns registered Indians, their bands, and the system of Indian reserves.[1][2] First passed in 1876 and still in force with amendments, it is the primary document which defines how the Government of Canada interacts with the 614 First Nation bands in Canada and their members. Throughout its long history the Act has been an ongoing subject of controversy and has been interpreted in different ways by both Aboriginal Canadians and non-Aboriginal Canadians. The legislation has been amended many times, including "over twenty major changes" made by 2002.[3] The Act is very wide-ranging in scope, covering governance, land use, healthcare, education, and more on Indian reserves
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Wolseley Expedition
Bloodless Government victory;Government forces capture fort Louis Riel
Louis Riel
escapesBelligerents Canada MétisCommanders and leadersGarnet Wolseley Louis RielCasualties and lossesNone NoneThe Wolseley expedition
Wolseley expedition
was a military force authorized by Sir John A. Macdonald to confront Louis Riel
Louis Riel
and the Métis in 1870, during the Red River Rebellion, at the Red River Colony
Red River Colony
in what is now the Canadian province
Canadian province
of Manitoba
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Separate Schools
In Canada, a separate school is a type of school that has constitutional status in three provinces (Ontario, Alberta and Saskatchewan) and statutory status in three territories (Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut). In these Canadian jurisdictions, a separate school is one operated by a civil authority—a separate school board—with a mandate enshrined in the Canadian Constitution (for the three provinces) or in federal statutes (for the three territories). In these six jurisdictions a civil electorate, composed of the members of the minority faith, elects separate school trustees according to the province's or territory's local authorities election legislation. These trustees are legally accountable to their electorate and to the provincial or territorial government
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