HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Manhattan Institute For Policy Research
The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
(renamed in 1981 from the International Center for Economic Policy Studies) is a conservative 501(c)(3) non-profit American think tank focused on domestic policy and urban affairs, established in New York City
New York City
in 1977 by Antony Fisher and William J. Casey.[1][3][4] The organization describes its mission as to "develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility"
[...More...]

"Manhattan Institute For Policy Research" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Antony Fisher
Antony is a masculine given name and a surname which may refer to: Given name[edit] Mark Antony
Mark Antony
(83–30 BC), Roman politician and general Anthony the Great
Anthony the Great
(c
[...More...]

"Antony Fisher" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Queens Midtown Tunnel
The Queens–Midtown Tunnel (sometimes simply known as the Midtown Tunnel)[2][3] is a highway, tunnel and toll road in New York City. It crosses under the East River and connects the borough of Queens (at the Long Island City terminus of the Long Island Expressway) on Long Island, with the borough of Manhattan (between the major crosstown thoroughfares of East 34th Street and East 42nd Street in the Midtown Manhattan area). Designed by Ole Singstad, it was opened to traffic on November 15, 1940. The tunnel consists of twin tubes carrying four traffic lanes, and is 6,414 feet (1,955 m) long. It once carried New York State Route 24
[...More...]

"Queens Midtown Tunnel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tom Wolfe
Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. (born March 2, 1931)[1] is an American author and journalist, best known for his association with and influence in stimulating the New Journalism
New Journalism
literary movement, in which literary techniques are used extensively. He reduced traditional values of journalistic objectivity. He began his career as a regional newspaper reporter in the 1950s, but achieved national prominence in the 1960s following the publication of such best-selling books as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
(a highly experimental account of Ken Kesey
Ken Kesey
and the Merry Pranksters), and two collections of articles and essays, Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. His first novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, published in 1987, was met with critical acclaim, and also became a commercial success
[...More...]

"Tom Wolfe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fortune (magazine)
Fortune is a multinational business magazine, published and owned by Meredith Corporation
Meredith Corporation
and headquartered in New York City. The publication was founded by Henry Luce
Henry Luce
in 1929
[...More...]

"Fortune (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Pataki
George Elmer Pataki (/pəˈtɑːki/; born June 24, 1945) is an American lawyer and Republican politician who served as the 53rd Governor of New York
Governor of New York
(1995–2006). An attorney by profession, Pataki was elected mayor of his hometown of Peekskill, New York
Peekskill, New York
and went on to be elected to the State Assembly and the State Senate. In 1994, Pataki ran for Governor of New York
Governor of New York
against three-term incumbent Mario Cuomo, defeating him by a margin of more than three points as part of the Republican Revolution
Republican Revolution
of 1994. Pataki would himself be elected to three consecutive terms, and was the third Republican Governor of New York elected since 1923 (the other two were Govs. Thomas E. Dewey
Thomas E. Dewey
and Nelson Rockefeller)
[...More...]

"George Pataki" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Walter Olson
Walter K. Olson (born 1954) is an author and blogger who writes mostly about legal subjects, including tort reform. Olson is a senior fellow of the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington, D.C. Formerly, Olson was associated with the Manhattan Institute
Manhattan Institute
in New York City. He founded several websites, including the Manhattan Institute's scholarly PointOfLaw.com, and continues to run Overlawyered.com, a more popularly oriented website focusing on tort reform and alleged overreaching by lawyers. He has published four books on the American litigation system: The Litigation Explosion, The Excuse Factory, The Rule of Lawyers, and most recently Schools for Misrule. The Washington Post
The Washington Post
has dubbed Olson an "intellectual guru of tort reform."[1] He has testified to Congress numerous times, and has written articles for publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Reason, and The New York Times
[...More...]

"Walter Olson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rudy Giuliani
Mayor of New York CityMayoralty Campaign for the Mayoralty (1993) Crime ControlBill Bratton Stop-and-Frisk Broken windowsReelection (1997) Kerik promotionsSeptember 11 attacksPolitical positions Public imageLeadershipv t eRudolph William Louis Giuliani KBE[1] (/ˌdʒuːliˈɑːni/; born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, businessman, public speaker, former mayor of New York City, and an informal adviser on cybersecurity to the White House.[2] Politically a Democrat, then an Independent in the 1970s, and a Republican since the 1980s, Giuliani was the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York
Southern District of New York
during the 1980s
[...More...]

"Rudy Giuliani" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

September 11 Attacks
The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11)[a] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States
United States
on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage.[2][3] Four passenger airliners operated by two major U.S. passenger air carriers ( United Airlines
United Airlines
and American Airlines) – all of which departed from airports in the northeastern United States
United States
bound for California – were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists
[...More...]

"September 11 Attacks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Center For Policing Terrorism
The Center for Policing Terrorism (CPT) is a national-security think tank formed after 9/11 in New York City.Contents1 Founding Personalities 2 National Counter Terrorism Academy 3 Intelligence-led policing 4 Intelligence Support to NYPD 5 References 6 External linksFounding Personalities[edit] The Center's founders included former National Security Council Staffer RP Eddy and former White House Counter-Terrorism chief Richard A. Clarke. Policy analyst Mark Riebling served as the Center's Research Director
[...More...]

"Center For Policing Terrorism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Mark Riebling
Mark Riebling is an American author. He has written two books: Wedge: The Secret War between the FBI and CIA and Church of Spies: The Pope's Secret War Against Hitler.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Influence 4 Wedge: From Pearl Harbor to 9/11 5 References 6 External linksEducation[edit] Riebling did graduate work in political philosophy at Columbia University, studied English at Dartmouth College, and majored in philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley. Career[edit] From 2001 to 2010 Riebling served as editorial director at the Manhattan Institute and directed its book program
[...More...]

"Mark Riebling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II
World War II
with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict
[...More...]

"United Nations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edward Glaeser
Edward Ludwig "Ed" Glaeser (born May 1, 1967) is an American economist and Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics
Economics
at Harvard University. He was educated at The Collegiate School
The Collegiate School
in New York City before obtaining his B.A. in economics from Princeton University
Princeton University
and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Glaeser joined the faculty of Harvard
Harvard
in 1992, where he is currently (as of April 2012) the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor at the Department of Economics, the Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston
Boston
(both at the Kennedy School of Government)
[...More...]

"Edward Glaeser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William J. Casey
William Joseph "Bill" Casey (March 13, 1913 – May 6, 1987) was the Director of Central Intelligence
Director of Central Intelligence
from 1981 to 1987. In this capacity he oversaw the entire United States
United States
Intelligence Community and personally directed the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
(CIA).Contents1 Life and career1.1 Director of Central Intelligence1.1.1 Iran–Contra affair2 Personal life 3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] A native of Elmhurst, Queens, New York, Casey graduated from Fordham University in 1934. He did graduate work at the Catholic University of America before earning an LL.B.
LL.B.
from St. John's University School of Law in 1937
[...More...]

"William J. Casey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York Post
The New York Post
New York Post
is an American daily newspaper that is primarily distributed in New York City
New York City
and its surrounding area. It is the 13th-oldest newspaper in the United States, and it had the sixth-highest circulation in 2009.[2] Established in 1801 by federalist and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, it became a respected broadsheet in the 19th century, under the name New York Evening Post. The modern version of the paper is published in tabloid format. In 1976, Rupert Murdoch
Rupert Murdoch
bought the Post for US$30.5 million.[3] Since 1993, Post has been owned by News Corporation and its successor, News Corp, which had owned it previously from 1976 to 1988
[...More...]

"New York Post" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Steve Malanga
Steven Malanga is a contributing editor to City Journal and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, which publishes City Journal. His primary area of focus is economic development within dense urban centers, with a particular emphasis on those areas in and surrounding New York and the Tri-State Area. Writing[edit] He has written extensively on the issues of collective bargaining, the differential in pay scale between public and private employees, and the political dynamics set in motion by the growth of non-profit entities within large cities. His recent book is The New New Left. In 2010, Malanga published Shakedown: The Continuing Conspiracy Against the American Taxpayer, warning that a self-interested coalition of public-sector unions and government-financed community activists would harm taxpayers
[...More...]

"Steve Malanga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.