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Mandapa
Mandapa
Mandapa
(also spelled mantapa or mandapam) in Indian architecture
Indian architecture
is a pillared outdoor hall or pavilion for public rituals.[1]Contents1 Temple architecture 2 Name variations 3 Other languages 4 Notes 5 See also 6 External linksTemple architecture[edit] Mandapa
Mandapa
porch, ShimogaIn the Hindu temple
Hindu temple
the mandapa is a porch-like structure through the (gopuram) (ornate gateway) and leading to the temple. It is used for religious dancing and music and is part of the basic temple compound.[2] The prayer hall was generally built in front of the temple's sanctum sanctorum (garbhagriha). A large temple would have many mandapas.[3] If a temple has more than one mandapa, each one is allocated for a different function and given a name to reflect its use
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Bangkok
Bangkok
Bangkok
(UK: /bæŋˈkɒk/,[6][7] US: /ˈbæŋkɒk/[7][8]) is the capital and most populous city of the Kingdom of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon (กรุงเทพมหานคร, pronounced [krūŋ tʰêːp mahǎː nákʰɔ̄ːn] ( listen)) or simply Krung Thep ( listen (help·info)). The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population
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Koil
Koil or Koyil or Kovil, (meaning: residence of God[N 1]) is the Tamil term for a distinct style of Hindu temple with Dravidian architecture. Both the terms koyil (கோயில், kōyil) and kovil (கோவில், kōvil)[1] are used interchangeably. In Tamil language, kōvil (wikt:ta:கோவில்)[2] is the word derived, according to the rules of Tamil grammar.[N 2]The Meenakshi Amman Hindu temple in the Tamil Nadu city of Madurai in southern India.Wikimedia Commons has media related to Hindu temples in Tamil Nadu by district.In contemporary Tamil, the term 'kōvil' is also used to refer to Christian churches
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Java
Java
Java
(Indonesian: Jawa; Javanese: ꦗꦮ; Sundanese: ᮏᮝ) is an island of Indonesia. At about 139,000 square kilometres (54,000 sq mi), the island is comparable in size to England, the U.S. State
U.S. State
of North Carolina, or Omsk Oblast. With a population of over 141 million (the island itself) or 145 million (the administrative region), Java
Java
is home to 56.7 percent of the Indonesian population and is the world's most populous island.[1] The Indonesian capital city, Jakarta, is located on western Java. Much of Indonesian history took place on Java. It was the center of powerful Hindu-Buddhist empires, the Islamic sultanates, and the core of the colonial Dutch East Indies. Java
Java
was also the center of the Indonesian struggle for independence during the 1930s and 1940s
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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
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Indonesian Language
Indonesian (bahasa Indonesia
Indonesia
[baˈhasa indoneˈsia]) is the official language of Indonesia. It is a standardized register of Malay, an Austronesian language that has been used as a lingua franca in the multilingual Indonesian archipelago
Indonesian archipelago
for centuries. Indonesia
Indonesia
is the fourth most populous nation in the world
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Mount Meru
Mount Meru
Mount Meru
(Sanskrit: मेरु, Tibetan: ཪི་རྒྱལ་པོ་རི་རབ་, Sumeru, Sineru or Mahameru) is the sacred five-peaked mountain of Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist cosmology
Buddhist cosmology
and is considered to be the center of all the physical, metaphysical and spiritual universes.[1] Meru (Sinhalese:"මහා මේරු පර්වතය") to which is added the approbatory prefix su-, results in the meaning "Excellent Meru", "Wonderful Meru" or "Great Meru". In other languages, (Chinese: 須彌山 Xūmíshān; Pāli Meru; Burmese: မြင်းမိုရ် Myinmo), Khmer:ភ្នំព្រះសុមេរុ (Phnom Preah So Mae). Many famous Hindu
Hindu
and similar Jain
Jain
as well as Buddhist temples have been built as symbolic representations of this mountain
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Tamil Language
 Sri Lanka  Singapore  India:Tamil Nadu[3] Puducherry[4] Andaman & Nicobar Islands[5]Recognised minority language in Malaysia[6]  Mauritius[7]  South Africa[8]Language codesISO 639-1 taISO 639-2 tamISO 639-3 Variously: tam – Modern Tamil oty – Old Tamil ptq – Pattapu BhashaiLinguist Listoty Old TamilGlottolog tamil1289  Modern Tamil[9] oldt1248  Old Tamil[10]Linguasphere 49-EBE-aThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Indic text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks or boxes, misplaced vowels or missing conjuncts instead of Indic text.Tamil is written in a non-Latin script
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Vimana (shrine)
Vimana is the structure over the garbhagriha or inner sanctum (Odia: ଦେଉଳ/Deula, ଗର୍ଭଗୃହ/Garbhagruha) in the Hindu temples of South India and Odisha
Odisha
in East India. In typical temples of Odisha
Odisha
using the Kalinga style of architecture, the Vimana is the tallest structure of the temple, as it is in the shikhara towers of temples in West and North India. By contrast, in large South Indian temples, it is typically smaller than the great gatehouses or gopuram, which are the most immediately striking architectural elements in a temple complex. In North Indian temple architecture texts, the superstructure over the garbhagriha is called a 'shikhara'
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Dravidian Architecture
Dravidian architecture
Dravidian architecture
is an architectural idiom in Hindu temple architecture that emerged in the southern part of the Indian subcontinent or South India, reaching its final form by the sixteenth century. It consists primarily of Hindu temples where the dominating feature is the high gopura or gatehouse; large temples have several. Mentioned as one of three styles of temple building in the ancient book Vastu shastra, the majority of the existing structures are located in the Southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
and Telangana. Various kingdoms and empires such as the Cholas, the Chera, the Kakatiyas, the Pandyas, the Pallavas, the Gangas, the Rashtrakutas, the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas, and Vijayanagara Empire
Vijayanagara Empire
among others have made substantial contribution to the evolution of Tamizhian architecture
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Wedding Mandap
A wedding mandap is a mandap (covered structure with pillars) temporarily erected[1] for the purpose of a Hindu or Jain wedding. The main wedding ceremonies take place under the mandap. It is traditionally made of wood, although now modern materials are sometimes used.[2] It often comes as a set that includes pillars supporting a frame, royal chairs for the bride and the groom, side chairs for parents and a pedestal for the sacred fire. It is often rented from businesses that specialize in renting items for an Indian wedding
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Burmese Language
The Burmese language
Burmese language
(Burmese: မြန်မာဘာသာ, MLCTS: mranmabhasa, IPA: [mjəmà bàðà]) is the official language of Myanmar. Although the Constitution of Myanmar
Myanmar
officially recognizes the English name of the language as the Myanmar
Myanmar
language,[4] most English speakers continue to refer to the language as Burmese. In 2007, it was spoken as a first language by 34 million, primarily the Bamar (Burman) people and related ethnic groups, and as a second language by 10 million, particularly ethnic minorities in Myanmar
Myanmar
and neighboring countries. Burmese is a tonal, pitch-register, and syllable-timed language,[5] largely monosyllabic and analytic, with a subject–object–verb word order. It is a member of the Lolo-Burmese grouping of the Sino-Tibetan language family
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Thingyan
Thingyan
Thingyan
(Burmese: သင်္ကြန်; MLCTS: sangkran, [θɪ́ɴdʑàɴ]; Arakanese: [θɔ́ɴkràɴ]; from Sanskrit saṁkrānti, which means "transit [of the Sun from Pisces to Aries]"[1]) is the Burmese New Year Festival and usually falls around mid-April. It is a Buddhist festival celebrated over a period of four to five days, culminating in the New Year. The dates of the Thingyan Festival are calculated according to the Burmese calendar
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Thai Language
Thai,[3] Central Thai,[4] or Siamese,[5] is the national and official language of Thailand
Thailand
and the first language of the Thai people
Thai people
and the vast majority of Thai Chinese. It is a member of the Tai group of the Tai–Kadai language family. Over half of its words are borrowed from Pali, Sanskrit, Mon, and Old Khmer
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Hor Trai
A ho trai (Thai: หอไตร) is the library of a Thai Buddhist temple. A ho trai can come in different shapes and sizes. For many centuries, the sacred Tripitaka
Tripitaka
scriptures had been written on palm leaves. To preserve the scriptures against humidity and against termites, the library was often built on columns to raise the storage from the ground. Bricks were preferably used in constructions to battle termites. Sometimes the ho trai would be built, especially for this reason, above man-made ponds. Traditionally, the Tripitaka
Tripitaka
scriptures consisted of individual palm leaves, each measuring around 50 cm in length and around 4 to 6 cm in width. They were perforated and threaded in order to combine them in stacks of 20 to 40 pages. These stacks are kept pressed between two pieces of teakwood which is then wrapped in cloth and stored in a special bookcase
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Wat Chiang Man
Wat
Wat
Chiang Man (Thai: วัดเชียงมั่น − sometimes also written as Wat
Wat
Chiang Mun) is a Buddhist temple (Thai language: Wat) inside the old city (which is contained within the city walls and moat) of Chiang Mai, in northern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Sights 3 See also 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Wat
Wat
Chiang Man was built by Mangrai[1]:209 in 1297 CE as the first temple of Chiang Mai
Chiang Mai
on the location of Wiang Nopburi, a fortified town of the Lawa people which had been used by King Mangrai
Mangrai
as a camp during the construction of his new capital city Chiang Mai.[2] Sights[edit]Plan of Wat
Wat
Chiang ManChedi Chang Lom - the 'Elephant Chedi' is the oldest construction within the temple complex
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