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Malatya
Malatya
Malatya
(Armenian: Մալաթիա Malat'ya; Kurdish: Meletî‎[3]; Classical Syriac: ܡܠܝܛܝܢܐ‎ Malīṭīná; Ottoman Turkish: مالاتيا‎) is a large city in the Eastern Anatolia
Eastern Anatolia
region of Turkey
Turkey
and the capital of Malatya
Malatya
Province. The city has been a human settlement for thousands of years. The Assyrians called the city Meliddu.[4] Strabo says that the city was known "to the ancients"[5] as Melitene
Melitene
(Ancient Greek Μελιτηνή), a name adopted by the Romans following Roman expansion into the east
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Kingdom Of Cappadocia
The Kingdom of Cappadocia
Cappadocia
was a Hellenistic-era Iranian kingdom[1][2] centered in the historical region of Cappadocia
Cappadocia
in Asia Minor (present-day Turkey). It developed from the former Achaemenid satrapy of Cappadocia, and it was founded by its last satrap, Ariarathes (later Ariarathes I). Throughout its history, it was ruled by three families in succession; the House of Ariarathes (331-96 BC), the House of Ariobarzanes (96 BC-36 BC), and lastly that of Archelaus (36 BC-17 AD)
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Akkadian Language
Akkadian
Akkadian
(/əˈkeɪdiən/ akkadû, 𒀝𒅗𒁺𒌑 ak-ka-du-u2; logogram: 𒌵𒆠 URIKI )[2][3] is an extinct East Semitic language that was spoken in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(Akkad, Assyria, Isin, Larsa and Babylonia) from the 30th century BC until its gradual replacement by Akkadian-influenced Eastern Aramaic among Mesopotamians between the 8th century BC and its final extinction by the 1st to 3rd centuries AD. It is the earliest attested Semitic language,[4] and used the cuneiform writing system, which was originally used to write the unrelated, and also extinct, Sumerian (which is a language isolate). Akkadian
Akkadian
was named after the city of Akkad, a major centre of Mesopotamian civilization during the Akkadian Empire
Akkadian Empire
(c
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Hittites
The Hittites
Hittites
(/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire centered on Hattusa
Hattusa
in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia
Anatolia
as well as parts of the northern Levant
Levant
and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC the Hittite Empire
Empire
came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire
Empire
and the empire of the Mitanni
Mitanni
for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c
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Urartian Language
The Urartian, Vannic, language was spoken by the inhabitants of the ancient kingdom of Urartu, located in the region of Lake Van, with its capital near the site of the modern town of Van, in the Armenian Highland, modern-day Eastern Anatolia region
Eastern Anatolia region
of Turkey.[2] It was probably dominant around Lake Van
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Fertile Crescent
The Fertile Crescent
Crescent
(also known as the "cradle of civilization") is a crescent-shaped region where agriculture and early human civilizations like the Sumer
Sumer
and
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
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Metropolitan Municipalities In Turkey
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Ariobarzanes Of Cappadocia (other)
Ariobarzanes of Cappadocia may refer to:Ariobarzanes I of Cappadocia, king of Cappadocia from 93 BC to ca. 63 or 62 BC Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia, son and successor of Ariobarzanes I, murdered some time before 51 BC Ariobarzanes III of Cappadocia, son and successor of Ariobarzanes II, who ruled from ca. 51 BC until his execution in 42 BCSee also[edit]Ariobarzanes (other)This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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Assyrian People
250,000-400,000 (1.4 million - 2 million Pre- Iraq
Iraq
War)[7][8][5] Iran 20,000-50,000[9][10] Turkey 15,000–65,000[9][11][8]Diaspora: Numbers can vary Sweden 120,000[12] Germany 70,000-100,000[13][14] United States 80,000-400,000[15] [16] Australia 46,217[17] Jordan 44,000-60,000[18][5] Lebanon 39,000-200,000[19][20][5] Netherlands 20,000[21] France 16,000[22] Belgium 15,000[21] Russia 15,000[23] Canada 10,810[24] Denmark 10,000[21] 
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Urartu
Urartu
Urartu
(/ʊˈrɑːrtuː/; Armenian: Ուրարտու), also known as Kingdom of Van (Urartian: Biai, Biainili;[3] Assyrian: māt Urarṭu;[4] Babylonian: Urashtu; Armenian: Վանի թագավորություն, translit. Vani t′agavorut′yun)[5] was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom centred on Lake Van
Lake Van
in the Armenian Highlands. It corresponds to the biblical Kingdom of Ararat. Strictly speaking, Urartu
Urartu
is the Assyrian term for a geographical region, while "Kingdom of Urartu" or "Biainili lands" are terms used in modern historiography for the Urartian-speaking Iron Age
Iron Age
state that arose in that region
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Ottoman Turkish Language
Ottoman Turkish (/ˈɒtəmən/; Turkish: Osmanlı Türkçesi), or the Ottoman language (Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانى‎, lisân-ı Osmânî, also known as تركجه‎, Türkçe or تركی‎, Türkî, "Turkish"; Turkish: Osmanlıca), is the variety of the Turkish language
Turkish language
that was used in the Ottoman Empire. It borrows, in all aspects, extensively from Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and it was written in the Ottoman Turkish alphabet
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Classical Syriac Language
Syriac /ˈsɪri.æk/ (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ Leššānā Suryāyā), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac,[4][5][6] is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that is the minority language of indigenous ethnic Assyrians/Syriacs in south eastern Turkey, northern Iraq, northeastern Syria
Syria
and North western Iran
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