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Mal Waldron Plays The Blues
Mal Waldron
Mal Waldron
Plays the Blues is a live album by American jazz pianist Mal Waldron
Mal Waldron
recorded in Munich
Munich
in 1971 and released on the Enja label.[1]Contents1 Reception 2 Track listing 3 Personnel 4 ReferencesReception[edit] The Allmusic review by Scott Yanow awarded the album 3 stars stating "The three Waldron and two Woode compositions generally have their own personalities (although none became standards) and serve as excellent showcases for Waldron's repetitive and percussive style
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Mal Waldron
Malcolm Earl "Mal" Waldron (August 16, 1925 – December 2, 2002) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger. He started playing professionally in New York in 1950, after graduating from university. In the following dozen years or so Waldron led his own bands and played for those led by Charles Mingus, Jackie McLean, John Coltrane, and Eric Dolphy, among others. During Waldron's period as house pianist for Prestige Records
Prestige Records
in the late 1950s, he appeared on dozens of albums and composed for many of them, including writing his most famous song, "Soul Eyes", for Coltrane. Waldron was often an accompanist for vocalists, and was Billie Holiday's regular accompanist from April 1957 until her death in July 1959. A breakdown caused by a drug overdose in 1963 left Waldron unable to play or remember any music; he regained his skills gradually, while redeveloping his speed of thought. He left the U.S
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AllMusic
AllMusic (previously known as All Music Guide or AMG) is an online music guide. The largest music database on the web, it catalogs more than 3 million album entries and 30 million tracks. It was launched in 1991, predating the World Wide Web.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 The All Music Guide series 3 Reception 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] AllMusic was launched as All Music Guide by Michael Erlewine, a "compulsive archivist, noted astrologer, Buddhist scholar and musician." He became interested in using computers for his astrological work in the mid-'70s, and founded a software company, Matrix, in 1977. In the early '90s, as CDs replaced vinyl as the prevalent format for recorded music, Erlewine purchased what he thought was a CD of early recordings by Little Richard
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Drum Kit
A drum kit — also called a drum set, trap set, or simply drums — is a collection of drums and other percussion instruments, typically cymbals, which are set up on stands to be played by a single player,[1] with drumsticks held in both hands, and the feet operating pedals that control the hi-hat cymbal and the beater for the bass drum. A drum kit consists of a mix of drums (categorized classically as membranophones, Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 2) and idiophones - most significantly cymbals, but can also include the woodblock and cowbell (classified as Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 1).[2] In the 2000s, some kits also include electronic instruments ( Hornbostel-Sachs classification 53)
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Pierre Favre
Saint
Saint
Peter Faber
Peter Faber
SJ (French: Pierre Lefevre or Favre, Spanish: Pedro Fabro, Latin: Petrus Faver) (13 April 1506 – 1 August 1546) was the first Jesuit
Jesuit
priest and theologian, who was also a co-founder of the Society of Jesus. Pope Francis
Pope Francis
announced his canonization on 17 December 2013.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Jesuit
Jesuit
preacher 1.3 Death2 Writings 3 Veneration 4 Legacy 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife[edit] Early life[edit] Faber was born in 1506 to a peasant family in the village of Villaret, in the Duchy of Savoy
Duchy of Savoy
(now Saint-Jean-de-Sixt
Saint-Jean-de-Sixt
in the French Department of Haute-Savoie)
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Double Bass
The double bass, or simply the bass (and numerous other names), is the largest and lowest-pitched bowed string instrument in the modern symphony orchestra. It is a transposing instrument and is typically notated one octave higher than tuned to avoid excessive ledger lines below the staff. The double bass is the only modern bowed string instrument that is tuned in fourths (like a viol), rather than fifths, with strings usually tuned to E1, A1, D2 and G2. The instrument's exact lineage is still a matter of some debate, with scholars divided on whether the bass is derived from the viol or the violin family. The double bass is a standard member of the orchestra's string section,[1] as well as the concert band, and is featured in concertos, solo and chamber music[2] in Western classical music
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Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
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Scott Yanow
Scott Yanow (born October 4, 1954) is an American jazz reviewer, historian, and author.[1][2][3]Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Scott Yanow was born in New York City
New York City
and grew up near Los Angeles.[1][4] Since 1975 he had been a regular reviewer of many jazz styles, and was the jazz editor for Record Review. He has written for many jazz and arts magazines, including JazzTimes, Jazziz, Down Beat, Cadence, CODA and the Los Angeles Jazz
Jazz
Scene
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Music Genre
A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions.[1] It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably.[2][not in citation given] Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.[3] Music
Music
can be divided into different genres in many different ways. The artistic nature of music means that these classifications are often subjective and controversial, and some genres may overlap. There are even varying academic definitions of the term genre itself. In his book Form in Tonal Music, Douglass M. Green distinguishes between genre and form. He lists madrigal, motet, canzona, ricercar, and dance as examples of genres from the Renaissance period. To further clarify the meaning of genre, Green writes, "Beethoven's Op. 61 and Mendelssohn's Op
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Live Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Black Glory
Black
Black
is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light. It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white (its opposite) and gray.[1] It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.[2] Black
Black
ink is the most common color used for printing books, newspapers and documents, because it has the highest contrast with white paper and is the easiest to read. For the same reason, black text on a white screen is the most common format used on computer screens.[3] In color printing it is used along with the subtractive primaries cyan, yellow, and magenta, in order to help produce the darkest shades. Black
Black
and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the "Dark Ages" versus Age of Enlightenment
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Record Producer
A record producer or track producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album.[1] A producer has many roles during the recording process.[2] The roles of a producer vary. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also:Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos Co-write.[3] Propose changes to the song arrangements, and Coach the singers and musicians in the studioThe producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage
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Record Label
A record label or record company is a brand or trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. Sometimes, a record label is also a publishing company that manages such brands and trademarks, coordinates the production, manufacture, distribution, marketing, promotion, and enforcement of copyright for sound recordings and music videos; also conducting talent scouting and development of new artists ("artists and repertoire" or "A&R"); and maintains contracts with recording artists and their managers
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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