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Mahadevi
In Hinduism, Mahadevi
Mahadevi
(Sanskrit: Mahādevī, Devanagari: महादेवी) or "Great Goddess" is the goddess or devi that is the sum of all other devis – an all-encompassing female deity as the consort or complement to an all-encompassing male deity (deva) or the Ultimate Reality
Reality
(Brahman) in Shaktism. She is often identified with a specific goddess, the most common being Durga, Adi Parashakti, Kali
Kali
or Mahakali. Adi Parashakti
Adi Parashakti
or Mahadevi, the Supreme power, is called Durga
Durga
Shakti
Shakti
as per Devi-Mahatmya. Mahadevi
Mahadevi
(as Tridevi) is the supreme force that creates, preserves, and destroys the universe. She is the highest intelligence referred as Brahmavidya. Mahadevi
Mahadevi
is the soul of the universe and the universe itself
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Goddess
A goddess is a female deity.[1] Goddesses have been linked with virtues such as beauty, love, motherhood and fertility (Mother-goddess cult in prehistoric times). They have also been associated with ideas such as war, creation, and death. In some faiths, a sacred female figure holds a central place in religious prayer and worship. For example, Shaktism, the worship of the female force that animates the world, is one of the three major sects of Hinduism
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Radha
Radha
Radha
(IAST: Rādhā), also called Radhika, Radharani, and Radhe, is a Hindu
Hindu
goddess popular in the Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition. She is a milkmaid (gopi), the lover of the Hindu
Hindu
god Krishna
Krishna
in the medieval era texts.[4][5] She is also a part of Shaktism
Shaktism
– the Hindu
Hindu
goddess tradition, and considered an avatar of Lakshmi.[6][7][1] Radha
Radha
is worshipped in some regions of India, particularly by Vaishnavas in West Bengal, Assam, Manipur and Odisha
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Sita
Sita
Sita
(pronounced [ˈsiː t̪aː]  listen (help·info), Sanskrit: सीता, IAST: Sītā) or Seeta, is the consort of Lord Rama
Rama
(incarnation of Vishnu) and an avatar of Sri Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess that denotes good sign, good fortune, prosperity, success, and happiness. She is esteemed as the paragon of spousal and feminine virtues for all women.[6] Sita
Sita
is the central female character and one of the central figures in the Hindu
Hindu
epic, the Ramayana. She is described as the daughter of the earth goddess, Bhūmi
Bhūmi
and the adopted daughter of King Janaka
Janaka
of Videha
Videha
and his wife, Queen Sunaina
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Devanagari
Devanagari
Devanagari
(/ˌdeɪvəˈnɑːɡəri/ DAY-və-NAH-gə-ree; देवनागरी, IAST: Devanāgarī, a compound of "deva" दे
and "nāgarī" नागरी; Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: [d̪eːʋˈnaːɡri]), also called Nagari (Nāgarī, नागरी),[5] is an abugida (alphasyllabary) used in India
India
and Nepal
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Shakti
Shakti
Shakti
(Devanagari: शक्ति, IAST: Śakti; .lit “power, ability, strength, might, effort, energy, capability”[1]), is the primordial cosmic energy and represents the dynamic forces that are thought to move through the entire universe[2] in Hinduism
Hinduism
and Shaktism. Shakti
Shakti
is the concept or personification of divine feminine creative power, sometimes referred to as “The Great Divine Mother” in Hinduism. As a mother, she is known as “Adi Shakti” or “Adi Parashakti”. On the earthly plane, Shakti
Shakti
most actively manifests through female embodiment and creativity/fertility, though it is also present in males in its potential, unmanifest form.[3] Hindus believe that Shakti
Shakti
is both responsible for creation and the agent of all change
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Mother Goddess
A mother goddess is a goddess who represents, or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth
Earth
or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth
Earth
or as the Earth
Earth
Mother. There is difference of opinion between the academic and the popular conception of the term. The popular view is mainly driven by the Goddess
Goddess
movement and reads that primitive societies initially were matriarchal, worshipping a sovereign, nurturing, motherly earth goddess. This was based upon the nineteenth-century ideas of unilineal evolution of Johann Jakob Bachofen
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Reality
Reality
Reality
is the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.[1] Reality
Reality
includes everything that is and has been, whether or not it is observable or comprehensible. A still broader definition includes that which has existed, exists, or will exist. Philosophers, mathematicians, and other ancient and modern thinkers, such as Aristotle, Plato, Frege, Wittgenstein, and Russell, have made a distinction between thought corresponding to reality, coherent abstractions (thoughts of things that are imaginable but not real), and that which cannot even be rationally thought
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Vahana
Vahana
Vahana
(Sanskrit: वाहन, Vāhana, literally "that which carries, that which pulls") denotes the being, typically an animal or mythical entity, a particular Hindu deity is said to use as a vehicle. In this capacity, the vahana is often called the deity's "mount". Upon the partnership between the deity and his vahana is woven much iconography and mythology. Deities are often depicted riding (or simply mounted upon) the vahana. Other times, the vahana is depicted at the deity's side or symbolically represented as a divine attribute. The vahana may be considered an accoutrement[1] of the deity: though the vahana may act independently, they are still functionally emblematic or even syntagmatic of their "rider". The deity may be seen sitting or standing on the vahana
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Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
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Deity
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
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Shiva
Shiva
Shiva
(/ˈʃiːvə, ˈʃɪ-/; Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the Supreme Being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva
Shiva
is the "destroyer of evil and the transformer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu
Hindu
trinity that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism
Shaivism
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
is the Supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[13][14][15] In the goddess tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
called Shaktism, the goddess is described as supreme, yet Shiva
Shiva
is revered along with Vishnu
Vishnu
and Brahma
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Sachi
In Hinduism
Hinduism
(specifically, early Vedic accounts), Shachi
Shachi
(Sanskrit: शची; also known as Indrani (queen of Indra), Aindri, Mahendri, Pulomaja and Poulomi is the goddess of wrath and jealousy; being a source of jealously for long because there was no one who did not long for her, and a daughter of Puloman, an Asura
Asura
who was killed by Indrani's future husband, Indra. She is one of the seven Matrikas (mother goddesses). She is described as beautiful and having the most beautiful eyes. She is associated with lions and elephants. With Indra, she is the mother of Jayanta
Jayanta
and Jayanti and Midhusa, Nilambara, Rbhus, Rsabha
Rsabha
and Chitragupta. In Hindu epics, she is also described as "The Endless Beauty". Goddess Shachi
Shachi
or Indrani is one of the Sapta Matrikas—the seven divine mothers or Saptamatris in Hindu religion
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