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Magpul PDR
The Magpul
Magpul
PDR (Personal Defense Rifle) is a prototype bullpup-style 5.56×45mm NATO
5.56×45mm NATO
carbine unveiled by Magpul Industries
Magpul Industries
in 2006. Although halted in development as of 2011 it has garnered some attention, largely due to its "futuristic" appearance. The system consists of a gas-operated bullpup carbine intended to replace some submachine guns, M9 pistols and M4 carbines while still offering the rapid fire and range of a M4 carbine
M4 carbine
in an ultra compact firearm. The PDR is one of the few personal defense weapons designed to use a standard caliber to simplify the logistics. The method of operation is a short stroke gas piston
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M4 Carbine
The M4 carbine
M4 carbine
is a shorter and lighter variant of the M16A2 assault rifle. The M4 is a 5.56×45mm NATO, air-cooled, direct impingement gas-operated, magazine-fed carbine. It has a 14.5 in (370 mm) barrel and a telescoping stock. The M4 carbine
M4 carbine
is extensively used by the United States
United States
Armed Forces and is largely replacing the M16 rifle
M16 rifle
in United States Army
United States Army
and United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps
combat units as the primary infantry weapon.[7][8] The M4 is also capable of mounting the M203 and M320 grenade launchers. The distinctive step in its barrel is for mounting the M203 with the standard hardware
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Pistol
A pistol is a type of handgun. The pistol originates in the 16th century, when early handguns were produced in Europe. The English word was introduced in ca. 1570 from the Middle French pistolet (ca. 1550). The most common types of pistol are the single shot, and semi-automatic.Contents1 Terminology 2 History and etymology 3 Action3.1 Single shot 3.2 Multi-barreled (non-rotating) 3.3 Harmonica pistol 3.4 Revolver 3.5 Semi-automatic4 ReferencesTerminology[edit] Some handgun experts and dictionaries make a technical distinction that views pistols as a subset of handguns; others use the terms interchangeably
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Steyr TMP
The Steyr TMP (Taktische Maschinenpistole/Tactical Machine Pistol) is a select-fire 9×19mm Parabellum caliber machine pistol manufactured by Steyr Mannlicher of Austria. The magazines come in 15-, 20-, or 30-round detachable box types. A suppressor can also be fitted. In 2001, Steyr sold the design to Brügger & Thomet,[2] who developed it into the Brügger & Thomet MP9.[3]Contents1 SPP 2 Users 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksSPP[edit] The Steyr SPP (Special Purpose Pistol) is a semi-automatic variant of the TMP. The TMP's barrel and barrel jacket lengths were increased slightly so there is a greater length of protruding jacket and barrel. The forward tactical pistol grip was also removed
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M9 Pistol
The Beretta
Beretta
M9, officially the Pistol, Semiautomatic, 9mm, M9, is the designation for the Beretta
Beretta
92FS semi-automatic pistol by the United States Armed Forces. The M9 was adopted by the United States' military as their service pistol in 1985. The M9 won a competition in the 1980s to replace the M1911A1 as the primary sidearm of the U.S. military, beating many other contenders, and only narrowly defeating the SIG P226
SIG P226
for cost reasons.[1] It officially entered service in 1990.[2] Some other models have been adopted to a lesser extent, namely the M11 pistol, and other models remain in use in certain niches. The M9 was scheduled to be replaced under a United States Army program, the Future Handgun
Handgun
System (FHS), which was merged with the SOF Combat Pistol program to create the Joint Combat Pistol
Joint Combat Pistol
(JCP)
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Submachine Gun
A submachine gun (SMG) is a magazine-fed, automatic carbine designed to fire pistol cartridges. The term "submachine gun" was coined by John T. Thompson, the inventor of the Thompson submachine gun.[1] The submachine gun was developed during World War I
World War I
(1914–1918). At its zenith during World War II
World War II
(1939–1945), millions of SMGs were made
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Carbine
A carbine (/ˈkɑːrbiːn/ or /ˈkɑːrbaɪn/),[1] from French carabine,[2] is a long gun firearm but with a shorter barrel than a rifle or musket.[3] Many carbines are shortened versions of full-length rifles, shooting the same ammunition, while others fire lower-powered ammunition, including types designed for pistols. The smaller size and lighter weight of carbines make them easier to handle. They are typically issued to high-mobility troops such as special-operations soldiers and paratroopers, as well as to mounted, artillery, logistics, or other non-infantry personnel whose roles do not require full-sized rifles, although there is a growing tendency for carbines to be issued to front-line soldiers to offset the increasing weight of other issued equipment
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Picatinny Rail
The Picatinny rail
Picatinny rail
(/ˈpɪkətɪni/ or /ˌpɪkəˈtɪni/), or Pic rail for short, also known as a MIL-STD-1913 rail, or Standardization Agreement 2324 rail, is a mil-spec firearm rail interface system that provides a standard accessory mounting platform consisting of a hexagonal rail with multiple transverse slots, similar in concept to the earlier commercial Weaver rail mount
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List Of Carbines
A carbine (/ˈkɑːrbiːn/ or /ˈkɑːrbaɪn/),[1] from French carabine,[2] is a long arm firearm but with a shorter barrel than a rifle or musket.[3] Many carbines are shortened versions of full-length rifles, shooting the same ammunition, while others fire lower-powered ammunition, including types designed for pistols. Below is the list of carbines
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Iron Sight
Iron sights
Iron sights
are a system of shaped alignment markers (usually metal) used as a sighting device to assist in the aiming of a device such as a firearm, crossbow, or telescope, and exclude the use of optics as in reflector (reflex) sights, holographic sights, and telescopic sights.[1] Iron sights
Iron sights
are typically composed of two component sights, formed by metal blades: a rear sight mounted perpendicular to the line of sight and a front sight that is a post, bead, or ring. Open sights use a notch of some sort as the rear sight, while aperture sights use some form of a circular hole. Civilian, hunting, and police firearms usually feature open sights, while many military battle rifles employ aperture sights. The earliest and simplest iron sights are fixed and cannot be easily adjusted
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Rotating Bolt
Rotating bolt
Rotating bolt
is a method of locking used in firearms. Johann Nicolaus von Dreyse developed the first rotating bolt firearm, the "Dreyse needle gun" in 1836. The Dreyse locked using the bolt handle rather than lugs on the bolt head like the Mauser M 98
Mauser M 98
or M16. The first rotating bolt rifle with two lugs on the bolt head was the Lebel Model 1886 rifle. The concept has been implemented on most firearms chambered for high powered cartridges since the 20th century. Design[edit] Ferdinand Ritter von Mannlicher, who had earlier developed a non-rotating bolt straight-pull rifle, developed the Steyr-Mannlicher M1895, a straight-pull rifle with a rotating bolt, which was issued to the Austro-Hungarian Army. Mannlicher then developed the M1893 auto rifle which had a screw delayed bolt and later the Mannlicher M1900 operated by a gas piston
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Gas-operated Reloading
Gas-operation is a system of operation used to provide energy to operate autoloading firearms. In gas operation, a portion of high-pressure gas from the cartridge being fired is used to power a mechanism to extract the spent case and insert a new cartridge into the chamber. Energy from the gas is harnessed through either a port in the barrel or a trap at the muzzle. This high-pressure gas impinges on a surface such as a piston head to provide motion for unlocking of the action, extraction of the spent case, ejection, cocking of the hammer or striker, chambering of a fresh cartridge, and locking of the action
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Action (firearms)
In firearms terminology, an action is the mechanism that handles the ammunition (loads, locks, fires, extracts and ejects) or the method by which that mechanism works. Breech-loading weapons have actions; actions are technically not present on muzzleloaders, as all are single-shot weapons with a closed off breech. Actions can be categorized in several ways, including single action versus double action, break action versus bolt action, and others. The term action can also include short, long, and magnum if it is in reference to the length of the rifle’s receiver and the length of the bolt. The short action rifle usually can accommodate a cartridge length of 2.8 in (71 mm) or smaller
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Caliber
In guns, particularly firearms, caliber or calibre is the approximate internal diameter of the gun barrel, or the diameter of the projectile it shoots. It is measured in hundredths or thousandths of an inch or in millimetres. For example, a ".45 caliber" firearm has a barrel diameter of roughly 0.45 inches (11 mm). Barrel diameters can also be expressed using metric dimensions. For example, a "9mm pistol" has a barrel diameter of about 9 millimetres (it is rare for the actual barrel diameter to precisely match the designation however, and the bullet itself is yet another dimension). When the barrel diameter is given in inches, the abbreviation "cal" (for "caliber") can be used
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5.56×45mm NATO
The 5.5 6×45mm
6×45mm
NATO
NATO
(official NATO
NATO
nomenclature 5.56 NATO) is a rimless bottlenecked intermediate cartridge family developed in Belgium by FN Herstal.[4] It consists of the SS109, SS110, and SS111 cartridges
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Cartridge (firearms)
A cartridge is a type of firearm ammunition packaging a projectile (bullet, shots or slug), a propellant substance (usually either smokeless powder or black powder) and an ignition device (primer) in a metallic, paper or plastic cartridge that fits the barrel chamber of a breechloading gun, for the practical purpose of convenient transportation and shooting.[1] Although in popular usage the term "bullet" is often used to refer to a complete cartridge, it is correctly used only to refer to the projectile. Cartridges can be categorized by the type of their primers — a small charge of an impact- or electric-sensitive chemical mixture that is located at the center of the case head (centerfire), inside the rim of the case base (rimfire and the now obsolete cupfire), in a sideway projection that is shaped like pin (pinfire, now obsolete) or a lip (lipfire, now obsolete), or in a small nipple-like bulge at the case base (teat-fire, now obsolete). Military and commercial producers continue t
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