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Magazines
A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published (sometimes referred to as an online magazine). Magazines are generally published on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three. At its root, the word "magazine" refers to a collection or storage location. In the case of written publication, it is a collection of written articles
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Ottoman Turkish Language
Ottoman Turkish (/ˈɒtəmən/; Turkish: Osmanlı Türkçesi), or the Ottoman language (Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانى‎, lisân-ı Osmânî, also known as تركجه‎, Türkçe or تركی‎, Türkî, "Turkish"; Turkish: Osmanlıca), is the variety of the Turkish language
Turkish language
that was used in the Ottoman Empire. It borrows, in all aspects, extensively from Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and it was written in the Ottoman Turkish alphabet
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Lloyd's List
Lloyd's List is one of the world's oldest continuously running journals, having provided weekly shipping news in London as early as 1734. It was published daily until 2013 (when issue 60,850 was published), and in constantly updated digital format only since then. Known simply as The List, it was begun by the proprietor of Lloyd's Coffee House in the City of London, England as a reliable and concise source of information for the merchants' agents and insurance underwriters who met regularly in his establishment in Lombard Street to negotiate insurance coverage for trading vessels.[1] The digital version, updated hour-to-hour,[2] and used internationally, continues to fulfil a similar purpose
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Journal Des Sçavans
The Journal des sçavans
Journal des sçavans
(later renamed Journal des savants), established by Denis de Sallo, was the earliest academic journal published in Europe. Its content included obituaries of famous men, church history, and legal reports.[1] The first issue appeared as a twelve-page quarto pamphlet[2] on Monday, 5 January 1665.[3] This was shortly before the first appearance of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, on 6 March 1665.[4] The 18th-century French physician and encyclopédiste Louis-Anne La Virotte (1725–1759) was introduced to the journal through the protection of chancellor Henri François d'Aguesseau. The journal ceased publication in 1792, during the French Revolution, and, although it very briefly reappeared in 1797 under the updated title Journal des savants, it did not re-commence regular publication until 1816
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La Gazette (France)
La Gazette (French pronunciation: ​[la ɡazɛt]), originally Gazette de France, was the first weekly magazine published in France. It was founded by Théophraste Renaudot
Théophraste Renaudot
and published its first edition on 30 May 1631. It progressively became the mouthpiece of one royalist faction, the Legitimists.[1] With the rise of modern news media and specialized and localized newspapers throughout the country in the early 20th century, La Gazette was finally discontinued in 1915.Contents1 During the Ancien Régime 2 During the Revolution 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 BibliographyDuring the Ancien Régime[edit] Before the advent of the printed Gazette, reports on current events usually circulated as hand-written papers (nouvelles à la main)
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Jean Loret
Jean Loret
Jean Loret
(ca 1600-1665) was a French writer and poet known for publishing the weekly news of Parisian society (including, initially, its pinnacle, the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
itself) from 1650 until 1665 in verse in what he called a gazette burlesque.[1] He is sometimes referred
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Jean-Paul Marat
Jean-Paul Marat
Jean-Paul Marat
(French: [ʒɑ̃pɔl maʁa]; 24 May 1743 – 13 July 1793) was a French political theorist, physician, and scientist[1] who became best known for his role as a radical journalist and politician during the French Revolution. His journalism became renowned for its fierce tone, uncompromising stance towards the new leaders and institutions of the revolution, and advocacy of basic human rights for the poorest members of society, yet calling for prisoners of the Revolution to be killed before they could be freed in what became known as the September Massacres.[2] He was one of the most radical voices of the French Revolution
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L'Ami Du Peuple
L'Ami du peuple
L'Ami du peuple
(French: [lami dy pœpl], The Friend of the People) was a newspaper written by Jean-Paul Marat
Jean-Paul Marat
during the French Revolution. “The most celebrated radical paper of the Revolution”, according to historian Jeremy D. Popkin,[1] L’Ami du peuple was a vocal advocate for the rights of the lower classes against those Marat believed to be enemies of the people, which he had no hesitation mentioning in his writings. These papers were considered dangerous because they often ignited violent and rebellious behavior.Contents1 Inception 2 Early struggles 3 Marat's time in National Convention 4 Impact and influence 5 In Marat's own words 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksInception[edit] As an elector for the District of the Carmes Déchaussés in 1789, Marat tried to persuade the electoral assembly to publish a journal to keep their electorate informed of current political events
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Quartering (heraldry)
Quartering in heraldry is a method of joining several different coats of arms together in one shield by dividing the shield into equal parts and placing different coats of arms in each division.Simple quartering, crudely drawn. De Salis quartered with Fane.The flag of Maryland has a quartering of the coats of arms of the Calvert and Crossland familiesTypically, a quartering consists of a division into four equal parts, two above and two below (party per cross). An example is the Sovereign Arms of the United Kingdom, as used outside Scotland, which consists of four quarterings, displaying the Arms of England, Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, with the coat for England
England
repeated at the end
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Mahmud II
Mahmud II
Mahmud II
(Ottoman Turkish: محمود ثانى Mahmud-u sānī, محمود عدلى Mahmud-u Âdlî) (Turkish: İkinci Mahmut) (20 July 1785 – 1 July 1839) was the 30th Sultan
Sultan
of the Ottoman Empire from 1808 until his death in 1839. His reign is recognized for the extensive administrative, military, and fiscal reforms he instituted, which culminated into the Decree of Tanzimat
Tanzimat
("reorganization") that was carried out by his sons Abdulmejid I
Abdulmejid I
and Abdülaziz. Often described as " Peter the Great
Peter the Great
of Turkey",[1] Mahmud's reforms included the 1826 abolition of the conservative Janissary
Janissary
corps, which removed a major obstacle to his and his successors' reforms in the Empire
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Government Gazette
A government gazette (official gazette, official journal, official newspaper or official bulletin) is a periodical publication that has been authorised to publish public or legal notices. It is usually established by statute or official action and publication of notices within it, whether by the government or a private party, is usually considered sufficient to comply with legal requirements for public notice.[1] Gazettes are published either in print, electronically, or both. Publication within privately owned periodicals[edit] In some jurisdictions, privately owned newspapers may also register with the public authorities in order to publish public and legal notices.[2][3][4] Likewise, a private newspaper may be designated by the courts for publication of legal notices, such as notices of fictitious business names
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World Wide Web
The World Wide Web
World Wide Web
(abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet.[1] English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1989
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Trade Magazine
Trade
Trade
involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money. A system or network that allows trade is called a market. The original form of trade, barter, saw the direct exchange of goods and services for other goods and services.[1][need quotation to verify] Barter
Barter
involves trading things without the use of money.[1] Later one bartering party started to involve precious metals, which gained symbolic as well as practical importance. Modern traders generally negotiate through a medium of exchange, such as money. As a result, buying can be separated from selling, or earning. The invention of money (and later credit, paper money and of non-physical money) greatly simplified and promoted trade
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Mail
The mail or post is a system for physically transporting postcards, letters, and parcels.[1] A postal service can be private or public, though many governments place restrictions on private systems. Since the mid-19th century, national postal systems have generally been established as government monopolies with a fee on the article prepaid. Proof of payment is often in the form of adhesive postage stamps, but postage meters are also used for bulk mailing. Modern private postal systems are typically distinguished from national postal agencies by the names "courier" or "delivery service". Postal authorities often have functions other than transporting letters. In some countries, a postal, telegraph and telephone (PTT) service oversees the postal system, in addition to telephone and telegraph systems
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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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