HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Madrasian Culture
The Madrasian culture is a prehistoric archaeological culture of India, dated to the Lower Paleolithic, the earliest subdivision of the Stone Age.[1][2] It belongs to the Acheulian industry, and some scholars consider the distinction between the Madrasian and the broader, regional Acheulian tradition defunct.[3][4] The culture is characterized by bifacial handaxes and cleavers,[5] but also includes flake tools, microliths and other chopping tools. Most were made from quartzite.[6] The Madrasian was named for its type site of Attirampakkam, near to the city of Madras (now known as Chennai), discovered by British archaeologist and geologist Robert Bruce Foote
Robert Bruce Foote
in 1863.[2][3] The oldest tools at Attirampakkam have been dated to 1.5 million years ago using cosmic-ray exposure dating.[7] See also[edit]South Asian Stone Age Soanian
Soanian
cultureReferences[edit]^ Armand, J (1985)
[...More...]

"Madrasian Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Archaeological Culture
An archaeological culture is a recurring assemblage of artifacts from a specific time and place that may constitute the material culture remains of a particular past human society. The connection between the artifacts is based on archaeologists' understanding and interpretation and does not necessarily relate to real groups of humans in the past. The concept of archaeological culture is fundamental to culture-historical archaeology.Contents1 Concept1.1 Terminology2 Development 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksConcept[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Different cultural groups have material culture items that differ both functionally and aesthetically due to varying cultural and social practices. This notion is observably true on the broadest scales
[...More...]

"Archaeological Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soanian
The Soanian
Soanian
is an archaeological culture of the Lower Paleolithic
Lower Paleolithic
in the Siwalik region of the Indian subcontinent.[1] Contemporary to the Acheulean, it is named after the Soan Valley in Pakistan. Soanian sites are found along the Sivalik region in present-day India, Nepal and Pakistan.[2]Contents1 Findings 2 Spread across Shivalik Hills region 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksFindings[edit]ChauntraKhasala KalanSivalik HillsSoan RiverMap of the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
showing important sites of the Soanian culture.The term "Soan Culture" was first used by Hellmut De Terra in 1936,[3] but D. N
[...More...]

"Soanian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Surface Exposure Dating
Surface exposure dating is a collection of geochronological techniques for estimating the length of time that a rock has been exposed at or near Earth's surface. Surface exposure dating is used to date glacial advances and retreats, erosion history, lava flows, meteorite impacts, rock slides, fault scarps, cave development, and other geological events. It is most useful for rocks which have been exposed for between 10 years and 30,000,000 years.Contents1 Cosmogenic radionuclide dating 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksCosmogenic radionuclide dating[edit] The most common of these dating techniques is Cosmogenic radionuclide dating. Earth is constantly bombarded with primary cosmic rays, high energy charged particles — mostly protons and alpha particles
[...More...]

"Surface Exposure Dating" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robert Bruce Foote
Robert Bruce Foote
Robert Bruce Foote
(22 September 1834 – 29 December 1912) was a British geologist and archaeologist who conducted geological surveys of prehistoric locations in India
India
for the Geological Survey of India. Foote joined the Geological Survey of India
India
(GSI) on 29 December 1858 was posted in the Madras Presidency, Hyderabad region and Bombay. In 1887 he became a director of the GSI and on retiring in 1891, he joined the state of Baroda. In later life, he settled in Yercaud
Yercaud
where his father in law Reverend Peter Percival
Peter Percival
had worked and lived.[1] An interest in paleolithic life was inspired by the work of Joseph Prestwich in 1859. In 1863, the year after his archaeological survey began, he discovered the first conclusive Paleolithic
Paleolithic
stone tool (a hand axe) in India
[...More...]

"Robert Bruce Foote" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chennai
Chennai
Chennai
(/ˈtʃɛnaɪ/ ( listen); formerly known as Madras /məˈdrɑːs/ ( listen) or /-ˈdræs/[12]) is the capital of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Located on the Coromandel Coast
Coromandel Coast
off the Bay of Bengal, it is one of the biggest cultural, economic and educational centres in South India. According to the 2011 Indian census, it is the sixth-largest city and fourth-most populous urban agglomeration in India. The city together with the adjoining regions constitute the Chennai
Chennai
Metropolitan Area, which is the 36th-largest urban area by population in the world.[13] Chennai
Chennai
is among the most visited Indian cities by foreign tourists
[...More...]

"Chennai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
[...More...]

"India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Type Site
In archaeology a type site (also known as a type-site or typesite) is a site that is considered the model of a particular archaeological culture. For example, the type site of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A culture is Jericho, in the West Bank. A type site is also often the eponym (the site after which the culture is named). For example, the type site of the pre-Celtic/Celtic Bronze Age Hallstatt culture is the lakeside village of Hallstatt, Austria. In geology the term is used similarly for a site considered to be typical of a particular rock formation etc. A type site contains artifacts, in an assemblage, that are typical of that culture. Type sites are often the first or foundational site discovered about the culture they represent
[...More...]

"Type Site" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quartzite
Quartzite
Quartzite
(from German: Quarzit[1]) is a hard, non-foliated metamorphic rock which was originally pure quartz sandstone.[2][3] Sandstone
Sandstone
is converted into quartzite through heating and pressure usually related to tectonic compression within orogenic belts. Pure quartzite is usually white to grey, though quartzites often occur in various shades of pink and red due to varying amounts of iron oxide (Fe2O3)
[...More...]

"Quartzite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microlith
A microlith is a small stone tool usually made of flint or chert and typically a centimetre or so in length and half a centimetre wide. They were made by humans from around 35,000 to 3,000 years ago, across Europe, Africa, Asia
Asia
and Australia. The microliths were used in spear points and arrowheads. Microliths are produced from either a small blade (microblade) or a larger blade-like piece of flint by abrupt or truncated retouching, which leaves a very typical piece of waste, called a microburin
[...More...]

"Microlith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flake Tool
In archaeology, a flake tool is a type of stone tool that was used during the Stone Age that was created by striking a flake from a prepared stone core. People during prehistoric times often preferred these flake tools as compared to other tools because these tools were often easily made, could be made to be extremely sharp and could easily be repaired. Flake tools could be sharpened by retouch to create scrapers or burins. These tools were either made by flaking off small particles of flint or by breaking off a large piece and using that as a tool itself. These tools were able to be made by this "chipping" away effect due to the natural characteristic of stone. Stone is able to break apart when struck near the edge. Flake tools are created through flint knapping, a process of producing stone tools using lithic reduction. Lithic reduction is the removal of a lithic flake from a larger stone in order to reach the desired tool shape and size
[...More...]

"Flake Tool" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cleaver (tool)
In archaeology, a cleaver is a type of biface stone tool of the Lower Palaeolithic. Cleavers resemble hand axes in that they are large and oblong or U-shaped tools meant to be held in the hand. But, unlike hand axes, they have a wide, straight cutting edge running at right angles to the axis of the tool. Acheulean cleavers resemble handaxes but with the pointed end truncated away. Flake cleavers have a cutting edge created by a tranchet flake being struck from the primary surface.Contents1 Difference between Cleavers and Hand Axes 2 Cleavers in Africa 3 Cleavers in Europe 4 ReferencesDifference between Cleavers and Hand Axes[edit] Cleavers, found in many Acheulean assemblages such as Africa, were similar in size and manner of hand axes
[...More...]

"Cleaver (tool)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bifacial
A hand axe (or handaxe) is a prehistoric stone tool with two faces that is the longest-used tool in human history. It is usually made from flint or chert. It is characteristic of the lower Acheulean and middle Palaeolithic (Mousterian) periods. Its technical name (biface) comes from the fact that the archetypical model is generally bifacial Lithic flake and almond-shaped (amygdaloidal). Hand axes tend to be symmetrical along their longitudinal axis and formed by pressure or percussion. The most common hand axes have a pointed end and rounded base, which gives them their characteristic shape, and both faces have been knapped to remove the natural cortex, at least partially
[...More...]

"Bifacial" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.