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Madrasa
Madrasa
Madrasa
(Arabic: مدرسة‎, madrasah, pl. مدارس, madāris) is the Arabic
Arabic
word for any type of educational institution, whether secular or religious (of any religion), and whether a school, college, or university. The word is variously transliterated madrasah, medresa, madrassa, madraza, medrese, etc. In the West, the word usually refers to a specific type of religious school or college for the study of the Islamic religion, though this may not be the only subject studied
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Madras
Chennai
Chennai
(/ˈtʃɛnaɪ/ ( listen); formerly known as Madras /məˈdrɑːs/ ( listen) or /-ˈdræs/[12]) is the capital of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Located on the Coromandel Coast
Coromandel Coast
off the Bay of Bengal, it is one of the biggest cultural, economic and educational centres in South India. According to the 2011 Indian census, it is the sixth-largest city and fourth-most populous urban agglomeration in India. The city together with the adjoining regions constitute the Chennai
Chennai
Metropolitan Area, which is the 36th-largest urban area by population in the world.[13] Chennai
Chennai
is among the most visited Indian cities by foreign tourists
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Madraseh, Badakhshan
Madraseh is a village in Badakhshan Province
Badakhshan Province
in north-eastern Afghanistan.[1] See also[edit]Badakhshan ProvinceReferences[edit]^ "NGA GeoName Database". National Geospatial Intelligence Agency. Archived from the original on 2008-05-22. Retrieved 2008-05-27. This Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
location article is a stub
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Grand Imam Of Al-Azhar
The Grand Imam of al-Azhar (Arabic: الإمام الأكبر), also known as Grand Sheikh of al-Azhar (Arabic: شيخ الأزهر الشريف), currently Ahmed el-Tayeb, is a prestigious Sunni Islam title and a prominent official title in Egypt.[1] He is considered by some Muslims to be the highest authority in Sunni Islamic thought and Islamic jurisprudence[2] and holds a great influence on followers of the theological Ash'ari
Ash'ari
and Maturidi
Maturidi
traditions worldwide. The Grand Imam Heads the al-Azhar Mosque, and by extension al-Azhar University, and is responsible for official religious matters along with the Grand Mufti of Egypt. History of the title[edit] The title of the Grand Imam of al-Azhar was officially established in 1961
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Madraza (film)
Anabela Lattanzio Hernan AguilarProduction companiesKozen Films S.A. Aeroplano CineDistributed byWalt Disney Company (Argentina) Buena Vista InternationalRelease date25 May 2017 (2017-05-25)Running time94 minutesCountry ArgentinaLanguage SpanishThe Godmother (Spanish: Madraza) is a 2017 Argentine crime black comedy film directed, written, and produced by Hernan Aguilar. Madraza won the Best Feature Film Award in Sitges Film Festival 2017 Blood Window and won the Best Feature Film Award "Panambí de oro" at the Paraguay International Film Festival 2017. Using visually powerful action sequences and realistic performances, the film depicts the story of a simple housewife that becomes an assassin for money
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Principles Of Islamic Jurisprudence
A principle is a concept or value that is a guide for behavior or evaluation. In law, it is a rule that has to be, or usually is to be followed, or can be desirably followed, or is an inevitable consequence of something, such as the laws observed in nature or the way that a system is constructed
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Moharebeh
Ḥirābah (Arabic: حرابة‎) is an Arabic
Arabic
word for “piracy”, or “unlawful warfare”. Hirabah comes from the root ḥrb, which means “to become angry and enraged”. The noun ḥarb (حَرْب, pl
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Mustahabb
Mustahabb (Arabic: مستحبّ‎, lit. 'recommended') is an Islamic term
Islamic term
referring to recommended, favoured or virtuous actions. Mustahabb actions are those whose status of approval in Islamic law (ahkam) falls between mubah (neither encouraged nor discouraged) and wajib (compulsory). One definition is "duties recommended, but not essential; fulfilment of which is rewarded, though they may be neglected without punishment".[1] Synonyms of mustahabb include masnun and mandub. The opposite of mustahabb is makruh (discouraged).Contents1 Examples 2 References 3 See also 4 External linksExamples[edit] There are thousands of mustahabb acts,[2] including: As-Salamu Alaykum (a traditional Islamic greeting, Arabic for "peace be upon you") Sadaqah (charity outside of zakat) UmrahReferences[edit]^ Reuben Levy, The Social Structure of Islam, p. 202 ^ Turner, Colin (2013-12-19)
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Fasiq
Fasiq (Arabic: فاسق‎ fāsiq) is an Arabic term referring to someone who violates Islamic law. As a fasiq is considered unreliable, his testimony is not accepted in Islamic courts.[1] The terms fasiq and fisq are sometime rendered as "impious",[1] "venial sinner",[1] or "depraved".[2]Contents1 Origin 2 Theological debate 3 Applications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigin[edit] Fasiq is derived from the term fisq (Arabic: فسق‎), "breaking the agreement"[3] or "to leave or go out of."[2] In its original Quranic usage, the term did not have the specific meaning of a violator of laws, and was more broadly associated with kufr (disbelief).[4] Theological debate[edit]The jurist Wasil ibn Ata (700-748 CE) submitted that a fasiq remained a member of Muslim
Muslim
society, so retained rights to life and property though he could not hold a religious position
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Fitna (word)
Fitna (or fitnah, pl. fitan; Arabic: فتنة , فتن‎: "temptation, trial; sedition, civil strife"[1]) is an Arabic word with extensive connotations of trial, affliction, or distress. A word with important historical implications, it is also widely used in modern Arabic. One might distinguish between the meanings of fitna as used in Classical Arabic
Classical Arabic
and the meanings of fitna as used in Modern Standard Arabic and various colloquial dialects
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Haram
Haram (/ˈhɛərəm, ˈhær-/; Arabic: حَرَام‎ ḥarām [ħaˈraːm]) is an Arabic term meaning "forbidden".[1]:471 Thus it may refer to: either something sacred to which access is forbidden to the people who are not in a state of purity or who are not initiated into the sacred knowledge; or to an evil thus "sinful action that is forbidden to be done". The term also denotes something "set aside", thus being the Arabic equivalent of the Hebrew concept קָדוֹש‬ qadoš, and the concept of sacer (cf. sacred) in Roman law
Roman law
and religion
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Jihad
Jihad
Jihad
(English: /dʒɪˈhɑːd/; Arabic: جهاد‎ jihād [dʒɪˈhaːd]) is an Arabic
Arabic
word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim.[1][2][3][4] It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as struggle against one's evil inclinations, an exertion to conve
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Makruh
In Islamic
Islamic
terminology, something which is makruh (Arabic: مكروه, transliterated: makrooh or makrūh) is a disliked or offensive act (literally "detestable" or "abominable"[1]). It is one of the five categories (al-ahkam al-khamsa) in Islamic
Islamic
law -- wajib/fard (obligatory), Mustahabb/mandub (recommended), mubah (neutral), makruh (disapproved), haram (forbidden).[2] Though it is not haram (forbidden) or subject to punishment, a person who abstains from this act will be rewarded.[1] Muslims are encouraged to avoid such actions when or as possible
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Mubah
Mubah (Arabic: مباح) is an Arabic word meaning "permitted",[1] which has technical uses in Islamic law. In uṣūl al-fiqh (principles of Islamic jurisprudence), mubah is one of the five degrees of approval (ahkam), and is commonly translated as "neutral",[2][3] "indifferent"[4] or "(merely) permitted".[4][5] It refers to an action that is not mandatory, recommended, reprehensible or forbidden, and thus involves no judgement from God.[2] Assigning acts to this legal category reflects a deliberate choice rather than an oversight on the part of jurists.[3] In Islamic property law, the term mubah refers to things which have no owner. It is similar to the concept res nullius used in Roman law and common law.[6] See also[edit]HalalReferences[edit]^ Hans Wehr, J. Milton Cowan (1976). A Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic (3rd ed.). Spoken Language Services. p. 81.  ^ a b Vikør, Knut S. (2014). "Sharīʿah". In Emad El-Din Shahin
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Shaykh Al-Islām
Shaykh al-Islām
Shaykh al-Islām
(Arabic: شيخ الإسلام‎, Šayḫ al-Islām; Ottoman Turkish: Şeyḫülislām‎) was used in the classical era as an honorific title for outstanding scholars of the Islamic sciences.[1]:399[2] It first emerged in Khurasan
Khurasan
towards the end of the 4th Islamic century.[1]:399 In the central and western lands of Islam, it was an informal title given to jurists whose fatwas were particularly influential, while in the east it came to be conferred by rulers to ulama who played various official roles but were not generally muftis. Sometimes, as in the case of Ibn Taymiyya, the use of the title was subject to controversy
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Taghut
Taghut (ar. طاغوت, ṭāġūt, pl. ṭawāġīt) is an Islamic terminology denoting a focus of worship other than Allah. In traditional theology, the term often connotes idols, Satan
Satan
and jinn. The term is also applied to earthly tyrannical power, as implied in surah An-Nisa
An-Nisa
verse 60.[1] The modern Islamic philosopher
Islamic philosopher
Abul A'la Maududi defines taghut in his Qur'anic commentary as a creature who not only rebels against God
God
but transgresses his will.[2] Due to these associations, the term may refer to any person or group accused of being anti-Islamic and an agent of Western cultural imperialism
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