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Madam Yoko
Madam Yoko or Mammy Yoko (ca. 1849–1906[1]) was a leader of the Mende people
Mende people
in Sierra Leone. Combining advantageous lineage, shrewd marriage choices and the power afforded her from the secret Sande society, Yoko became a leader of considerable influence.[1][2] She expanded the Mende Kingdom and at the time of her death, she was the ruler of the vast Kpa Mende Confederacy.[3][4] Biography[edit] Madam Yoko, originally called Soma, was born around 1849 in the Gbo Chiefdom.[2][5] She changed her name to Yoko at her Sande initiation ceremony, during which time she became known for her graceful dancing.[2] Yoko's first marriage, which was unsuccessful, was to a man named Gongoima.[5][6] After leaving Gongoima, Yoko's second husband was Gbenjei, Chief of Taiama. Although Yoko remained childless, Gbenjei made her his great wife, giving her economic power within her household.[6][7] Following Gbenjei's death, Yoko married Gbanya Lango
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Sierra Leone
Coordinates: 8°30′N 11°30′W / 8.500°N 11.500°W / 8.500; -11.500 Republic
Republic
of Sierra LeoneFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Unity, Freedom, Justice"Anthem: High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the FreeLocation of  Sierra Leone  (dark blue) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Freetown 8°29.067′N 13°14.067′W / 8.484450°N 13.234450°W / 8.484450; -13.234450Official languages EnglishSpoken languagesTemne Mende KrioEthnic groups (2016)35% Temne 34% Mende 10% Fula 4% Limba 5% Kono 2% Krio (Creole) 2% Mandingo 2% Loko 6% othersDemonym Sierra LeoneanGovernment Unitary presidential constitutional republic• President Julius Maada Bio (SLPP)• Vice-PresidentMohamed Juldeh Jalloh (SLPP)• Speaker of ParliamentS.B.B
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Great Royal Wife
Great Royal Wife, or alternatively, Chief King's Wife (Ancient Egyptian: ḥmt nswt wrt), is the term that was used to refer to the principal wife of the pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, who served many official functions. A simplified form of the term, Great Wife, is applied to more contemporary royal consorts in states throughout modern Africa
Africa
(e.g., Mantfombi Dlamini of Swaziland, chief consort of the Zulu King).Contents1 Description 2 Great wives today 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Egypt3.1.1 Middle Kingdom 3.1.2 Second Intermediate Period 3.1.3 New Kingdom 3.1.4 Third Intermediate Period 3.1.5 Late Period3.2 Elsewhere in Africa4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] While most Ancient Egyptians were monogamous, a male pharaoh would have had other, lesser wives and concubines in addition to the Great Royal Wife
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Scarecrow Press
Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing house founded in 1949. Under several imprints, the company offers scholarly books and journals for the academic market, as well as trade books. Rowman & Littlefield is the world's largest publisher in museum studies. The company also owns the book distributing company National Book Network based in Lanham, Maryland. The current company took shape when University Press of America acquired Rowman & Littlefield in 1988 and took the Rowman & Littlefield name for the parent company
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Michelle Rosaldo
Michelle "Shelly" Zimbalist Rosaldo (1944 in New York City
New York City
– 1981 in Philippines) was a social, linguistic, and psychological anthropologist famous for her studies of the Ilongot people
Ilongot people
in the Philippines
Philippines
and for her pioneering role in women's studies and the anthropology of gender. Life[edit] Born in New York in 1944, Michelle Zimbalist attended Radcliffe College ( Harvard
Harvard
College's sister school, formally merged with Harvard in 1999), where she concentrated in English literature. She spent a summer among the Maya in southern Mexico
Mexico
as part of a field trip arranged by Evon Z. Vogt
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Stanford University Press
The Stanford University
Stanford University
Press (SUP) is the publishing house of Stanford University. In 1892, an independent publishing company was established at the university. The first use of the name "Stanford University Press" in a book's imprinting occurred in 1895. In 1917, the university bought the press, making it a division of Stanford. In 1999, the press became a division of the Stanford University Libraries
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University Of Illinois Press
The University of Illinois Press (UIP) is a major American university press and is part of the University of Illinois system. Founded in 1918, the press publishes some 120 new books each year, plus 33 scholarly journals, and several electronic projects. Strengths include ethnic and multicultural studies, Lincoln and Illinois history, and the large and diverse series Music in American Life.[3] See also[edit]Journals published by University of Illinois PressReferences[edit]^ "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved 2017-09-12.  ^ "UI Press International Sales Representation". Retrieved 2017-12-02.  ^ Jason Boog (3 June 2009). "Illinois UP Receives Lifetime Achievement Award". Mediabistro.com. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012
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Zed Books
Zed Books
Zed Books
is an independent non-fiction publishing company based in London, UK. It was founded in 1977 under the name Zed Press by Roger van Zwanenberg.[2] Zed publishes books for an international audience of both general and academic readers, covering areas such as politics and global current affairs, economics, gender studies and sexualities, development studies and the environment.Contents1 Zed today 2 Zed's authors 3 References 4 External linksZed today[edit] Zed Books' business model and structure are unique to the publishing industry.[3] It is the world's largest English-language publishing collective. The company is owned and managed as a non-hierarchical co-operative by its workers, without any shareholders
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UPNE
The University Press of New England (UPNE), located in Lebanon, New Hampshire and founded in 1970, is a university press consortium including Brandeis University, Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
(its host member), Tufts University, the University of New Hampshire, and Northeastern University. Notable fiction authors published by UPNE include Howard Frank Mosher, Roxana Robinson, Ernest Hebert, Cathie Pelletier, Chris Bohjalian, Percival Everett, Laurie Alberts and Walter D. Wetherell. Notable poets distributed by the press include Rae Armantrout, Claudia Rankine, James Tate, Mary Ruefle, Donald Revell, Ellen Bryant Voigt, James Wright, Jean Valentine, Stanley Kunitz, Heather McHugh, and Yusef Komunyakaa. Notable nature and environment authors published include William Sargent, Cynthia Huntington, David Gessner, John Hay, Tom Wessels and Eric Zencey. Notable scholarly authors published by UPNE and its members include Kathleen J
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James Currey Publishers
James Currey is an academic publisher specialising on Africa. It is named after its founder who established the company in 1984
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Greenwood Publishing Group
ABC-CLIO/Greenwood is an educational and academic publisher (middle school through university level) which is today part of ABC-CLIO. Established in 1967 as Greenwood Press, Inc. and based in Westport, Connecticut,[1] Greenwood Publishing Group publishes reference works under its Greenwood Press imprint, and scholarly, professional, and general interest books under its related imprint, Praeger Publishers. Also part of GPG is Libraries Unlimited, which publishes professional works for librarians and teachers.[2]Contents1 History 2 Subsidiaries2.1 Imprints 2.2 Former imprints 2.3 Former subsidiaries3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded as Greenwood Press, Inc. in 1967 by Harold Mason, a librarian and antiquarian bookseller, and Harold Schwartz who had a background in trade publishing
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Sande (society)
Sande, also known as zadεgi, bundu, bundo and bondo, is a women's secret society in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and the Ivory Coast. The Sande society initiates girls into adulthood by rituals including female genital mutilation.[1] It is alleged by its supporters to confer fertility, to instill notions of morality and proper sexual comportment, and to maintain an interest in the well-being of its members throughout their lives. In addition, Sande champions women's social and political interests and promotes their solidarity vis-a-vis the Poro, a complementary institution for men
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Mende People
The Mende people
Mende people
(also spelled Mendi) are one of the two largest ethnic groups in Sierra Leone; their neighbours, the Temne people, have roughly the same population. The Mende and Temne each account for slightly more than 30% of the total population [1]. The Mende are predominantly found in the Southern Province and the Eastern Province, while the Temne are found primarily in the Northern Province and the Western Area, including the capital city of Freetown. Some of the major cities with significant Mende populations include Bo, Kenema, Kailahun, and Moyamba. The Mende belong to a larger group of Mande peoples
Mande peoples
who live throughout West Africa. The Mende are mostly farmers and hunters. During the civil war the Civil Defense Force (CDF), a militia group, was founded by late Dr. Alpha Lavalie, a Mende himself, to fight the rebels along government troops
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Kpa Mende Confederacy
Madam Yoko or Mammy Yoko (ca. 1849–1906[1]) was a leader of the Mende people in Sierra Leone. Combining advantageous lineage, shrewd marriage choices and the power afforded her from the secret Sande society, Yoko became a leader of considerable influence.[1][2] She expanded the Mende Kingdom and at the time of her death, she was the ruler of the vast Kpa Mende Confederacy.[3][4] Biography[edit] Madam Yoko, originally called Soma, was born around 1849 in the Gbo Chiefdom.[2][5] She changed her name to Yoko at her Sande initiation ceremony, during which time she became known for her graceful dancing.[2] Yoko's first marriage, which was unsuccessful, was to a man named Gongoima.[5][6] After leaving Gongoima, Yoko's second husband was Gbenjei, Chief of Taiama. Although Yoko remained childless, Gbenjei made her his great wife, giving her economic power within her household.[6][7] Following Gbenjei's death, Yoko married Gbanya Lango
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