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Macerata
Macerata
Macerata
[matʃeˈraːta]  listen (help·info) is a city and comune in central Italy, the county seat of the province of Macerata in the Marche
Marche
region. Together with the modern town, sprawling on the plain below the historic centre, it has a population of about 43,000.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Subdivisions3 Climate 4 Main sights 5 Sferisterio Opera Festival 6 Macerata–Loreto pilgrimage 7 People 8 Twin towns 9 Sources 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Ricina The historical city centre is on a hill between the Chienti and Potenza rivers. It first consisted of the Picenes city named Ricina (Helvia Recina), then, after its romanization, Recina and Helvia Recina
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Cannibalism
Cannibalism
Cannibalism
is the act of one individual of a species consuming all or part of another individual of the same species as food. To consume the same species or show cannibalistic behavior is a common ecological interaction in the animal kingdom and has been recorded for more than 1,500 species.[1] Human cannibalism
Human cannibalism
is well-documented, both in ancient and recent times.[2] Cannibalism, however, does not—as once believed—occur only as a result of extreme food shortage or artificial/unnatural conditions, but could also occur under natural conditions in a variety of species.[1][3][4] Cannibalism
Cannibalism
seems to be especially prevalent in aquatic ecosystems, in which up to approximately 90% of the organisms engage in cannibalistic activity at some point in their life cycle
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Visigoth
The Visigoths
Visigoths
(UK: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɒθs/; US: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɑːθs/; Latin: Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Italian: Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.[2] These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period
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Francesco Solimena
Francesco Solimena
Francesco Solimena
(October 4, 1657 – April 3, 1747) was a prolific Italian painter of the Baroque
Baroque
era, one of an established family of painters and draughtsmen.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit]Diana and EndymionThe Royal Hunt of Dido and Aeneas Francesco Solimena
Francesco Solimena
was born in Canale di Serino, near Avellino. He received early training from his father, Angelo Solimena, with whom he executed a Paradise for the cathedral of Nocera (a place where he spent a big part of his life) and a Vision of St
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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Art School
An art school is an educational institution with a primary focus on the visual arts, including fine art, especially illustration, painting, photography, sculpture, and graphic design. Art schools are institutions with elementary, secondary, post-secondary or undergraduate, or part of a broad-based range of programs (such as the liberal arts and sciences)
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Art Gallery
An art museum or art gallery is a building or space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art. Museums can be public or private, but what distinguishes a museum is the ownership of a collection
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /ˈrɛnəsɑːns/)[a] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries and marking the transition from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to modernity. The traditional view focuses more on the early modern aspects of the Renaissance
Renaissance
and argues that it was a break from the past, but many historians today focus more on its medieval aspects and argue that it was an extension of the middle ages.[1][2] The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Arcade (architecture)
An arcade is a succession of arches, each counter-thrusting the next, supported by columns, piers, or a covered walkway enclosed by a line of such arches on one or both sides. In warmer or wet climates, exterior arcades provide shelter for pedestrians. The walkway may be lined with stores.[1] A blind arcade superimposes arcading against a solid wall.[2] Blind arcades are a feature of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
that influenced Gothic architecture. In the Gothic architectural tradition, the arcade can be located in the interior, in the lowest part of the wall of the nave, supporting the triforium and the clerestory in a cathedral,[3] or on the exterior, in which they are usually part of the walkways that surround the courtyard and cloisters. Many medieval arcades housed shops or stalls, either in the arcaded space itself, or set into the main wall behind
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Apennine Mountains
The Apennines[1] or Apennine Mountains
Apennine Mountains
(/ˈæpənaɪn/; Greek: Ἀπέννινα ὄρη;[2] Latin: Appenninus or Apenninus Mons—a singular used in the plural;[note 1] Italian: Appennini [appenˈniːni])[3] are a mountain range consisting of parallel smaller chains extending c. 1,200 km (750 mi) along the length of peninsular Italy. In the northwest they join with the Ligurian Alps
Ligurian Alps
at Altare. In the southwest they end at Reggio di Calabria, the coastal city at the tip of the peninsula
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Adriatic Sea
The Adriatic Sea
Sea
/ˌeɪdriˈætɪk/ is a body of water separating the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
from the Balkan peninsula. The Adriatic is the northernmost arm of the Mediterranean Sea, extending from the Strait of Otranto (where it connects to the Ionian Sea) to the northwest and the Po Valley. The countries with coasts on the Adriatic are Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Italy, Montenegro
Montenegro
and Slovenia. The Adriatic contains over 1,300 islands, mostly located along its eastern, Croatian coast. It is divided into three basins, the northern being the shallowest and the southern being the deepest, with a maximum depth of 1,233 metres (4,045 ft). The Otranto Sill, an underwater ridge, is located at the border between the Adriatic and Ionian Seas
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Lega Nord
Lega Nord
Lega Nord
(LN; English translation: "North League"), whose complete name is Lega Nord
Lega Nord
per l'Indipendenza della Padania
Padania
("North League for the Independence of Padania"), is a regionalist political party in Italy. The party is usually referred to as Northern League by English-language sources, while in Italy
Italy
it is also referred to simply as Lega or Carroccio. The LN was founded in 1991 as a federation of several regional parties of Northern and Central Italy, notably including Liga Veneta, Lega Lombarda, Piemont Autonomista, Uniun Ligure, Lega Emiliano-Romagnola and Alleanza Toscana. The party advocates the transformation of Italy
Italy
into a federal state, fiscal federalism and greater regional autonomy, especially for Northern regions
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Neo-nazism
Neo- Nazism
Nazism
consists of post- World War II
World War II
militant social or political movements seeking to revive and implement[1][2] the ideology of Nazism. It is a global phenomenon, with organized representation in many countries and international networks. It borrows elements from Nazi
Nazi
doctrine, including ultranationalism, racism up to xenophobia, ableism, homophobia, anti-Romanyism, antisemitism, anti-communism and initiating the Fourth Reich
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Comune
The comune (IPA: [koˈmune]; plural: comuni, IPA: [koˈmuni]) is a basic administrative division in Italy, roughly equivalent to a township or municipality.Contents1 Importance and function 2 Subdivisions 3 Homonymy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksImportance and function[edit] The comune provides many of the basic civil functions: registry of births and deaths, registry of deeds, and contracting for local roads and public works. It is headed by a mayor (sindaco) assisted by a legislative body, the consiglio comunale (communal council), and an executive body, the giunta comunale (communal committee). The mayor and members of the consiglio comunale are elected together by resident citizens: the coalition of the elected mayor (who needs an absolute majority in the first or second round of voting) gains three fifths of the consiglio's seats
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Murder For Body Parts
The murder of human beings for their body parts is a crime in all countries. Such practices have been confirmed or suspected to occur within a handful of contexts. Medicine murder (not to be confused with "medical murder" due to medical negligence) means the killing of a human being in order to excise body parts to use as medicine or for magical purposes in witchcraft. Medicine murder is not viewed as a form of human sacrifice in a religious sense, because the motivation is not the death of a human or the effecting of magical changes through the death of a human being, but the obtaining of an item or items from their corpse to be used in traditional medicine
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