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Mac Cecht
In Irish mythology, Mac Cecht (Irish pronunciation: [ˈmak ˈcəçt̪ˠ]) of the Tuatha Dé Danann
Tuatha Dé Danann
was a son of Cermait, son of the Dagda. Mac Cecht's given name was Téthur and he was named Mac Cecht after his god, Cecht, the ploughshare. His wife was Fodla, one of the three eponymous sister-goddesses of Ireland. He and his brothers Mac Cuill and Mac Gréine killed Lug in revenge for their father. The three brothers became joint High Kings of Ireland, rotating the sovereignty between them a year at a time, covering twenty-nine or thirty years depending on the source consulted
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Plough
A plough (UK) or plow (US; both /plaʊ/) is a tool or farm implement used in farming for initial cultivation of soil in preparation for sowing seed or planting to loosen or turn the soil. Ploughs were traditionally drawn by working animals such as horses or cattle, but in modern times are drawn by tractors. A plough may be made of wood, iron, or steel frame with an attached blade or stick used to cut the earth. It has been a basic instrument for most of recorded history, although written references to the plough do not appear in English until c. 1100 at which point it is referenced frequently. The plough represents one of the major agricultural inventions in human history. The primary purpose of ploughing is to turn over the upper layer of the soil, bringing fresh nutrients to the surface, while burying weeds and the remains of previous crops and allowing them to break down. As the plough is drawn through the soil it creates long trenches of fertile soil called furrows
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Ulster Cycle
The Ulster
Ulster
Cycle (Irish: an Rúraíocht),[1] formerly known as the Red Branch Cycle, one of the four great cycles of Irish mythology, is a body of medieval Irish heroic legends and sagas of the traditional heroes of the Ulaid
Ulaid
in what is now eastern Ulster
Ulster
and northern Leinster, particularly counties Armagh, Down and Louth, and taking place around or before the 1st century AD.Contents1 Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories 2 Texts 3 Texts in translation3.1 Online translations4 Adaptations 5 See also 6 References 7 External links Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories[edit] The Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories are set in and around the reign of King Conchobar mac Nessa, who rules the Ulaid
Ulaid
from Emain Macha
Macha
(now Navan Fort near Armagh)
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Seathrún Céitinn
Seathrún Céitinn (c. 1569 – c. 1644; known in English as Geoffrey Keating) was a 17th-century historian. He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and is buried in Tubrid
Tubrid
Graveyard in the parish of Ballylooby-Duhill, and became an Irish Catholic priest and a poet.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] It was generally believed until recently that Keating had been born in Burgess, County Tipperary; indeed, a monument to Keating was raised beside the bridge at Burgess, in 1990; but Diarmuid Ó Murchadha writes,The presumption that [Keating] attended a bardic school at Burgess, Co. Tipperary, is attributable to Thomas O'Sullevane, a shadowy character from the fringes of literary circles in London
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Brigid
Brigit, Brigid or Bríg (/ˈbrɪdʒɪd, ˈbriːɪd/; meaning 'exalted one')[1] was a goddess of pre-Christian Ireland. She appears in Irish mythology as a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann, the daughter of the Dagda
Dagda
and wife of Bres, with whom she had a son named Ruadán. It has been suggested that Brigid is a continuation of the Indo-European dawn goddess.[1] She is associated with the spring season, fertility, healing, poetry and smithcraft. Cormac's Glossary, written in the 10th century by Christian monks, says that Brigid was "the goddess whom poets adored" and that she had two sisters: Brigid the healer and Brigid the smith.[2][3] This suggests she may have been a triple deity.[4] Saint Brigid
Saint Brigid
shares many of the goddess's attributes and her feast day was originally a pagan festival (Imbolc) marking the beginning of spring
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Airmed
In Irish mythology, the goddess Airmed (also given as Airmid) was one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. With her father Dian Cecht and brother Miach, she healed those injured in the Second Battle of Magh Tuiredh.[1] After her jealous father slew her brother, Miach, Airmed wept over her brother's grave. Watered by her tears, all the healing herbs of the world (365 in number - according to the number of Miach's joints and veins)[2] sprung from the earth over Miach's body, and Airmed collected and organized them all, spreading them on her cloak. Once again, their father lashed out, and scattered the herbs. For this reason, no living human knows all the secrets of herbalism
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Badb
In Irish mythology, the Badb
Badb
(Old Irish, pronounced [ˈbaðβ]) or Badhbh (Modern Irish, pronounced [ˈbəiv])—meaning "crow"—is a war goddess who takes the form of a crow, and is thus sometimes known as Badb
Badb
Catha ("battle crow"). She is known to cause fear and confusion among soldiers to move the tide of battle to her favoured side. Badb
Badb
may also appear prior to a battle to foreshadow the extent of the carnage to come, or to predict the death of a notable person
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Bé Chuille
Bé Chuille, also known as Becuille and Bé Chuma, is one of the Tuatha Dé Danann
Tuatha Dé Danann
in Irish mythology. In a tale from the Metrical Dindshenchas, she is a good sorceress who joins three other of the Tuatha Dé to defeat the evil Greek witch Carman. According to the Book of Leinster (1150) Bé Chuille was killed, along with Dianann, by "gray demons of air." Becuille is often confused with Bechuma of the Fair Skin. In Echtrae Airt meic Cuinn (The Echtra, or Adventure, of Art mac Cuinn), Bechuma is the wife of Eogan Inbir, but commits adultery with Gaidiar, son of Manannán mac Lir, and is banished to the human world. Conn of the Hundred Battles marries her, but she becomes infatuated with his son Art. The druids inform Conn that Bechuma's wickedness has turned his realm into a Wasteland, and she is eventually exiled. References[edit]Gwynn, Edward (Ed) (1906). The Metrical Dindshenchas volume 3
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Bébinn
Bébinn /bɛˈviːn/ a.k.a. Bé Binn, is an early Irish name applied to a number of related and unrelated figures in Irish mythology. In some sources Bébhinn (old orthography: Béḃinn) is a goddess associated with birth and the sister of the river-goddess, Boann. Bébinn is also described as being an underworld goddess in both Irish and Welsh mythology, inhabiting either the Irish underworld Mag Mell or the Welsh Annwn, although it is unknown which is the original source.[1]Contents1 Etymology and variations 2 In mythology 3 In history 4 Bearers of the name 5 See also 6 External links 7 ReferencesEtymology and variations[edit] The name Bébinn seems to be a combination between medieval forms of the Irish Gaelic word for "woman", "bean" (pronounced "bahn"), and the adjective "melodious", "binn", literally translating to "melodious woman". Other versions of the name, such as Béfionn, instead pair "woman" with "fair"
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Boann
Boann
Boann
or Boand (modern spelling: Bóinn) is the Irish goddess of the River Boyne, a river in Leinster, Ireland. According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn and Tain Bo Fraech she was the sister of Befind[1] and daughter of Delbáeth, son of Elada, of the Tuatha Dé Danann.[2] Her husband is variously Nechtan, Elcmar or Nuada Airgetlám. With her lover the Dagda, she is the mother of Aengus. In order to hide their affair, the Dagda made the sun stand still for nine months; therefore, Aengus
Aengus
was conceived, gestated and born in one day.[3] As told in the Dindsenchas,[4] Boann
Boann
created the Boyne. Though forbidden to by her husband, Nechtan, Boann
Boann
approached the magical Well of Segais (also known as the Connla's Well), which was surrounded by hazels
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Bodb Derg
In Irish mythology, Bodb Derg (Old Irish: [ˈboðβ ˈdʲeɾɡ]) or Bodhbh Dearg ( Middle Irish and Modern Irish, [ˈboːβ ˈdʲaɾəɡ]) was a son of Eochaid Garb[1] or the Dagda,[2] and the Dagda's successor as King of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Aengus
Aengus
asks for his brother Bodb's help in finding the woman of his dreams in "Aislinge Óenguso" (the Dream of Aengus). At the time, Bodb is king of the síde of Munster. Bodb successfully identifies the woman as Caer Ibormeith.[3] Following the Tuatha Dé Danann's defeat in the battle of Tailtiu, Bodb is elected king of the Tuatha Dé Danann
Tuatha Dé Danann
in the "Children of Lir", just as the Tuatha Dé are going underground to dwell in the sídhe. He subsequently fathered many deities. Bodb's election is recognised by all of his rivals, save only Lir, who refuses him homage
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Bres
In Irish mythology, Bres (or Bress) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He is often referred to by the name Eochaid / Eochu Bres. His parents were Prince Elatha of the Fomorians
Fomorians
and Eri, daughter of Delbaith. He was an unpopular king, and favoured his Fomorian kin
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Brian (mythology)
In Gaelic mythology, Brian was one of the three Sons of Tuireann along with Iuchar and Iucharba. In Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann (The Tragedy of the Sons of Tuireann), the three set out to kill their father's enemy Cian. Cian is the father of Lugh, one of the greatest of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Cian shapeshifts into a pig to disguise himself, but the brothers shapeshift into dogs and hound him. They kill him, dismember his body and try to cover up their crime. In recompense, Lugh
Lugh
makes them quest all around the known world fetching magical weapons, which Lugh
Lugh
plans to use at the Second Battle of Magh Tuireadh
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Clíodhna
In Irish mythology, Clíodhna (Clídna, Clionadh, Clíodna, Clíona, transliterated to Kleena[dubious – discuss] in English) is a Queen of the Banshees of the Tuatha Dé Danann
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Cian
In Irish mythology, Cían (Irish pronunciation: [kʲiːən], "long, enduring, far, distant"),[1] also known as Scal Balb,[2][a] son of Dian Cecht of the Tuatha Dé Danann, is best known as the father of Lug
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