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M. L. West
Martin Litchfield West, OM, FBA (23 September 1937 – 13 July 2015) was a British classical scholar. He wrote on ancient Greek music, Greek tragedy, Greek lyric
Greek lyric
poetry, the relations between Greece and the ancient Near East, and the connection between shamanism and early ancient Greek religion, including the Orphic tradition
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Kenyon Medal For Classical Studies
The Kenyon Medal is awarded every two years by the British Academy 'in recognition of work in the field of classical studies and archaeology'. The medal was endowed by Sir Frederic Kenyon and was first awarded in 1957.[1] List of recipients[edit] Source: British Academy1957 – John Beazley 1959 – Michael Ventris (posthumously) 1961 – Edgar Lobel 1963 – Carl Blegen 1965 – Eduard Fraenkel 1967 – Maurice Bowra 1969 – Denys Page 1971 – E. R. Dodds 1973 – A. S. F. Gow 1975 – Ronald Syme 1977 – Rudolf Pfeiffer 1979 – Bernard Ashmole 1981 – Arnaldo Momigliano 1983 – Arthur Dale Trendall 1985 – D. R. Shackleton Bailey 1987 – Martin Robertson 1989 – F. W. Walbank 1991 – Homer Thompson 1993 – Kenneth Dover 1995 – John Boardman 1997 – Robin G. M. Nisbet 1999 – Brian B
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Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottingham
(/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ ( listen) NOT-ing-əm) is a city and unitary authority area in Nottinghamshire, England, 128 miles (206 km) north of London, in the East Midlands. Nottingham
Nottingham
has links to the legend of Robin Hood
Robin Hood
and to the lace-making, bicycle (notably Raleigh bikes), and tobacco industries. It was granted its city charter in 1897 as part of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Nottingham
Nottingham
is a tourist destination; in 2011, visitors spent over £1.5 billion—the thirteenth-highest amount in England's 111 statistical territories.[6] In 2015, Nottingham
Nottingham
had an estimated population of 321,550[7] with the wider urban area, which includes many of the city's suburbs, having a population of 915,977
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Eduard Fraenkel
David Mortier Eduard Fraenkel (17 March 1888 in Berlin
Berlin
– 5 February 1970 in Oxford) was a German-English philologist.Contents1 Background and early life 2 Oxford
Oxford
years and later life 3 Works 4 Selected writings 5 ReferencesBackground and early life[edit] Eduard Fraenkel was born to Jewish parents in Berlin. His father was a wine dealer, and his mother the daughter of an important publishing family. At the age of ten, Fraenkel suffered from an attack of osteomyelitis in his right arm that deformed his right hand. From 1897 to 1906 he attended the Askanisches Gymnasium in Berlin, where he was educated in Greek and Latin. At University, he began to study law, but soon turned his attention to Classics at Berlin
Berlin
University under the great philologist Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff
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Corpus Christi College, Oxford
Corpus Christi College (full name:The President and Scholars of the College of Corpus Christi in the University of Oxford), is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1517, it is the 12th oldest college in Oxford, with a financial endowment of £112.6 million as of 2015.[2] The college, situated on Merton Street
Merton Street
between Merton College and Christ Church, is one of the smallest in Oxford by student population, having around 250 undergraduates and 90 graduates
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St John's College, Oxford
St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford. Founded in 1555 by the merchant Sir Thomas White, intended to provide a source of educated Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
clerics to support the Counter-Reformation under Queen Mary
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Theogony
The Theogony
Theogony
(Greek: Θεογονία, Theogonía, Attic Greek: [tʰeoɡoníaː], i.e. "the genealogy or birth of the gods"[1]) is a poem by Hesiod
Hesiod
(8th – 7th century BC) describing the origins and genealogies of the Greek gods, composed c. 700 BC
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British Academy
The British Academy
British Academy
is the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. It receives an annual grant from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). In 2014/15 the British Academy's total income was £33,100,000, including £27,000,000 from BIS. £32,900,000 was distributed during the year in research grants, awards and charitable activities.[1] The British Academy
British Academy
was established in 1902 and received its Royal Charter in the same year. It is now a fellowship of more than 1,000 leading scholars spanning all disciplines across the humanities and social sciences and a funding body for research projects across the United Kingdom
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Royal Holloway, University Of London
Royal Holloway, University of London
University of London
(RHUL), formally incorporated as Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, is a public research university and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It has three faculties, 20 academic departments and c. 9,265 undergraduate and postgraduate students from over 100 countries.[4] The campus is located west of Egham, Surrey, 19 miles (31 km) from central London. The Egham
Egham
campus was founded in 1879 by the Victorian entrepreneur and philanthropist Thomas Holloway. Royal Holloway College was officially opened in 1886 by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
as an all-women college. It became a member of the University of London
University of London
in 1900
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All Souls College
All Souls College (official name: College of the souls of all the faithful departed [2]) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Unique to All Souls, all of its members automatically become Fellows (i.e. full members of the College's governing body)
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Armand D'Angour
Armand D'Angour (born 23 November 1958) is a British classical scholar and classical musician, Associate Professor of Classics at Oxford University and Fellow and Tutor in Classics at Jesus College, Oxford. His research embraces a wide range of areas across ancient Greek culture, and has resulted in publications that contribute to scholarship on ancient Greek music and metre, the Greek alphabet, innovation in ancient Greece, and Latin and Greek lyric
Greek lyric
poetry. He has written poetry in ancient Greek and Latin, and was commissioned to compose odes in ancient Greek for the 2004 and 2012 Olympic Games
Olympic Games
(the latter commissioned by Mayor of London
Mayor of London
Boris Johnson)
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Balzan Prize
The International Balzan Prize
Balzan Prize
Foundation awards four annual monetary prizes to people or organizations who have made outstanding achievements in the fields of humanities, natural sciences, culture, as well as for endeavours for peace and the brotherhood of man.Contents1 Rewards and assets 2 Categories 3 Recipients 4 External linksRewards and assets[edit] Each year the foundation chooses the fields eligible for the next year's prizes, and determines the prize amount. These are generally announced in May, with the winners announced the September the following year
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DPhil
A Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
(PhD, Ph.D., DPhil, or Dr. phil.; Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries. PhDs are awarded for programs across the whole breadth of academic fields. The completion of a PhD is often a requirement for employment as a university professor, researcher, or scientist in many fields. Individuals who have earned a Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
degree may, in most jurisdictions, use the title Doctor (often abbreviated "Dr") or, in non-English speaking countries, variants such as "Dr. phil." with their name, and may use post-nominal letters such as "Ph.D.", "PhD" (depending on the awarding institute). The requirements to earn a PhD degree vary considerably according to the country, institution, and time period, from entry-level research degrees to higher doctorates
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St Paul's School, London
St Paul's School is a selective independent school for boys aged 13–18, founded in 1509 by John Colet
John Colet
and located on a 43-acre (180,000m2) site by the River Thames, in Barnes, London. It is one of the original nine British "Clarendon" public schools as investigated by the 1861 Clarendon Commission. However, The School successfully argued that it should be omitted from the Public Schools Act 1868.[1] Since 1881, St Paul's has had its own preparatory school, St Paul's Juniors (formerly Colet Court), which since 1968 has been located on the same site
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DLitt
Doctor of Letters
Doctor of Letters
(D.Litt., Litt.D., D. Lit., or Lit. D.; Latin Litterarum Doctor or Doctor Litterarum) is an academic degree, a higher doctorate which, in some countries, may be considered to be beyond the Ph.D.
Ph.D.
and equal to the Doctor of Science (Sc.D. or D.Sc.). It is awarded in many countries by universities and learned bodies in recognition of achievement in the humanities, original contribution to the creative arts or scholarship and other merits. When awarded without an application by the conferee, it is awarded as an honorary degree.Contents1 Britain and the Commonwealth and The Republic of Ireland 2 United States 3 France 4 ReferencesBritain and the Commonwealth and The Republic of Ireland[edit]Bahram Beyzai, dressed in a St Andrews black cassock, having just received a D.Litt
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