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Lucius Cornelius Balbus (consul)
Lucius Cornelius Balbus (called Major—"the Elder"—to distinguish him from his nephew) was born in Gades early in the first century BC.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingLife[edit] Lucius Cornelius Balbus was a wealthy Roman politician and businessman from Gades who played a significant role in the emergence of the Principate
Principate
at Rome. He was a prominent supporter of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and an intimate advisor to the emperor Augustus. He served in Hispania
Hispania
under Pompey
Pompey
and Metellus Pius against Sertorius. For his services against Sertorius, Roman citizenship
Roman citizenship
was conferred upon him and his family by Pompey. He accompanied Pompey
Pompey
on his return to Rome
Rome
in 71 BC, and was for a long time one of his most intimate friends
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Lives Of The Twelve Caesars
The
The
/ðə/ ( listen) is a grammatical article in English, denoting person(s) or thing(s) already mentioned, under discussion, implied, or otherwise presumed familiar to listeners or readers. It is the only definite article in English. The
The
is the most commonly used word in the English language, accounting for 7 percent of all words.[1] It is derived from gendered articles in Old English
Old English
which merged in Middle English
Middle English
and now has a single form used with nouns of either gender. It can be used with both singular and plural nouns and with nouns that start with any letter
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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Google Books
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Exception That Proves The Rule
"The exception proves the rule" is a saying whose meaning has been interpreted or misinterpreted in various ways. Its true definition, or at least original meaning, is that the presence of an exception applying to a specific case establishes ("proves") that a general rule exists. For example, a sign that says "parking prohibited on Sundays" (the exception) "proves" that parking is allowed on the other six days of the week (the rule). A more explicit phrasing might be "the exception that proves the existence of the rule." An alternative explanation often encountered is that the word "prove" is used in the archaic sense of "test".[1] Thus, the saying does not mean that an exception demonstrates a rule to be true or to exist, but that it tests the rule
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Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake
is a work of avant-garde, fictional narrative with comic, romantic, and poetic elements, authored by Irish writer James Joyce. It is significant for its experimental style and reputation as one of the most difficult works of fiction in the English language.[1][2] Written in Paris over a period of seventeen years and published in 1939, two years before the author's death, Finnegans Wake was Joyce's final work. The entire book is written in a largely idiosyncratic language, which blends standard English lexical items and neologistic multilingual puns and portmanteau words to unique effect
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A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
is the first novel by Irish writer James Joyce. A Künstlerroman in a modernist style, it traces the religious and intellectual awakening of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictional alter ego of Joyce and an allusion to Daedalus, the consummate craftsman of Greek mythology. Stephen questions and rebels against the Catholic and Irish conventions under which he has grown, culminating in his self-exile from Ireland
Ireland
to Europe. The work uses techniques that Joyce developed more fully in Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake
(1939). A Portrait began life in 1904 as Stephen Hero—a projected 63-chapter autobiographical novel in a realistic style
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
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Commentarii De Bello Gallico
Commentāriī dē Bellō Gallicō (English: Commentaries on the Gallic War), also Bellum Gallicum (English: Gallic War), is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Roman Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome
Rome
elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
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Praetor
Praetor
Praetor
(Classical Latin: [ˈprajtoːr], also spelled prætor) was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army (in the field or, less often, before the army had been mustered); or, an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned various duties (which varied at different periods in Rome's history). The functions of the magistracy, the praetura (praetorship), are described by the adjective:[1] the praetoria potestas (praetorian power), the praetorium imperium (praetorian authority), and the praetorium ius (praetorian law), the legal precedents established by the praetores (praetors)
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Servius Sulpicius Rufus
Servius Sulpicius Rufus (c. 106 BC – 43 BC), was a Roman orator and jurist and the father of the poet Sulpicia, the only Roman female poet whose poetry survives. He studied rhetoric with Cicero, accompanying him to Rhodes
Rhodes
in 78 BC, though Sulpicius decided subsequently to pursue legal studies. In the later dialogue Brutus, Cicero
Cicero
praised the artistry of his legal learning as well as his eloquence.[1] In 63 BC, Sulpicius was a candidate for the consulship, but was defeated by Lucius Licinius Murena, whom he subsequently accused of bribery
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