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Low Frequency
Low frequency
Low frequency
(low freq) or LF is the ITU designation[1] for radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 30 kilohertz (kHz)–300 kHz. As its wavelengths range from ten kilometres to one kilometre, respectively, it is also known as the kilometre band or kilometre wave. LF radio waves exhibit low signal attenuation, making them suitable for long-distance communications. In Europe and areas of Northern Africa and Asia, part of the LF spectrum is used for AM broadcasting as the "longwave" band
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Low (band)
Low is an American indie rock[1] group from Duluth, Minnesota, formed in 1993. As of 2010, the group is composed of founding members Alan Sparhawk (guitar and vocals) and Mimi Parker
Mimi Parker
(drums and vocals), joined by Steve Garrington (bass guitar).[2] Previous bassists for the band include John Nichols from 1993 to 1994; Zak Sally
Zak Sally
from 1994 to 2005 and Matt Livingston from 2005 to 2008. The music of Low is characterized by slow tempos and minimalist arrangements. Early descriptions sometimes referred to it as a rock subgenre called "slowcore" often compared to the band Bedhead, who played this style during the 1980s and early 1990s
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Kilohertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Meter
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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North Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic
Atlantic
shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
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Attenuation
In physics, attenuation or, in some contexts, extinction is the gradual loss of flux intensity through a medium. For instance, dark glasses attenuate sunlight, lead attenuates X-rays, and water and air attenuate both light and sound at variable attenuation rates. Hearing protectors
Hearing protectors
help reduce acoustic flux from flowing into the ears. This phenomenon is called acoustic attenuation and is measured in decibels (dBs). In electrical engineering and telecommunications, attenuation affects the propagation of waves and signals in electrical circuits, in optical fibers, and in air
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International Telecommunications Union
The International Telecommunication
Telecommunication
Union (ITU; French: Union Internationale des Télécommunications (UIT)), originally the International Telegraph Union (French: Union Télégraphique Internationale), is a specialized agency of the United Nations
United Nations
(UN) that is responsible for issues that concern information and communication technologies.[1] The ITU coordinates the shared global use of the radio spectrum, promotes international cooperation in assigning satellite orbits, works to improve telecommunication infrastructure in the developing world, and assists in the development and coordination of worldwide technical standards
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Band VI
Band VI is a radio frequency range within the super high frequency (SHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2][3] One source states that Band VI ranges from 11.7 to 12.5 GHz,[1] whilst other earlier sources state the range as 11.7 to 12.7 GHz.[2][3] The band is used for direct-broadcast satellite (DBS)[1] and amateur radio astronomy.[4] References[edit]^ a b c "UK BROADCASTING BANDS" (PDF). TheSkywaves.NET. 2003-01-01. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ a b "Latest statistics on radio and television broadcasting" (PDF). UNESCO, Division of Statistics on Culture and Communication Office of Statistics. 1987. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ a b "SATELLITE BROADCASTING: A ZONED REFLECTOR AERIAL FOR THEDOMESTIC RECEPTION OF BAND VI" (PDF). BBC Research & Development. 1972. Retrieved 2009-05-20.  ^ "radioastronomy with a small 12 GHz satellitedish". Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers. 2008-09-03
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Band V
Band V (meaning Band 5) is the name of a radio frequency range within the ultra high frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2] It is not to be confused with the V band
V band
in the extremely high frequency part of the spectrum. Sources differ on the exact frequency range of UHF Band V. For example, the Broadcast engineer's reference book[1] and the BBC[2] define the range as 614 to 854 MHz. The IPTV India Forum define the range as 582 to 806 MHz[3] and the DVB Worldwide website refers to the range as 585 to 806 MHz.[4] Band V is primarily used for analogue and digital ( DVB-T
DVB-T
& ATSC) television broadcasting, as well as radio microphones and services intended for mobile devices such as DVB-H
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Band IV
Band IV is the name of a radio frequency range within the ultra high frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[1][2][3][4][5] Sources differ on the exact frequency range of the band. For example, the Swiss Federal Office of Communications,[1] the Broadcast engineer's reference book[2] and Ericsson
Ericsson
India Ltd[3] all define the range of Band IV from 470 to 582 MHz
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Band II
Band II is the range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 87.5 to 108.0 megahertz (MHz).Contents1 Radio 2 Broadcast television2.1 Usage in Russia and in other former members of OIRT3 ReferencesRadio[edit] Band II is primarily used worldwide for FM radio broadcasting.[1] Broadcast television[edit] Usage in Russia and in other former members of OIRT[edit] In the former Soviet Union and other countries-members of OIRT, frequencies from 76 MHz to 100 MHz were designated for broadcast television usage.[2] Considering 8 MHz channel bandwidth used by the Russian analog television system (System D), the following
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Band III
Band III is the name of the range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum from 174 to 240 megahertz (MHz). It is primarily used for radio and television broadcasting
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Band I
Band I is a range of radio frequencies within the very high frequency (VHF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Band I ranges from 47 to 68 MHz
MHz
for the European Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Area,[1] and from 54 to 88 MHz for the Americas[2] and it is primarily used for television broadcasting in line to ITU Radio Regulations (article 1.38)
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W Band
The W band
W band
of the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum ranges from 75 to 110 GHz, wavelength ≈2.7–4 mm. It sits above the U.S. IEEE-designated V band
V band
(40–75 GHz) in frequency, and overlaps the NATO designated M band
M band
(60–100 GHz). The W band is used for satellite communications, millimeter-wave radar research, military radar targeting and tracking applications, and some non-military applications.Contents1 Radar 2 Heat ray 3 Communications 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksRadar[edit] A number of passive millimeter-wave cameras for concealed weapons detection operate at 94 GHz. A frequency around 77  GHz is used for automotive cruise control radar
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J Band (NATO)
The NATO J band is the obsolete designation given to the radio frequencies from 10 to 20 GHz (equivalent to wavelengths between 3 and 1.5 cm) during the cold war period. Since 1992 frequency allocations, allotment and assignments are in line to NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA).[1] However, in order to identify military radio spectrum requirements, e.g
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Terahertz Radiation
Terahertz radiation
Terahertz radiation
– also known as submillimeter radiation, terahertz waves, tremendously high frequency[1] (THF), T-rays, T-waves, T-light, T-lux or THz – consists of electromagnetic waves within the ITU-designated band of frequencies from 0.3 to 3 terahertz (THz; 1 THz = 1012 Hz). Wavelengths of radiation in the terahertz band correspondingly range from 1 mm to 0.1 mm (or 100 μm). Because terahertz radiation begins at a wavelength of one millimeter and proceeds into shorter wavelengths, it is sometimes known as the submillimeter band, and its radiation as submillimeter waves, especially in astronomy. Photon energy in the THz regime is less than the band-gap energy of non-metallic materials and thus THz radiation can penetrate such materials
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