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Lousios
The Lousios
Lousios
(Greek: Λούσιος) is a river and a gorge in western Arcadia
Arcadia
that stretches from Karytaina
Karytaina
north to Dimitsana
Dimitsana
in Greece. The river begins near Lykochori and flows through the Lousios
Lousios
Gorge. The river is treacherous and flows rapidly. It empties into the Alfeios
Alfeios
2.5 km northwest of Karytaina
Karytaina
and south of Atsicholos. The river forms a deep, narrow gorge. Its length is approximately 15 km from north to south and its width is approximately 2 km wide. The gorge is very popular amongst hikers. At the northern end of the gorge lies the town of Dimitsana. At the southern end is the ancient city of Gortys with the temple of Asclepius
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Peloponnese
The Peloponnese
Peloponnese
(/ˈpɛləpəˌniːz/) or Peloponnesus (/ˌpɛləpəˈniːsəs/; Greek: Πελοπόννησος, Pelopónnēsos) is a peninsula and geographic region in southern Greece. It is separated from the central part of the country by the Isthmus and Gulf of Corinth
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Tobacco
Tobacco
Tobacco
is a product prepared from the leaves of the tobacco plant by curing them. The plant is part of the genus Nicotiana
Nicotiana
and of the Solanaceae
Solanaceae
(nightshade) family. While more than 70 species of tobacco are known, the chief commercial crop is N. tabacum. The more potent variant N. rustica is also used around the world. Tobacco
Tobacco
contains the alkaloid nicotine, which is a stimulant, and harmala alkaloids.[2] Dried tobacco leaves are mainly used for smoking in cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, and flavored shisha tobacco. They can also be consumed as snuff, chewing tobacco, dipping tobacco and snus. Tobacco
Tobacco
use is a risk factor for many diseases, especially those affecting the heart, liver, and lungs, as well as many cancers
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Mount Athos
Mount Athos
Mount Athos
(/ˈæθɒs/; Greek: Άθως, Áthos, [ˈaθos]) is a mountain and peninsula in northeastern Greece
Greece
and an important centre of Eastern Orthodox monasticism. It is governed as an autonomous polity within the Greek Republic. Mount Athos
Mount Athos
is home to 20 monasteries under the direct jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. Mount Athos
Mount Athos
is commonly referred to in Greek as the "Holy Mountain" (Ἅγιον Ὄρος) and the entity as the "Athonite State" (Αθωνική Πολιτεία, Athoniki Politia). Other languages of Orthodox tradition also use names translating to "Holy Mountain" (e.g. Bulgarian and Serbian Света гора, Russian Святая гора, Georgian მთაწმინდა)
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Olympian Gods
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Hermes, and either Hestia
Hestia
or Dionysus.[2] They were called 'Olympians' because they were considered to reside on Mount Olympus. Although Hades
Hades
was a major ancient Greek god, and was the brother of the first generation of Olympians (Zeus, Poseidon, Hera, Demeter, and Hestia), he resided in the underworld, far from Olympus, and thus was not usually considered to be one of the Olympians. Besides the twelve Olympians, there were many other cultic groupings of twelve gods.Contents1 Olympians 2 Twelve gods 3 List 4 Genealogy 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesOlympians[edit] The Olympians were the principal deities of the Greek pantheon, so named because of their residency atop Mount Olympus
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Zeus
Zeus
Zeus
(/zjuːs/;[3] Greek: Ζεύς Zeús [zdeǔ̯s])[4] is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter. His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to those of Indo-European deities such as Indra, Jupiter, Perkūnas, Perun, Thor, and Odin.[5][6][7] Zeus
Zeus
is the child of Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach. In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.[8] At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad
Iliad
states that he fathered Aphrodite.[11] Zeus was also infamous for his erotic escapades
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Asclepius
Asclepius
Asclepius
(/æsˈkliːpiəs/; Greek: Ἀσκληπιός, Asklēpiós [asklɛːpiós]; Latin: Aesculapius) was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius
Asclepius
represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia
Hygieia
("Hygiene", the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso (the goddess of the healing process), Aglæa/Ægle (the goddess of the glow of good health), and Panacea
Panacea
(the goddess of universal remedy). He was associated with the Roman/Etruscan god Vediovis
Vediovis
and the Egyptian Imhotep.[1] He was one of Apollo's sons, sharing with Apollo
Apollo
the epithet Paean ("the Healer").[2] The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today
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Dimitsana
Dimitsana
Dimitsana
(Greek: Δημητσάνα) is a mountain village and a former municipality in Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Gortynia, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 110.759 km2.[3] Dimitsana
Dimitsana
is built on the ruins of the ancient town Teuthis. The population of the village is 342 (2011 census), while it was 611 in 2001. It has been registered as a traditional settlement. Dimitsana
Dimitsana
is built on a mountain slope at an elevation of 950 meters. From its southern side a marvelous view of Megalopolis plain and Taygetus
Taygetus
is provided. Dimitsana
Dimitsana
is located 53 km east of Pyrgos, 31 km northwest of Tripoli, 23 km northwest of Megalopoli and 17 km northeast of Andritsaina
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Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
(Greek: Αρκαδία, Arkadía) is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the administrative region of Peloponnese. It is situated in the central and eastern part of the Peloponnese peninsula. It takes its name from the mythological figure Arcas. In Greek mythology, it was the home of the god Pan
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Gorge
A canyon (Spanish: cañón; archaic British English
British English
spelling: cañon)[1] or gorge is a deep cleft between escarpments or cliffs resulting from weathering and the erosive activity of a river over geologic timescales.[2] Rivers have a natural tendency to cut through underlying surfaces, eventually wearing away rock layers as sediments are removed downstream. A river bed will gradually reach a baseline elevation, which is the same elevation as the body of water into which the river drains. The processes of weathering and erosion will form canyons when the river's headwaters and estuary are at significantly different elevations,[3] particularly through regions where softer rock layers are intermingled with harder layers more resistant to weathering. A canyon may also refer to a rift between two mountain peaks, such as those in ranges including the Rocky Mountains, the Alps, the Himalayas or the Andes
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River
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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