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Louisiana State University
The Louisiana
Louisiana
State University
University
(officially Louisiana
Louisiana
State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, commonly referred to as LSU) is a public coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[7] The university was founded in 1853 in what is now known as Pineville, Louisiana, under the name Louisiana
Louisiana
State Seminary of Learning & Military Academy. The current LSU main campus was dedicated in 1926, consists of more than 250 buildings constructed in the style of Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
architect Andrea Palladio, and occupies a 650-acre (2.6 km²) plateau on the banks of the Mississippi River. LSU is the flagship institution of the Louisiana
Louisiana
State University System and the most comprehensive university in Louisiana
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Central Louisiana
Central Louisiana
Louisiana
(Cenla), also known as the Crossroads region, is the part of Louisiana
Louisiana
that includes the following parishes: Allen, Avoyelles, Beauregard, Catahoula, Concordia, Grant, La Salle, Natchitoches, Rapides, Sabine, and Vernon. The largest communities in the region as of the 2010 Census were Alexandria (47,893), Natchitoches (18,323) and Pineville (14,555). Central Louisiana
Louisiana
is a land of physical and cultural diversity. Extensive prairies, piney hill region known as the Louisiana
Louisiana
Central Hill Country, minor swamplands and deciduous forests make up its geography
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Coeducation
Mixed-sex education, also known as mixed-gender education, co-education or coeducation (abbreviated to co-ed or coed), is a system of education where males and females are educated together. Whereas single-sex education was more common up to the 19th century, mixed-sex education has since become standard in many cultures, particularly in Western countries. Single-sex education, however, remains prevalent in many Muslim
Muslim
countries. The relative merits of both systems have been the subject of debate. The world's oldest co-educational day and boarding school is Dollar Academy, a junior and senior school for males and females from ages 5 to 18 in Scotland, United Kingdom. From its opening in 1818 the school admitted both boys and girls of the parish of Dollar and the surrounding area. The school continues in existence to the present day with around 1,250 pupils.[1] The first co-educational college to be founded was Oberlin Collegiate Institute in Oberlin, Ohio
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University
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Andrea Palladio
Andrea Palladio
Andrea Palladio
(Italian pronunciation: [anˈdrɛːa palˈlaːdjo]; 30 November 1508 – 19 August 1580) was an Italian[1] architect active in the Republic of Venice. Palladio, influenced by Roman and Greek architecture, primarily by Vitruvius, is widely considered to be one of the most influential individuals in the history of architecture
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Football Bowl Subdivision
The NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
Football Bowl Subdivision
Football Bowl Subdivision
(FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, is the top level of college football in the United States. The FBS is the most competitive subdivision of NCAA
NCAA
Division I, which itself consists of the largest and most competitive schools in the National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA)
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NCAA
The National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA)[a] is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States
United States
and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. In its 2016-17 fiscal year the NCAA took in $1.06 billion dollars in revenue, over 82% of which was generated by the Division I Men's Basketball
Basketball
Tournament
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Flagship Campus
A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet of vessels, typically the first, largest, fastest, most heavily armed, or best known. Over the years, the term "flagship" has become a metaphor used in industries such as broadcasting, automobiles, airlines, and retailing to refer to their highest profile or most expensive products and locations.Contents1 Naval use 2 Flagship
Flagship
as metaphor2.1 Colleges and universities in the United States 2.2 Retailing 2.3 Broadcasting 2.4 Automobiles 2.5 Conservation3 ReferencesNaval use[edit] In common naval use, the term flagship is fundamentally a temporary designation; the flagship is wherever the admiral's flag is being flown
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Urban Area
An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
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Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States
United States
and Canada, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland, or a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at most Australian universities. Additionally, the heads of certain colleges in the UK and Ireland are called provosts; it is, in this sense, the equivalent of a master (or various other titles for the head of the college) at other colleges.Contents1 Duties, role, titles, and selection 2 Other titles and uses 3 History 4 See also 5 Referen
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