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Louise Brown
Louise Joy Brown (born 25 July 1978) is an English woman known for being the first human to have been born after conception by in vitro fertilisation, or IVF.Contents1 Biography 2 Ethical and religious issues 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Louise Joy Brown was born at Oldham
Oldham
General Hospital, Oldham, by planned Caesarean section
Caesarean section
delivered by registrar John Webster.[1] She weighed 5 pounds, 12 ounces (2.608 kg) at birth.[2] Her parents, Lesley and John Brown, had been trying to conceive for nine years. Lesley faced complications of blocked fallopian tubes.[2] On 10 November 1977, Lesley Brown underwent a procedure, later to become known as in vitro fertilisation (IVF), developed by Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards
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Nobel Prize
The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
(/ˈnoʊbɛl/, Swedish pronunciation: [nʊˈbɛl]; Swedish definite form, singular: Nobelpriset; Norwegian: Nobelprisen) is a set of annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances. The will of the Swedish scientist Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
established the prizes in 1895
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Oldham General Hospital
A hospital is a health care institution providing patient treatment with specialized medical and nursing staff and medical equipment.[1] The best-known type of hospital is the general hospital, which typically has an emergency department to treat urgent health problems ranging from fire and accident victims to a heart attack. A district hospital typically is the major health care facility in its region, with large numbers of beds for intensive care and additional beds for patients who need long-term care. Specialised hospitals include trauma centres, rehabilitation hospitals, children's hospitals, seniors' (geriatric) hospitals, and hospitals for dealing with specific medical needs such as psychiatric treatment (see psychiatric hospital) and certain disease categories. Specialised hospitals can help reduce health care costs compared to general hospitals.[2] A teaching hospital combines assistance to people with teaching to medical students and nurses
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
(AFP) is an international news agency headquartered in Paris, France. Founded in 1835,[2][3] AFP is the third largest news agency in the world, after the Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) and Reuters. Journalists of the French Resistance
French Resistance
established the AFP in the headquarters of the former Office français d'information, a Vichy news agency, following the liberation of Paris. Currently, the CEO is Emmanuel Hoog (fr) and the News Director is Michèle Léridon.[4] AFP has regional offices in Nicosia, Montevideo, Hong Kong, and Washington, D.C., and bureaux in 150 countries
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Pope Paul VI
Pope
Pope
Paul VI
Paul VI
(Latin: Paulus VI; Italian: Paolo VI), born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini[a] (Italian pronunciation: [dʒioˈvanːi baˈtːista enˈriko anˈtonjo marˈija monˈtini]; 26 September 1897 – 6 August 1978), reigned from 21 June 1963 to his death in 1978. Succeeding John XXIII, he continued the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
which he closed in 1965, implementing its numerous reforms, and fostered improved ecumenical relations with Eastern Orthodox and Protestants, which resulted in many historic meetings and agreements.[7] Montini served in the Holy See's Secretariat of State from 1922 to 1954
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Informed Consent
Informed consent
Informed consent
is a process for getting permission before conducting a healthcare intervention on a person, or for disclosing personal information. A health care provider may ask a patient to consent to receive therapy before providing it, or a clinical researcher may ask a research participant before enrolling that person into a clinical trial. Informed consent
Informed consent
is collected according to guidelines from the fields of medical ethics and research ethics. An informed consent can be said to have been given based upon a clear appreciation and understanding of the facts, implications, and consequences of an action. Adequate informed consent is rooted in respecting a person’s dignity.[1] To give informed consent, the individual concerned must have adequate reasoning faculties and be in possession of all relevant facts
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Gallbladder
In vertebrates, the gallbladder is a small hollow organ where bile is stored and concentrated before it is released into the small intestine. In humans, the pear-shaped gallbladder lies beneath the liver, although the structure and position of the gallbladder can vary significantly among animal species. It receives and stores bile, produced by the liver, via the common hepatic duct, and releases it via the common bile duct into the duodenum, where the bile helps in the digestion of fats. The gallbladder can be affected by gallstones, formed by material that cannot be dissolved – usually cholesterol or bilirubin, a product of haemoglobin breakdown. These may cause significant pain, particularly in the upper-right corner of the abdomen, and are often treated with removal of the gallbladder called a cholecystectomy
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Bristol Royal Infirmary
The Bristol Royal Infirmary, also known as the BRI, is a large teaching hospital situated in the centre of Bristol, England. It has links with the nearby University of Bristol and the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of the West of England, also in Bristol. The BRI is one of eight hospitals within the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust. It is located next to the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the Bristol Heart Institute (BHI).[1]Contents1 History 2 Archives 3 Redevelopment 4 Bristol heart scandal 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Plan of the first infirmary, 1742The BRI is one of the oldest infirmaries in the United Kingdom.[2] A wealthy city merchant, Paul Fisher, was prominent in the foundation of the hospital in 1735
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Petri Dish
A Petri dish
Petri dish
(sometimes spelled "Petrie Dish" and alternatively known as a Petri plate or cell-culture dish), named after the German bacteriologist Julius Richard Petri,[1][2] is a shallow cylindrical glass or plastic lidded dish that biologists use to culture cells[3] – such as bacteria – or small mosses.[4] Modern Petri dishes usually feature rings and/or slots on their lids and bases so that when stacked, they are less prone to sliding off one another. Multiple dishes can also be incorporated into one plastic container to create a "multi-well plate"
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Human Fertilisation
Human fertilization is the union of a human egg and sperm, usually occurring in the ampulla of the fallopian tube. The result of this union is the production of a zygote cell, or fertilized egg, initiating prenatal development. Scientists discovered the dynamics of human fertilization in the nineteenth century.[1] The process of fertilization involves a sperm fusing with an ovum. The most common sequence begins with ejaculation during copulation, follows with ovulation, and finishes with fertilization. Various exceptions to this sequence are possible, including artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, external ejaculation without copulation, or copulation shortly after ovulation.[2][3][4] Upon encountering the secondary oocyte, the acrosome of the sperm produces enzymes which allow it to burrow through the outer jelly coat of the egg
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Fallopian Tube Obstruction
Fallopian tube
Fallopian tube
obstruction is a major cause of female infertility. Blocked fallopian tubes are unable to let the ovum and the sperm converge, thus making fertilization impossible. Fallopian Tubes are also known as oviducts, uterine tubes, and salpinges (singular salpinx).Contents1 Types 2 Causes 3 Evaluation 4 Treatment4.1 Tuboplasty 4.2 In vitro
In vitro
fertilization 4.3 Alternative medicine5 ReferencesTypes[edit] Approximately 20% of female infertility can be attributed to tubal causes.[1] Distal tubal occlusion (affecting the end towards the ovary) is typically associated with hydrosalpinx formation and often caused by Chlamydia trachomatis.[1] Pelvic adhesions may be associated with such an infection
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Specialty Registrar
A specialty registrar (StR) is a doctor, public health practitioner or dentist who is working as part of a specialty training programme in the UK
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