HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Louisa May Alcott
Louisa May Alcott
Louisa May Alcott
(/ˈɔːlkət, -kɒt/; November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the novel Little Women
Little Women
(1868) and its sequels Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys
Jo's Boys
(1886).[1] Raised by her transcendentalist parents, Abigail May
Abigail May
and Amos Bronson Alcott
Amos Bronson Alcott
in New England, she also grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Alcott's family suffered financial difficulties, and while she worked to help support the family from an early age, she also sought an outlet in writing. She began to receive critical success for her writing in the 1860s
[...More...]

"Louisa May Alcott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Women's Rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
are the rights and entitlements claimed for women and girls worldwide, and formed the basis for the women's rights movement in the nineteenth century and feminist movement during the 20th century. In some countries, these rights are institutionalized or supported by law, local custom, and behavior, whereas in others they are ignored and suppressed
[...More...]

"Women's Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seamstress
A dressmaker is a person who makes custom clothing for women, such as dresses, blouses, and evening gowns. Also called a mantua-maker (historically) or a modiste.Contents1 Notable dressmakers 2 Related terms 3 See also 4 ReferencesNotable dressmakers[edit]Cristóbal Balenciaga Pierre Balmain Coco Chanel Christian Dior David Emanuel Jean Muir, fashion designer (though she herself preferred to be called a dressmaker[1]) Isabel Toledo Madeleine Vionnet Charles Frederick WorthRelated terms[edit]Jean-Baptiste Jules Trayer, Breton seamstresses in a shop 1854). Prior to the Industrial Revolution, a seamstress did handsewing. Dressmaker
Dressmaker
denotes clothing made in the style of a dressmaker, frequently in the term dressmaker details which includes ruffles, frills, ribbon or braid trim
[...More...]

"Seamstress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Feminism
Feminism
Feminism
is a range of political movements, ideologies, and social movements that share a common goal: to define, establish, and achieve political, economic, personal, and social equality of sexes.[1][2] This includes seeking to establish educational and professional opportunities for women that are equal to those for men. Feminist movements have campaigned and continue to campaign for women's rights, including the right to vote, to hold public office, to work, to earn fair wages or equal pay, to own property, to receive education, to enter contracts, to have equal rights within marriage, and to have maternity leave
[...More...]

"Feminism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
[...More...]

"Pennsylvania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Transcendental Club
The Transcendental Club was a group of New England
New England
intellectuals of the early-to-mid-19th century which gave rise to Transcendentalism.Contents1 Overview 2 Notes 3 Further reading 4 External linksOverview[edit] Frederic Henry Hedge, Ralph Waldo Emerson, George Ripley, and George Putnam (1807–1878; the Unitarian minister in Roxbury) met in
[...More...]

"Transcendental Club" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sudbury River
The Sudbury River
Sudbury River
is a 32.7-mile-long (52.6 km) tributary of the Concord River
Concord River
in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the United States.[1] Originating in the Cedar Swamp in Westborough, Massachusetts, near the boundary with Hopkinton, the Sudbury River
Sudbury River
meanders generally northeast, through Fairhaven Bay, and to its confluence with the Assabet River
Assabet River
at Egg Rock
Egg Rock
in Concord, Massachusetts, to form the Concord River
[...More...]

"Sudbury River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Utopia
A utopia (/juːˈtoʊpiə/ yoo-TOH-pee-ə) is an imagined community or society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.[1][2] The opposite of a utopia is a dystopia
[...More...]

"Utopia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naturalist
Natural history
Natural history
is the research and study of organisms including animals, fungi and plants in their environment, leaning more towards observational than experimental methods of study. A person who studies natural history is known as a naturalist or natural historian. Natural history encompasses scientific research but is not limited to it, with articles nowadays more often published in science magazines than in academic journals.[1] Grouped among the natural sciences, natural history is the systematic study of any category of natural objects or organisms.[2] That is a very broad designation in a world filled with many narrowly focused disciplines
[...More...]

"Naturalist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Governess
A governess is a woman employed to teach and train children in a private household. In contrast to a nanny (formerly called a nurse), she concentrates on teaching children instead of meeting their physical needs. Her charges are of school age rather than babies.[1] The position of governess used to be common in well-off European families before the First World War, especially in the countryside where no suitable school existed nearby. Parents' preference to educate their children at home—rather than send them away to boarding school for months at a time—varied across time and countries. Governesses were usually in charge of girls and younger boys
[...More...]

"Governess" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy
Divine Comedy
and was one of the five Fireside Poets
Fireside Poets
from New England. Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, which was then still part of Massachusetts. He studied at Bowdoin College
Bowdoin College
and, after spending time in Europe, he became a professor at Bowdoin and later at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, and he lived the remainder of his life in a former Revolutionary War headquarters of George Washington in Cambridge, Massachusetts
[...More...]

"Henry Wadsworth Longfellow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Irish Immigrants
The Irish diaspora
Irish diaspora
(Irish: Diaspóra na nGael) refers to Irish people and their descendants who live outside Ireland. The phenomenon of migration from Ireland
Ireland
is recorded since early Medieval times,[1] but it is only possible to quantify it from around 1700: since then between 9 and 10 million people born in Ireland
Ireland
have emigrated. This is more than the population of Ireland
Ireland
at its historical peak in the 1840s of 8.5 million. The poorest of them went to Great Britain, especially Liverpool; those who could afford it went further, including almost 5 million to the United States.[2] After 1840, emigration from Ireland
Ireland
became a massive, relentless, and efficiently managed national enterprise.[3] In 1890 40% of Irish-born people were living abroad
[...More...]

"Irish Immigrants" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Safe House
A safe house is, in a generic sense, a secret place for sanctuary or suitable to hide persons from the law, hostile actors or actions, or from retribution, threats or perceived danger.[1] It may also be a metaphor.Contents1 Historical usage 2 See also 3 References 4 SourcesHistorical usage[edit] It may also refer to:in the jargon of law enforcement and intelligence agencies, a secure location, suitable for hiding witnesses, agents or other persons perceived as being in danger a place where people may go to avoid prosecution of their activities by authorities
[...More...]

"Safe House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to
[...More...]

"Underground Railroad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fugitive Slave
The phenomenon of slaves running away and seeking to gain freedom is as old as the institution of slavery itself. In the history of slavery in the United States, "fugitive slaves" (also known as runaway slaves) were slaves who left their master and traveled without authorization; generally they tried to reach states or territories where slavery was banned, including Canada, or, until 1821, Spanish Florida. Most slave law tried to control slave travel by requiring them to carry official passes if traveling without a master. Passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850
Fugitive Slave Act of 1850
increased penalties against fugitive slaves and people who aided them. Because of this, fugitive slaves tried to leave the United States
United States
altogether, traveling to Canada
Canada
or Mexico
[...More...]

"Fugitive Slave" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass
(born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey; c. February 1818[4] – February 20, 1895[5]) was an African-American
African-American
social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory[6] and incisive antislavery writings. In his time, he was described by abolitionists as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens.[7][8] Northerners at the time found it hard to believe that such a great orator had once been a slave.[9] Douglass wrote several autobiographies
[...More...]

"Frederick Douglass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.