HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Louis St. Laurent
Louis Stephen St. Laurent PC CC QC (Saint-Laurent or St-Laurent in French, baptized Louis-Étienne St-Laurent; 1 February 1882 – 25 July 1973) was the 12th Prime Minister of Canada, from 15 November 1948 to 21 June 1957. He was a Liberal with a strong base in the Catholic francophone community, from which base he had long mobilised support to Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. His foreign policy initiatives transformed Canada from an isolationist ex-colony with little role in world affairs to an active "middle power". St. Laurent was an enthusiastic proponent of Canada's joining NATO
NATO
in 1949 to fight Communist totalitarianism, overcoming opposition from some intellectuals, the Labor-Progressive Party, and many French Canadians.[1] The contrast with Mackenzie King was not dramatic – they agreed on most policies. St. Laurent had more hatred of communism, and less fear of the United States
[...More...]

picture info

Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
[...More...]

picture info

Conscription Crisis Of 1917
ImperialistsPrime Minister's Office Conservative Party Liberal–Unionists Ministry of MilitiaNationalistsHis Majesty's Opposition Laurier Liberals Pacifists
Pacifists
and anti-war protestersLead figuresSir Robert Borden Sir Albert Edward KempSir Wilfrid Laurier Henri BourassaThe Conscription
Conscription
Crisis of 1917 (French: Crise de la conscription de 1917) was a political and military crisis in Canada
Canada
during World War I. It was mainly caused by disagreement on whether men should be conscripted to fight in the war
[...More...]

picture info

Queen's Privy Council For Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
[...More...]

picture info

French-Canadian
French Canadians
Canadians
(also referred to as Franco- Canadians
Canadians
or Canadiens; French: Canadien(ne)s français(es)) are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada
Canada
from the 17th century onward. Today, French Canadians
Canadians
constitute the main French-speaking population in Canada, accounting for about 22% of the total population.[2] During the mid-18th century, Canadian colonists born in French Canada expanded across North America
North America
and colonized various regions, cities, and towns;[3] the French Canadian settlers originated primarily from districts in the west of France, such as Normandy, Perche, Beauce, Maine, Anjou, Touraine, Poitou, Aunis, Angoumois, Saintonge
Saintonge
and Gascony.[4] Today, French Canadians
Canadians
live across North America
[...More...]

picture info

Rhodes Scholarship
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
[...More...]

picture info

Labor-Progressive Party
The Labor-Progressive Party
Labor-Progressive Party
(French: Parti ouvrier-progressiste) was a legal political organization in Canada
Canada
between 1943 and 1959.Contents1 Origins and initial success 2 Provincial campaigns 3 Munic
[...More...]

picture info

NATO
The North Atlantic Treaty
North Atlantic Treaty
Organization ( NATO
NATO
/ˈneɪtoʊ/; French: Organisation du traité de l'Atlantique nord; OTAN), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. The organization implements the North Atlantic Treaty
North Atlantic Treaty
that was signed on 4 April 1949.[3][4] NATO
NATO
constitutes a system of collective defence whereby its independent member states agree to mutual defence in response to an attack by any external party. NATO's Headquarters are located in Haren, Brussels, Belgium, while the headquarters of Allied Command Operations
Allied Command Operations
is near Mons, Belgium. Since its founding, the admission of new member states has increased the alliance from the original 12 countries to 29
[...More...]

picture info

Francophone
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
[...More...]

picture info

World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
[...More...]

Quebec
Quebec (/k(w)ɪˈbɛk/ ( listen);[8] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen))[9] is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario and the bodies of water James Bay and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut is larger
[...More...]

Quebec Lieutenant
In Canadian politics, a Quebec
Quebec
lieutenant is a politician, from Quebec, usually a francophone and most often a Member of Parliament or at least a current or former candidate for Parliament, who is selected by a senior politician such as the Prime Minister or the leader of a national federal party, as his or her main advisor and/or spokesperson on issues specific to Quebec. This is particularly the case when the leader is an anglophone, though several francophone leaders have also had Quebec
Quebec
lieutenants; all francophone leaders of the Liberal Party have had Quebec
Quebec
lieutenants. This is usually a well-known but often an unofficial assignment
[...More...]

picture info

Conscription
Military
Military
service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eConscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.[5] Conscription
Conscription
dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names. The modern system of near-universal national conscription for young men dates to the French Revolution in the 1790s, where it became the basis of a very large and powerful military
[...More...]

picture info

Canadian Bar Association
The Canadian Bar Association
Canadian Bar Association
represents over 37,000 lawyers, judges, notaries, law teachers, and law students from across Canada.Contents1 History 2 Objectives 3 Organisation 4 Arms 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Association's first Annual Meeting was held in Montreal
Montreal
in 1896. However, the CBA has been in continuous existence in its present form since 1914
[...More...]

picture info

Heart Failure
Heart
Heart
failure (HF), often referred to as congestive heart failure (CHF), is when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs.[9][10][11] Signs and symptoms commonly include shortness of breath, excessive tiredness, and leg swelling.[2] The shortness of breath is usually worse with exercise, while lying down, and may wake the person at night.[2] A limited ability to exercise is also a common feature.[12] Chest pain, including angina, does not typically occur due to heart failure.[13] Common causes of heart failure include coronary artery disease including a previous myoca
[...More...]

Brogue
The term brogue (/broʊɡ/ BROWG) generally refers to an Irish accent. Less commonly, it may also refer to certain other regional forms of English, in particular those of Scotland or the English West Country.[1][2] The word was first recorded in 1689.[3] Multiple etymologies have been proposed: it may derive from the Irish bróg ("shoe"), the type of shoe traditionally worn by the people of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands, and hence possibly originally meant "the speech of those who call a shoe a 'brogue'".[4] It is also possible that the term comes from the Irish word barróg, meaning "a hold (on the tongue)", thus "accent" or "speech impediment".[5] A famous false etymology states that the word stems from the supposed perception that the Irish spoke English so peculiarly that it was as if they did so "with a shoe in their mouths".[6] See also[edit]Language contact List of English words of Irish origin Regional accents of EnglishReferences[edit]^ brogue, noun
[...More...]

.