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Lou Mei
Lou mei
Lou mei
(滷味) is the Cantonese
Cantonese
name given to dishes made by braising in a sauce known as a master stock or lou sauce (滷水; lóuh séui or 滷汁; lóuh jāp). Lou mei
Lou mei
can be made from meat, offals, and other off cuts. The most common varieties are beef, pork, duck and chicken. Lou mei
Lou mei
originates in Southern China, is a core part of Teochew cuisine, and is widely available in China
China
and Taiwan with many regional varieties. Selections vary greatly among overseas Chinatowns often depending on the immigrant mix. Lou mei
Lou mei
can be served cold or hot. Cold lou mei is often served with a side of hot braising liquid for immediate mixing
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Hors D'oeuvre
Part of a series onMealsMealsBreakfast Second breakfast Elevenses Brunch Lunch Tea Tea Supper Dinner Combination meal Kids' meal Snack Value mealComponents and coursesFull course dinner Amuse-bouche Hors d'oeuvre Soup Entrée Roast Main course Salad Side dish Entremet Dessert Meal
Meal
preparationRelated conceptsÀ la carte Banquet Boodle fight Buffet CuisinelistDrink Eating Food History of breakfast Snacking Table d'hôte Table mannersv t eThis article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols.An hors d'oeuvre (/ɔːr ˈdɜːrv, -ˈdɜːrvrə/; French: hors d'œuvre, [also hors d'oevre] [ɔʁ dœvʁ] ( listen)), appetizer[1] or starter[2] is a small dish served before a meal.[3] Some hors d'oeuvres are served cold, others hot.[4] Hors d'oeuvres may be served at the dinner table as a part of the meal, or they may be served before seating
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Duck
see text Duck
Duck
is the common name for a large number of species in the waterfowl family Anatidae, which also includes swans and geese. Ducks are divided among several subfamilies in the family Anatidae; they do not represent a monophyletic group (the group of all descendants of a single common ancestral species) but a form taxon, since swans and geese are not considered ducks
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Pork Knuckles And Ginger Stew
Pork Knuckles and Ginger Stew
Pork Knuckles and Ginger Stew
(Chinese: 豬腳薑; pinyin: zhū jiǎo jiāng; Jyutping: zyu1 goek3 goeng1) is a dish in traditional Cantonese cuisine. It is traditionally eaten by new mothers in Guangzhou
Guangzhou
to restore strength and health, and is presented to friends and family to indicate the arrival of a new baby.Contents1 Legend 2 Tradition 3 Nutrition 4 Preparation 5 Commercialisation 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLegend[edit]Pork Knuckles and Ginger StewAccording to legend in the early Ming Dynasty[1] there lived a butcher who had the good fortune to marry a very pretty, kind and gumptious girl. However, their happiness was broken by the fact that even after several years of marriage, the wife was still without child
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Lemon Chicken
Lemon
Lemon
chicken is Krause’s fave
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Dragon Tiger Phoenix
A dragon is a large, serpent-like legendary creature that appears in the folklore of many cultures around world. Beliefs about dragons vary drastically by region, but dragons in western cultures since the High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
have often been depicted as winged, horned, four-legged, and capable of breathing fire. Dragons
Dragons
in eastern cultures are usually depicted as wingless, four-legged, serpentine creatures with above-average intelligence. The earliest attested dragons resemble giant snakes. Dragon-like creatures are first described in the mythologies of the ancient Near East and appear in ancient Mesopotamian art and literature. Stories about storm-gods slaying giant serpents occur throughout nearly all Indo-European and Near Eastern mythologies
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Suckling Pig
A suckling pig or sucking pig is a piglet fed on its mother's milk (i.e., a piglet which is still a "suckling"). In culinary contexts, a suckling pig is slaughtered between the ages of two and six weeks. It is traditionally cooked whole, often roasted, in various cuisines. It is usually prepared for special occasions and gatherings. The meat from suckling pig is pale and tender and the cooked skin is crisp and can be used for pork rinds. The texture of the meat can be somewhat gelatinous due to the amount of collagen in a young pig.Contents1 History 2 Regional dishes2.1 Spanish-speaking countries 2.2 Asia 2.3 European 2.4 United States3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] There are many ancient recipes for suckling pig from Roman and Chinese cuisine. Since the pig is one of the first animals domesticated by human beings for slaughter, many references to pigs are found in human culture
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Congee
Congee
Congee
or conjee (/ˈkɒndʒi/) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries, especially East Asia. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added while preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own, especially for the ill. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation
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Sweet And Sour Pork
Sweet and sour
Sweet and sour
is a generic term that encompasses many styles of sauce, cuisine and cooking methods
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Bao Yu
57, see species section.Synonyms[4]Euhaliotis Wenz, 1938 Eurotis Habe & Kosuge, 1964 Exohaliotis Cotton & Godfrey, 1933 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Haliotis) Linnaeus, 1758 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Nordotis) Habe & Kosuge, 1964 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Notohaliotis) Cotton & Godfrey, 1933 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Padollus) Montfort, 1810 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Paua) C. Fleming, 1953 Haliotis
Haliotis
(Sulculus) H. Adams & A. Adams, 1854 Marinauris Iredale, 1927 Neohaliotis Cotton & Godfrey, 1933 Nordotis Habe & Kosuge, 1964 Notohaliotis Cotton & Godfrey, 1933 Ovinotis Cotton, 1943 Padollus Montfort, 1810 Paua
Paua
C. Fleming, 1953 Sanhaliotis Iredale, 1929 Schismotis Gray, 1856 Teinotis H. Adams & A. Adams, 1854 Tinotis P
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Kelp
Akkesiphycaceae Alariaceae Chordaceae Costariaceae Laminariaceae Lessoniaceae PseudochordaceaeKelps are large brown algae seaweeds that make up the order Laminariales. There are about 30 different genera.[citation needed] Kelp
Kelp
grows in "underwater forests" (kelp forests) in shallow oceans, and is thought to have appeared in the Miocene, 23 to 5 million years ago.[3] The organisms require nutrient-rich water with temperatures between 6 and 14 °C (43 and 57 °F). They are known for their high growth rate—the genera Macrocystis
Macrocystis
and Nereocystis
Nereocystis
can grow as fast as half a metre a day, ultimately reaching 30 to 80 metres (100 to 260 ft).[4] Through the 19th century, the word "kelp" was closely associated with seaweeds that could be burned to obtain soda ash (primarily sodium carbonate)
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Teochew Cuisine
Teochew cuisine, also known as Chiuchow cuisine, Chaozhou
Chaozhou
cuisine or Chaoshan
Chaoshan
cuisine, originated from the Chaoshan
Chaoshan
region in the eastern part of China's Guangdong
Guangdong
Province, which includes the cities of Chaozhou, Shantou
Shantou
and Jieyang. Teochew cuisine
Teochew cuisine
bears more similarities to that of Fujian cuisine, with which it shares some dishes
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Chicken
The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a type of domesticated fowl, a subspecies of the red junglefowl. It is one of the most common and widespread domestic animals, with a total population of more than 19 billion as of 2011. There are more chickens than any other bird or domesticated fowl.[1] Humans keep chickens primarily as a source of food (consuming both their meat and eggs) and, more rarely, as pets. Genetic studies have pointed to multiple maternal origins in Southeast Asia, East Asia,[2] and South Asia, but with the clade found in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa originating in the Indian subcontinent
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Chinatown
A Chinatown
Chinatown
(Chinese: 唐人街; pinyin: Tángrénjiē; Jyutping: tong4 yan4 gaai1) is an ethnic enclave of Chinese or Han people located outside mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan, most often in an urban setting. Areas known as "Chinatown" exist throughout the world, including Asia, Australia, the Americas, Africa and Europe. The development of most Chinatowns typically resulted from mass migration to an area without any, or with very few Chinese residents. Binondo
Binondo
in Manila, established in 1594, is recognised as the world's oldest Chinatown
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Pork
Pork
Pork
is the culinary name for meat from a domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide,[1] with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC. Pork
Pork
is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie
Charcuterie
is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork. Pork
Pork
is the most popular meat in Eastern and Southeastern Asia, and is also very common in the Western world, especially in Central Europe. It is highly prized in Asian cuisines for its fat content and pleasant texture
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