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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Wiki
A wiki (/ˈwɪki/ ( listen) WIK-ee) is a website on which users collaboratively modify content and structure directly from the web browser. In a typical wiki, text is written using a simplified markup language and often edited with the help of a rich-text editor.[1] A wiki is run using wiki software, otherwise known as a wiki engine. A wiki engine is a type of content management system, but it differs from most other such systems, including blog software, in that the content is created without any defined owner or leader, and wikis have little implicit structure, allowing structure to emerge according to the needs of the users.[2] There are dozens of different wiki engines in use, both standalone and part of other software, such as bug tracking systems. Some wiki engines are open source, whereas others are proprietary. Some permit control over different functions (levels of access); for example, editing rights may permit changing, adding or removing material
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David Halberstam
David Halberstam
David Halberstam
(April 10, 1934 – April 23, 2007) was an American journalist and historian, known for his work on the Vietnam War, politics, history, the Civil Rights Movement, business, media, American culture, and later, sports journalism.[1] He won a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1964. Halberstam was killed in a car crash in 2007, while doing research for a book.[2][3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Vietnam 2.2 Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and Poland 2.3 Foreign policy, media works 2.4 Sports writing 2.5 Later years3 Death 4 Mentor to other authors 5 Criticism 6 Awards and honors 7 Books 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Halberstam was born in New York City
New York City
and raised in Winsted, Connecticut, where he was a classmate of Ralph Nader
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Boosterism
Boosterism is the act of promoting ("boosting") a town, city, or organization, with the goal of improving public perception of it. Boosting can be as simple as talking up the entity at a party or as elaborate as establishing a visitors' bureau. It has been somewhat associated with American small towns. Boosting is also done in political settings, especially in regard to disputed policies or controversial events.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] During the expansion of the American and Canadian West, boosterism became epidemic as the leaders and owners of small towns made extravagant predictions for their settlement, in the hope of attracting more residents and, not coincidentally, inflating the prices of local real estate. The 1871 humorous speech The Untold Delights of Duluth, delivered by Democratic U.S. Representative J
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Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
      Civic Center/Grand ParkOwner Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Music CenterType Performing arts centerSeating type ReservedCapacity 3,156ConstructionBuilt 1962-1964Opened September 27, 1964Tenants Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Opera Glorya Kaufman
Glorya Kaufman
Presents Dance at The Music CenterWebsiteOfficial websiteThe Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
is one of the halls in the Los Angeles Music Center (which is one of the three largest performing arts centers in the United States)
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Northeastern United States
The Northeastern United States, also referred to as the American Northeast or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States
United States
bordered to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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American Federation Of Labor
The American Federation of Labor
American Federation of Labor
(AFL) was a national federation of labor unions in the United States founded in Columbus, Ohio, in December 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers
Samuel Gompers
of the Cigar Makers' International Union
Cigar Makers' International Union
was elected president at its founding convention and reelected every year, except one, until his death in 1924. The AFL was the largest union grouping in the United States for the first half of the 20th century, even after the creation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations
Congress of Industrial Organizations
(CIO) by unions which were expelled by the AFL in 1935 over its opposition to industrial unionism
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
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Los Angeles Music Center
      Civic Center (Regional Connector) (future)The Music Center (officially named the Performing Arts Center of Los Angeles County) is one of the largest performing arts centers in the United States.[1] Located in downtown Los Angeles, The Music Center is home to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Ahmanson Theater, Mark Taper Forum, Roy and Edna Disney / CalArts Theatre, and Walt Disney Concert Hall
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CW Television Network
The CW
The CW
Television Network (commonly referred to as just The CW) is an American English-language broadcast television network that is operated by The CW
The CW
Network, LLC, a limited liability joint venture[2] between CBS
CBS
Corporation, the former owners of United Paramount Network (UPN), and Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Entertainment, a division of Time Warner, former majority owner of The WB. The network's name is an abbreviation derived from the first letters of the names of its two parent corporations ( CBS
CBS
and Warner Bros.). The CW
The CW
made its debut on September 18, 2006, after its two predecessors, UPN
UPN
and The WB, respectively ceased independent operations on September 15 and 17 of that year
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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