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Lord Voldemort
Lord Voldemort
Voldemort
(/ˈvoʊldəmɔːr/;[1][2] /-mɔːrt/ in the films; born Tom Marvolo Riddle) is a fictional character and the main antagonist in J. K. Rowling's series of Harry Potter
Harry Potter
novels. Voldemort first appeared in Harry Potter
Harry Potter
and the Philosopher's Stone, which was released in 1997. Voldemort
Voldemort
appears either in person or in flashbacks in each book and its film adaptation in the series, except the third, Harry Potter
Harry Potter
and the Prisoner of Azkaban, where he is only mentioned. Voldemort
Voldemort
is the archenemy of Harry Potter, who according to a prophecy has "the power to vanquish the Dark Lord". Nearly every witch or wizard dares not utter his unmentionable name, and refers to him instead with such expressions as "You-Know-Who", "He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named" or "the Dark Lord"
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Novels
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally in prose, which is typically published as a book. The genre has been described as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years,"[1] with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word for a short story to distinguish it from a novel, has been used in English since the 18th century for a work that falls somewhere in between. Ian Watt, in The Rise of the Novel, suggested in 1957 that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century. Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
author of Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.[2] The romance is a closely related long prose narrative
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Stephen Fry
Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957)[1] is an English comedian, actor, writer, presenter, and activist. He is well known as half of the comic double act Fry and Laurie, with collaborator Hugh Laurie, with whom he co-starred in A Bit of Fry & Laurie and Jeeves
Jeeves
and Wooster. Fry's acting roles include a Golden Globe Award–nominated lead performance in the film Wilde, Melchett in the BBC
BBC
television series Blackadder, the title character in the television series Kingdom, a recurring guest role as Dr Gordon Wyatt on the crime series Bones, and as Gordon Deitrich in the dystopian thriller V for Vendetta. He has also written and presented several documentary series, including the Emmy Award–winning Stephen Fry: The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive, which saw him explore his bipolar disorder, and the travel series Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
in America
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Antagonist
An antagonist is a character, group of characters, institution or concept that stands in or represents opposition against which the protagonist(s) must contend. In other words, an antagonist is a person or a group of people who opposes a protagonist.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Types2.1 Heroes and villains 2.2 Other characters 2.3 Aspects of the protagonist 2.4 Non-personal3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English word antagonist comes from the Greek ἀνταγωνιστής – antagonistēs, "opponent, competitor, villain, enemy, rival," which is derived from anti- ("against") and agonizesthai ("to contend for a prize").[2][3]. Types[edit] Heroes and villains[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Archenemy
An archenemy (sometimes spelled arch-enemy) is the main enemy of someone.[1][2][3] In fiction, it is a character who is the hero's or protagonist's most prominent and worst enemy. Etymology[edit] The word archenemy or arch-enemy originated around the mid-16th century, from the words arch- (from Greek "arkhos" meaning "most important")[3] and enemy.[1] An archenemy may also be referred to as archfoe, archvillain, or archnemesis.[citation needed] See also[edit]Antagonist Rogues gallery VillainSupervillainReferences[edit]^ a b "archenemy definition". Dictionary.com. Archived from the original on 5 October 2008. Retrieved 7 September 2008.  ^ "archenemy – Definition from the Merriam-Webster
Merriam-Webster
Online Dictionary". Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 26 June 2008.  ^ a b Wicaksono, Rachel. "BBC World Service Learning English Ask about English". BBC
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Voice Acting
Voice acting
Voice acting
is the art of performing voice-overs or providing voices to represent a character or to provide information to an audience or user. Examples include animated, off-stage, off-screen or non-visible characters in various works, including feature films, dubbed foreign language films, animated short films, television programs, commercials, radio or audio dramas, comedy, video games, puppet shows, amusement rides, audiobooks and documentaries. Voice acting
Voice acting
is also done for small handheld audio games. Performers are called voice actors or actresses, voice artists or voice talent. Their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice
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Prophecy
A prophecy is a message that is claimed by a prophet to have been communicated to them by a god. Such messages typically involve inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of divine will concerning the prophet's social world and events to come (compare divine knowledge). All known ancient cultures had prophets who delivered prophecies.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definitions 3 Bahá'í Faith 4 Buddhism 5 China 6 Christianity6.1 Later Christianity 6.2 Latter Day
Day
Saint movement7 Islam 8 Judaism 9 Native American prophecy 10 Nostradamus 11 Skepticism 12 Psychology 13 See also 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External linksEtymology[edit] The English noun "prophecy", in the sense of "function of a prophet" appeared from about 1225, from Old French
Old French
profecie (12th century), and from prophetia, Greek propheteia "gift of interpreting the will of God", from Greek prophetes (see prophet)
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Jim Dale
Dale or dales may refer to:Contents1 Locations 2 Geography 3 People 4 Other 5 See alsoLocations[edit] Dale (landform), an open valley, particularly in Scotland and northern England Dale (place name element)Geography[edit]AustraliaThe Dales (Christmas Island), in the Indian OceanCanadaDale, OntarioEthiopia
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Dwarves (band)
The Dwarves are an American punk rock band formed in Chicago, Illinois, as The Suburban Nightmare, in the mid-1980s. They are currently based in San Francisco, California.[1] Formed as a garage punk band, their career subsequently saw them move in a hardcore direction before settling into an eclectic punk rock sound emphasizing intentionally shocking lyrics
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Audiobook
An audiobook (or talking book) is a recording of a text being read. A reading of the complete text is noted as "unabridged", while readings of a reduced version, or abridgement of the text are labeled as "abridged". Spoken audio has been available in schools and public libraries and to a lesser extent in music shops since the 1930s. Many spoken word albums were made prior to the age of videocassettes, DVDs, compact discs, and downloadable audio, however often of poetry and plays rather than books
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Backstory
A backstory, background story, back-story, or background is a set of events invented for a plot, presented as preceding and leading up to that plot. It is a literary device of a narrative history all chronologically earlier than the narrative of primary interest. It is the history of characters and other elements that underlie the situation existing at the main narrative's start. Even a purely historical work selectively reveals backstory to the audience.[1][2]Contents1 Usage 2 Recollection 3 Shared universe 4 See also 5 ReferencesUsage[edit] As a literary device backstory is often employed to lend depth or believability to the main story. The usefulness of having a dramatic revelation was recognized by Aristotle, in Poetics. Backstories are usually revealed, partially or in full, chronologically or otherwise, as the main narrative unfolds
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Lightning
Lightning
Lightning
is a sudden electrostatic discharge that occurs typically during a thunderstorm. This discharge occurs between electrically charged regions of a cloud (called intra-cloud lightning or IC), between two clouds (CC lightning), or between a cloud and the ground (CG lightning). The charged regions in the atmosphere temporarily equalize themselves through this discharge referred to as a flash. A lightning flash can also be a strike if it involves an object on the ground
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BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
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Psychopath
Psychopathy, sometimes considered synonymous with sociopathy, is traditionally defined as a personality disorder[1] characterized by persistent antisocial behavior, impaired empathy, impaired remorse, bold, disinhibited, and egotistical traits. Different conceptions of psychopathy have been used throughout history. These conceptions are only partly overlapping and may sometimes be contradictory.[2] Hervey M. Cleckley, an American psychiatrist, influenced the initial diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality reaction/disturbance in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), as did American psychologist George E. Partridge.[3] The DSM and International Classification of Diseases (ICD) subsequently introduced the diagnoses of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and dissocial personality disorder (DPD) respectively, stating that these diagnoses have been referred to (or include what is referred to) as psychopathy or sociopathy
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Philip Nel
Philip Nel (born 1969) is an American scholar of children's literature and University Distinguished Professor of English at Kansas State University. He is best known for his work on Dr. Seuss
Dr. Seuss
and Harry Potter, which have led to his being a guest on such media programs as CBS Sunday Morning, NPR's Morning Edition
Morning Edition
and Talk
Talk
of the Nation.Contents1 Background 2 Career 3 Works 4 SourcesBackground[edit] Nel was born in Massachusetts. He received his B.A. from the University of Rochester
University of Rochester
in 1992, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University
Vanderbilt University
in 1993 and 1997, respectively. He married Karin Westman on May 24, 1997
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