HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lopingian
The Permian
Permian
is a geologic period and system which spans 46.7 million years from the end of the Carboniferous
Carboniferous
Period 298.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Triassic
Triassic
period 251.902 Mya. It is the last period of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
era; the following Triassic
Triassic
period belongs to the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
era. The concept of the Permian
Permian
was introduced in 1841 by geologist Sir Roderick Murchison, who named it after the city of Perm. The Permian
Permian
witnessed the diversification of the early amniotes into the ancestral groups of the mammals, turtles, lepidosaurs, and archosaurs. The world at the time was dominated by two continents known as Pangaea
Pangaea
and Siberia, surrounded by a global ocean called Panthalassa
[...More...]

"Lopingian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Permic Languages
The Permic languages
Permic languages
are a branch of the Uralic language family. They are spoken in several regions to the west of the Ural Mountains
Ural Mountains
within the Russian Federation. The total number of speakers is around 950,000, of which around 550,000 speak the most widely spoken language, Udmurt. Like other Uralic languages, the Permic languages are primarily agglutinative and have a rich system of grammatical cases
[...More...]

"Permic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lepidosauria
The Lepidosauria
Lepidosauria
(from Greek meaning scaled lizards) are reptiles with overlapping scales. This subclass includes Squamata
Squamata
and Rhynchocephalia. It is a monophyletic group and therefore contains all descendents of a common ancestor.[2] Squamata
Squamata
includes snakes, lizards, and amphisbaenia.[3] Rhynchocephalia
Rhynchocephalia
was a widespread and diverse group 220-100 million years ago;[4] however, it is now represented only by the genus Sphenodon, which contains two species of tuatara, native to New Zealand.[5][6] Lepidosauria
Lepidosauria
is the sister taxon to Archosauria, which includes Aves
Aves
and Crocodilia
[...More...]

"Lepidosauria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mya (unit)
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
[...More...]

"Mya (unit)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roderick Murchison
Roderick Impey Murchison, 1st Baronet
Baronet
KCB DCL FRS FRSE
FRSE
FLS PRGS PBA MRIA (22 February 1792[2] – 22 October 1871) was a British geologist who first described and investigated the Silurian
Silurian
system.Contents1 Early life and work 2 Silurian
Silurian
system 3 Scotland 4 Later life 5 Legacy5.1 Memorials6 Bibliography 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life and work[edit] Murchison was born at Tarradale House, Muir of Ord, Ross-shire, the son of Kenneth Murchison. His wealthy father died in 1796, when Roderick was four years old, and he was sent to Durham School
Durham School
three years later,[3] and then the Royal Military College, Great Marlow
Royal Military College, Great Marlow
to be trained for the army. In 1808 he landed with Wellesley in Galicia, and was present at the actions of Roliça and Vimeiro
[...More...]

"Roderick Murchison" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Perm
Perm
Perm
(Russian: Пермь, IPA: [pʲɛrmʲ];[13]) is a city and the administrative center of Perm
Perm
Krai, Russia, located on the banks of the
[...More...]

"Perm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amniote
Amniotes (from Greek ἀμνίον amnion, "membrane surrounding the fetus", earlier "bowl in which the blood of sacrificed animals was caught", from ἀμνός amnos, "lamb"[1]) are a clade of tetrapod vertebrates comprising the reptiles, birds, and mammals. Amniotes lay their eggs on land or retain the fertilized egg within the mother, and are distinguished from the anamniotes (fishes and amphibians), which typically lay their eggs in water. Older sources, particularly prior to the 20th century, may refer to amniotes as "higher vertebrates" and anamniotes as "lower vertebrates", based on the discredited idea of the great chain of being. Amniotes are tetrapods (descendants of four-limbed and backboned animals) that are characterised by having an egg equipped with an amnion, an adaptation to lay eggs on land rather than in water as the anamniotes (including frogs) typically do
[...More...]

"Amniote" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mammal
Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/ from Latin mamma "breast"), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands. Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young
[...More...]

"Mammal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turtle
Cryptodira Pleurodira †Meiolaniidae and see textDiversity14 extant families with 356 speciesblue: sea turtles, black: land turtlesThis article's lead section may not adequately summarize its contents. To comply with's lead section guidelines, please consider modifying the lead to provide an accessible overview of the article's key points in such a way that it can stand on its own as a concise version of the article. (discuss). (January 2018)Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines
Testudines
(or Chelonii[3]) characterized by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield.[4] "Turtle" may refer to the order as a whole (American English) or to fresh-water and sea-dwelling testudines (British English).[5] The order Testudines
Testudines
includes both extant (living) and extinct species
[...More...]

"Turtle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archosaur
Arctopoda Haeckel, 1895 Avesuchia Benton, 1999Archosaurs are a group of diapsid amniotes whose living representatives consist of birds and crocodilians. This group also includes all extinct non-avian dinosaurs, extinct crocodilian relatives, and pterosaurs. Archosauria, the archosaur clade, is a crown group that includes the most recent common ancestor of living birds and crocodilians
[...More...]

"Archosaur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Permian High School
Permian
Permian
High School is a public high school located in Odessa, Texas and is one of three high schools in the Ector County Independent School District. It was the subject of the book Friday Night Lights which in turn inspired a movie and TV series of the same name.Contents1 History 2 Athletics2.1 Football2.1.1 Coaching history3 Activities3.1 Satin Strings 3.2 Orchestra4 Alumni 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Opened in 1959, Permian
Permian
High is named for the Permian
Permian
Basin, the geological formation which underlies Midland and Odessa. The name stems from the age of the rocks in the basin where the school is located, which are from the geological period that preceded the largest mass extinction in the history of life. The Permian
Permian
Basin is the source of the large oil and natural gas deposits that drive the region's economy
[...More...]

"Permian High School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pangaea
Pangaea
Pangaea
or Pangea ( /pænˈdʒiːə/[1]) was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic
Paleozoic
and early Mesozoic
Mesozoic
eras.[2][3] It assembled from earlier continental units approximately 335 million years ago, and it began to break apart about 175 million years ago.[4] In contrast to the present Earth
Earth
and its distribution of continental mass, much of Pangaea
Pangaea
was in the southern hemisphere and surrounded by a superocean, Panthalassa
[...More...]

"Pangaea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Siberia (continent)
Siberia, also known as Angaraland (or simply Angara) and Angarida,[1] is an ancient craton located in the heart of Siberia. Today forming the Central Siberian Plateau, it formed an independent continent before the Permian
Permian
period. Angaraland was named in the 1880s by Austrian geologist Eduard Suess who erroneously believed that in the Paleozoic there were two large continents in the Northern Hemisphere: "Atlantis", North America connected to Europe
Europe
by a peninsula (=Greenland and Iceland); and "Angara-land", eastern Asia, named after the Angara River
Angara River
in Siberia.[2]Contents1 Precambrian history 2 Paleozoic history 3 Mesozoic and Cenozoic history 4 References 5 External linksPrecambrian history[edit] About 2.5 billion years ago (Siderian), Siberia
Siberia
was part of a continent of Arctica, along with the Canadian Shield
[...More...]

"Siberia (continent)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse
The Carboniferous
Carboniferous
rainforest collapse (CRC) was a minor extinction event that occurred around 305 million years ago in the Carboniferous period.[1] It altered the vast coal forests that covered the equatorial region of Euramerica
Euramerica
(Europe and America). This event may have fragmented the forests into isolated 'islands', which in turn caused dwarfism and, shortly after, extinction of many plant and animal species
[...More...]

"Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Desert
A desert is a barren area of landscape where little precipitation occurs and consequently living conditions are hostile for plant and animal life. The lack of vegetation exposes the unprotected surface of the ground to the processes of denudation. About one third of the land surface of the world is arid or semi-arid. This includes much of the polar regions where little precipitation occurs and which are sometimes called polar deserts or "cold deserts". Deserts can be classified by the amount of precipitation that falls, by the temperature that prevails, by the causes of desertification or by their geographical location. Deserts are formed by weathering processes as large variations in temperature between day and night put strains on the rocks which consequently break in pieces. Although rain seldom occurs in deserts, there are occasional downpours that can result in flash floods
[...More...]

"Desert" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geology
Geology
Geology
(from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
γῆ, gē, i.e. "earth" and -λoγία, -logia, i.e. "study of, discourse"[1][2]) is an earth science concerned with the solid Earth, the rocks of which it is composed, and the processes by which they change over time. Geology can also refer to the study of the solid features of any terrestrial planet or natural satellite, (such as Mars
Mars
or the Moon). Geology
Geology
describes the structure of the Earth
Earth
beneath its surface, and the processes that have shaped that structure
[...More...]

"Geology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.