HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lonnie Mack
Lonnie McIntosh (July 18, 1941 – April 21, 2016), known by his stage name Lonnie Mack, was an American rock, blues, and country singer-guitarist
[...More...]

"Lonnie Mack" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rising Sun, Indiana
Rising Sun is a city in Randolph Township, Ohio County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. The population was 2,304 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Ohio County.[6]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Casino 4 Demographics4.1 2010 census 4.2 2000 census5 Education 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The town was registered in 1816 by John James, originally of Frederick County, Maryland.[7] At the time, it had a population of about 700. Many German immigrants settled in Rising Sun.[8] The Rising Sun post office has been in operation since 1844.[9] In the 1830s, Rising Sun was a seasonal stop for hundreds of flatboats daily heading down the Ohio River.[10] The Clore Plow Works-J.W
[...More...]

"Rising Sun, Indiana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Traditional Black Gospel
Traditional black gospel is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding African American Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. It is a form of Christian music
Christian music
and a subgenre of gospel music. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace. However, a common theme as with most Christian music
Christian music
is praise, worship or thanks to God and Christ.[1] Traditional gospel music was popular in the mid-20th century
[...More...]

"Traditional Black Gospel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rockabilly Hall Of Fame
Rockabilly
Rockabilly
is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, dating back to the early 1950s in the United States, especially the South. As a genre it blends the sound of Western musical styles such as country with that of rhythm and blues,[1][2] leading to what is considered "classic" rock and roll.[3] Some have also described it as a blend of bluegrass with rock and roll.[4] The term "rockabilly" itself is a portmanteau of "rock" (from "rock 'n' roll") and "hillbilly", the latter a reference to the country music (often called "hillbilly music" in the 1940s and 1950s) that contributed strongly to the style
[...More...]

"Rockabilly Hall Of Fame" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Owsley County
Owsley County is a county located in the Eastern Coalfield region of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,755,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Kentucky
[...More...]

"Owsley County" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky
(/kənˈtʌki/ ( listen) kən-TUK-ee), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,[5] Kentucky
Kentucky
is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky
Kentucky
became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky
Kentucky
is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States. Kentucky
Kentucky
is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil
[...More...]

"Kentucky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sharecroppers
Sharecropping
Sharecropping
is a form of agriculture in which a landowner allows a tenant to use the land in return for a share of the crops produced on their portion of land. Sharecropping
Sharecropping
has a long history and there are a wide range of different situations and types of agreements that have used a form of the system. Some are governed by tradition, and others by law. Legal contract systems such as the Italian mezzadria, the French métayage, the Spanish mediero, or the Islamic system of muqasat, occur widely.[citation needed]Contents1 Overview1.1 Advantages 1.2 Disadvantages2 Regions2.1 Africa 2.2 United States3 Sharecropping
Sharecropping
agreements 4 Farmers' cooperatives 5 Economic theories of share tenancy 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingOverview[edit] Sharecropping
Sharecropping
has benefits and costs for both the owners and the tenant
[...More...]

"Sharecroppers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
/ɪndiˈænə/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
located in the midwestern and Great Lakes
Great Lakes
regions of North America. Indiana
Indiana
is the 38th largest by area and the 17th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis. Indiana
Indiana
was admitted to the United States
United States
as the 19th U.S. state
U.S. state
on December 11, 1816
[...More...]

"Indiana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
[...More...]

"Ohio River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grand Ole Opry
The Grand Ole Opry
Grand Ole Opry
is a weekly country-music stage concert in Nashville, Tennessee, which was founded on November 28, 1925, by George D. Hay as a one-hour radio "barn dance" on WSM
[...More...]

"Grand Ole Opry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhythm And Blues
Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated as R&B, is a genre of popular music that originated in the 1940s.[1] The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.[2] In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, one or more saxophones, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy,[3] as well as triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term "rhythm and blues" has undergone a number of shifts in meaning
[...More...]

"Rhythm And Blues" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lone Ranger
The Lone Ranger
Lone Ranger
is a fictional masked former Texas Ranger who fought outlaws in the American Old West
American Old West
with his Native American friend, Tonto. The character has been called an enduring icon of American culture.[7] He first appeared in 1933 in a radio show conceived either by WXYZ (Detroit) radio station owner George W. Trendle,[3][4][5] or by Fran Striker,[8] the show's writer.[9][10] The radio series proved to be a hit and spawned a series of books (largely written by Striker), an equally popular television show that ran from 1949 to 1957, comic books, and several movies. The title character was played on the radio show by George Seaton, Earle Graser, and Brace Beemer.[8] Clayton Moore portrayed the Lone Ranger
Lone Ranger
on television, although during a contract dispute, Moore was replaced temporarily by John Hart, who wore a different style of mask
[...More...]

"Lone Ranger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Epic Records
Epic Records
Epic Records
is an American major record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment; a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, Inc.
Sony Corporation of America, Inc.
Epic was founded predominantly as a jazz and classical music label in 1953. It later expanded its scope to include a more diverse range of musical genres, including pop, R&B, rock and hip hop. The label has released albums by popular artists including Tammy Wynette, George Michael, Lamb of God, Cheap Trick, Meat Loaf, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Ted Nugent, Shakira, Sly & the Family Stone, Celine Dion, ABBA, Anastacia, Boston, Dave Clark Five, Gloria Estefan, Pearl Jam, Rage Against the Machine and Michael Jackson.[1] Along with Columbia and RCA Records, Epic is one of Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment's three main record labels
[...More...]

"Epic Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Country Gospel
Christian
Christian
country music (sometimes marketed as country gospel, gospel country, positive country or inspirational country) is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian
Christian
life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian
Christian
alternative to mainstream secular music. Christian country music is a form of Christian music
Christian music
and a subgenre of both Gospel music
Gospel music
and Country music. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of Christian
Christian
country music varies according to culture and social context. It is composed and performed for many purposes, ranging from aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes with a positive message, or as an entertainment product for the marketplace
[...More...]

"Country Gospel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Merle Travis
Merle Robert Travis (November 17, 1917 – October 20, 1983) was an American country and western singer, songwriter, and guitarist born in Rosewood, Kentucky. His songs' lyrics often discussed both the lives and the economic exploitation of American coal miners. Among his many well-known songs are "Sixteen Tons," "Re-Enlistment Blues," "I am a Pilgrim,"[1] and "Dark as a Dungeon." However, it is his unique guitar style, still called Travis Picking by guitarists, as well as his interpretations of the rich musical traditions of his native Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, for which he is best known today. "Travis Picking" is a syncopated style of guitar fingerpicking rooted in ragtime music in which alternating chords and bass notes are plucked by the thumb while melodies are simultaneously plucked by the index finger
[...More...]

"Merle Travis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Les Paul
Lester William Polsfuss (June 9, 1915 – August 12, 2009), known as Les Paul, was an American jazz, country, and blues guitarist, songwriter, luthier, and inventor. He was one of the pioneers of the solid-body electric guitar. Paul taught himself how to play guitar, and while he is mainly known for jazz and popular music, he had an early career in country music.[1] He is credited with many recording innovations
[...More...]

"Les Paul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.