HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Long-tailed Weasel
The long-tailed weasel ( Mustela
Mustela
frenata), also known as the bridled weasel or big stoat, is a species of mustelid distributed from southern Canada
Canada
throughout all the United States
United States
and Mexico, southward through all of Central America
Central America
and into northern South America
[...More...]

"Long-tailed Weasel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
[...More...]

"Conservation Status" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rat
64 speciesSynonymsStenomys Thomas, 1910Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents of the superfamily Muroidea. "True rats" are members of the genus Rattus, the most important of which to humans are the black rat, Rattus rattus, and the brown rat, Rattus norvegicus. Many members of other rodent genera and families are also referred to as rats, and share many characteristics with true rats. Rats are typically distinguished from mice by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a large muroid rodent, its common name includes the term rat, while if it is smaller, the name includes the term mouse. The muroid family is broad and complex, and the common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific
[...More...]

"Rat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Skunk
Skunks are North and South American mammals in the family Mephitidae. Not related to polecats which are in the weasel family, the closest Old World relative to the skunk is the stink badger[1]. The animals are known for their ability to spray a liquid with a strong unpleasant smell.[2][3][4] Different species of skunk vary in appearance from black-and-white to brown, cream or ginger colored, but all have warning coloration.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical description 3 Diet 4 Behavior 5 Reproduction 6 Anal scent glands 7 Bites 8 As pets 9 Classification 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymology[edit] 1630s, squunck, from a southern New England Algonquian language (probably Abenaki) seganku, from Proto-Algonquian */šeka:kwa/, from */šek-/ "to urinate" + */-a:kw/ "fox." "Skunk" has historic use as an insult, attested from 1841
[...More...]

"Skunk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hummingbird
Phaethornithinae Trochilinae For a taxonomic list of genera, see:List of hummingbird generaFor an alphabetic species list, see:List of hummingbirdsHummingbirds are birds from the Americas that constitute the family Trochilidae. They are among the smallest of birds, most species measuring 7.5–13 cm (3–5 in) in length. Indeed, the smallest extant bird species is a hummingbird, the 5 cm (2.0 in) bee hummingbird weighing less than 2.0 g (0.07 oz). They are known as hummingbirds because of the humming sound created by their beating wings which flap at high frequencies audible to humans. They hover in mid-air at rapid wing-flapping rates, which vary from around 12 beats per second in the largest species, to in excess of 80 in some of the smallest
[...More...]

"Hummingbird" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ageing
Ageing
Ageing
or aging (see spelling differences) is the process of becoming older. The term refers especially to human beings, many animals, and fungi, whereas for example bacteria, perennial plants and some simple animals are potentially immortal. In the broader sense, ageing can refer to single cells within an organism which have ceased dividing (cellular senescence) or to the population of a species (population ageing). In humans, ageing represents the accumulation of changes in a human being over time,[1] encompassing physical, psychological, and social changes. Reaction time, for example, may slow with age, while knowledge of world events and wisdom may expand
[...More...]

"Ageing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Weaning
Weaning
Weaning
is the process of gradually introducing an infant mammal to what will be its adult diet and withdrawing the supply of its mother's milk. The process takes place only in mammals, as only mammals produce milk. The infant is considered to be fully weaned once it is no longer fed any breast milk (or bottled substitute).Contents1 Humans1.1 Weaning
Weaning
conflict 1.2 Age2 In other mammals2.1 In cattle 2.2 In horses 2.3 In dogs 2.4 In rats3 See also 4 ReferencesHumans[edit]The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with the United States and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve this article, discuss the issue on the talk page, or create a new article, as appropriate. (November 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)How and when to wean a human infant is controversial
[...More...]

"Weaning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chipmunk
3, see textChipmunks are small, striped rodents of the family Sciuridae. Chipmunks are found in North America, with the exception of the Siberian chipmunk
Siberian chipmunk
which is found primarily in Asia.Contents1 Taxonomy and systematics 2 Diet 3 Ecology and life history 4 Species 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksTaxonomy and systematics Chipmunks may be classified either as a single genus, Tamias (Greek: ταμίας), or as three genera: Tamias, which includes the eastern chipmunk; Eutamias, which includes the Siberian chipmunk; a
[...More...]

"Chipmunk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mouse
A mouse (Mus), plural mice is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter. Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild
[...More...]

"Mouse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rabbit
Rabbits are small mammals in the family Leporidae
Leporidae
of the order Lagomorpha
Lagomorpha
(along with the hare and the pika). Oryctolagus cuniculus includes the European rabbit
European rabbit
species and its descendants, the world's 305 breeds[1] of domestic rabbit. Sylvilagus
Sylvilagus
includes thirteen wild rabbit species, among them the seven types of cottontail. The European rabbit, which has been introduced on every continent except Antartica, is familiar throughout the world as a wild prey animal and as a domesticated form of livestock and pet
[...More...]

"Rabbit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Obligate Carnivore
A carnivore /ˈkɑːrnɪvɔːr/, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.[1][2] Animals that depend solely on animal flesh for their nutrient requirements are called obligate carnivores while those that also consume non-animal food are called facultative carnivores.[2] Omnivores also consume both animal and non-animal food, and, apart from the more general definition, there is no clearly defined ratio of plant to animal material that would distinguish a facultative carnivore from an omnivore.[3] A carnivore that sits at the top of the food chain is termed an apex predator. The word "carnivore" is only refers to the mammalian order Carnivora, but this is somewhat misleading
[...More...]

"Obligate Carnivore" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rodent
Anomaluromorpha Castorimorpha Hystricomorpha
Hystricomorpha
(incl. Caviomorpha) Myomorpha SciuromorphaCombined range of all rodent species (not including introduced populations)Rodents (from Latin
Latin
rodere, "to gnaw") are mammals of the order Rodentia, which are characterized by a single pair of continuously growing incisors in each of the upper and lower jaws. About 40% of all mammal species are rodents; they are found in vast numbers on all continents except Antarctica
[...More...]

"Rodent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Squirrel
and see textSquirrels are members of the family Sciuridae, a family that includes small or medium-size rodents. The squirrel family includes tree squirrels, ground squirrels, chipmunks, marmots (including woodchucks), flying squirrels, and prairie dogs amongst other rodents. Squirrels are indigenous to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa, and were introduced by humans to Australia.[1] The earliest known squirrels date from the Eocene
Eocene
period and are most closely related to the mountain beaver and to the dormouse among other living rodent families.Contents1 Etymology 2 Characteristics 3 Behavior3.1 Feeding4 Taxonomy 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEtymology That word "squirrel", first attested in 1327, comes from the Anglo-Norman esquirel which is from the Old French
Old French
escurel, the reflex of a Latin word sciurus
[...More...]

"Squirrel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pituitary Gland
In vertebrate anatomy, the pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 grams (0.018 oz) in humans. It is a protrusion off the bottom of the hypothalamus at the base of the brain. The hypophysis rests upon the hypophysial fossa of the sphenoid bone in the center of the middle cranial fossa and is surrounded by a small bony cavity (sella turcica) covered by a dural fold (diaphragma sellae).[2] The anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) is a lobe of the gland that regulates several physiological processes (including stress, growth, reproduction, and lactation). The intermediate lobe synthesizes and secretes melanocyte-stimulating hormone
[...More...]

"Pituitary Gland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shrew
A shrew (family Soricidae) is a small mole-like mammal classified in the order Eulipotyphla. True shrews are not to be confused with West Indies shrews, treeshrews, otter shrews, or elephant shrews, which belong to different families or orders. Although its external appearance is generally that of a long-nosed mouse, a shrew is not a rodent, as mice are. It is in fact a much closer relative of hedgehogs and moles, and related to rodents only in that both belong to the Boreoeutheria
Boreoeutheria
Magnorder
Magnorder
(along with humans, monkeys, cats, dogs, horses, rhinos, cows, pigs, whales, bats and others)
[...More...]

"Shrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.