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London Broil
London broil
London broil
is a beef dish made by broiling marinated beef, then cutting it across the grain into thin strips. Despite its name, the dish and the terminology are North American, not British.[1][2]Contents1 Cut 2 Preparation 3 In Canada 4 See also 5 ReferencesCut[edit] Although butchers may label top round steak or roast "London broil", the term does not refer to a specific cut of meat but to a method of preparation and cookery. Preparation[edit] The preparation of London broil
London broil
typically involves marinating the meat for several hours followed by high heat searing in an oven broiler or outdoor grill. It is then served in thin slices, cut across the grain. If cut and used for sandwiches, the meat is usually rarer than traditional roast beef. In Canada[edit] In parts of central Canada, a ground meat patty wrapped in flank or round steak is known as a London broil
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Curing (food Preservation)
Curing is any of various food preservation and flavoring processes of foods such as meat, fish and vegetables, by the addition of combinations of salt, nitrates, nitrites,[1] or sugar, with the aim of drawing moisture out of the food by the process of osmosis. Many curing processes also involve smoking, spicing, or cooking. Dehydration was the earliest form of food curing.[1] Because curing increases the solute concentration in the food and hence decreases its water potential, the food becomes inhospitable for the microbe growth that causes food spoilage. Curing can be traced back to antiquity, and was the primary way of preserving meat and fish until the late 19th century. Nitrates and nitrites, in conjunction with salt, are the most common agents in curing meat, because they further inhibit the growth of Clostridium botulinum
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Surf And Turf
Surf and turf
Surf and turf
or surf 'n' turf is a main course which combines seafood and red meat.[1][2] The seafood used may be lobster,[3] prawns, or shrimp,[4] which may be steamed, grilled or breaded and fried. When served with lobster, the lobster tail[5] or a whole lobster[6] may be served with the dish. The meat is typically beef steak, although others may be used. One standard combination is lobster tail and filet mignon.[3] Surf and turf
Surf and turf
is eaten in steakhouses in the U.S., Canada[5] and Australia, and may also be available in some British/Irish-style pubs in those countries.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Variations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] It is unclear where the term originated
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Shawarma
Shawarma
Shawarma
(Arabic: شاورما‎) also spelled shawurma or shawerma, is a Levantine meat preparation, where lamb, chicken, turkey, beef, veal, or mixed meats are placed on a spit (commonly a vertical spit in restaurants), and may be grilled for as long as a day.[2][3] Shavings are cut off the block of meat for serving, and the remainder of the block of meat is kept heated on the rotating spit. Shawarma
Shawarma
can be served on a plate (generally with accompaniments), or as a sandwich or wrap. Shawarma
Shawarma
is usually eaten with tabbouleh, fattoush, taboon bread, tomato, and cucumber. Toppings include tahini, hummus, pickled turnips, and amba
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Steak De Burgo
Steak de Burgo
Steak de Burgo
is a steak dish and a regional specialty in the Midwest, specifically Des Moines, Iowa. The dish usually consists of a beef tenderloin either topped with butter, garlic, and Italian herbs, or served in a sauce consisting of those same ingredients.[1][2][3][4] See also[edit]Food portalList of regional dishes of the United States List of steak dishesReferences[edit]^ Howe, Olivia Gonzalez (January 31, 2006). "Jesse's Embers: Steak de Burgo Recipe", Des Moines Register. Retrieved January 3, 2016. ^ Fales, Andy (February 27, 2013). "Signature Dish: Des Moines' Iconic Steak", WHO TV. Retrieved January 3, 2016. ^ Duncan, Jim (July 30, 2009). "Dining Icons: Des Moines' Tourism Niche", Cityview Online. Retrieved January 3, 2016. ^ "Steak De Burgo", Iowa Beef Industry Council. Retrieved January 3, 2016.This meat-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis American cuisine–related article is a stub
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Steak Frites
Steak-frites,[a] meaning "steak [and] fries" in French, is a very common and popular dish served in brasseries throughout Europe consisting of steak paired with French fries. It is considered by some to be the national dish of Belgium
Belgium
and France, which both claim to be the place of its invention.[1] Historically, the rump steak was commonly used for this dish
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Barbecue
Barbecue
Barbecue
or barbeque (informally BBQ or barbie) is both a cooking method and an apparatus/machine. Barbecuing is done slowly over low, indirect heat and the food is flavored by the smoking process, while grilling, a related process, is generally done quickly over moderate-to-high direct heat that produces little smoke. Barbecue
Barbecue
can refer to the cooking method itself, the meat cooked this way, the cooking apparatus/machine used (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue"), or to a type of social event featuring this type of cooking. Barbecuing is usually done outdoors by smoking the meat over wood or charcoal. Restaurant barbecue may be cooked in large, specially-designed brick or metal ovens. Barbecue
Barbecue
is practiced in many areas of the world and there are numerous regional variations. Barbecuing techniques include smoking, roasting or baking, braising and grilling
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Braising
Braising
Braising
(from the French word braiser) is a combination-cooking method that uses both wet and dry heats: typically, the food is first seared at a high temperature, then finished in a covered pot at a lower temperature while sitting in some (variable) amount of liquid (which may also add flavor). Braising
Braising
of meat is often referred to as pot roasting, though some authors make a distinction between the two methods, based on whether additional liquid is added.[1][2]Contents1 Method 2 Techniques 3 Braised foods 4 See also 5 ReferencesMethod[edit] Braising
Braising
relies on heat, time, and moisture to break down the tough connective tissue (collagen) that binds together the muscle fibers collectively called meat, making it an ideal way to cook tougher, more affordable cuts. Many classic braised dishes (e.g., coq au vin) are highly evolved methods of cooking tough and otherwise unpalatable foods
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Meat Chop
A meat chop is a cut of meat cut perpendicular to the spine, and usually containing a rib or riblet part of a vertebra and served as an individual portion. The most common kinds of meat chops are pork and lamb. A thin boneless chop, or one with only the rib bone, may be called a cutlet, though the difference is not always clear. The term "chop" is not usually used for beef, but a T-bone steak
T-bone steak
is essentially a loin chop, and a rib steak a rib chop.Contents1 Butchery 2 Cooking 3 History 4 See also 5 ReferencesButchery[edit] Chops are generally cut from pork, lamb, veal, or mutton, but also from game such as venison. They are cut perpendicular to the spine, and usually include a rib and a section of spine. They are typically cut from 10–50 mm thick. In United States
United States
markets, pork chops are classified as "center-cut" or "shoulder"
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Swiss Steak
Swiss steak
Swiss steak
is meat, usually beef, prepared by means of rolling or pounding, and then braising in a cooking pot of stewed tomatoes, mushroom sauce, or some other sauce, either on a stove / log (cooker) or in an oven. In England and in some parts of the United States such as the Deep South, it is also called smothered steak. The dish does not stem from Switzerland, as the name suggests, but from the technique of tenderizing by pounding or rolling called "swissing".[1] See also[edit]Smothering (food) Salisbury steakReferences[edit]^ Robert Allen Palmatier (2000). Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 309. ISBN 978-0-313-31436-0. This meat-related article is a stub
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Suadero
Suadero, in Mexican cuisine, is a thin cut of meat from the intermediate part of the cow or pork between the belly and the leg.[1] Suadero
Suadero
is noted for having a smooth texture rather than a muscle grain. Typically, suadero is fried and used as a taco filling. Suadero, also known as matambre, is the name of a very thin cut of beef in Argentina, Paraguay
Paraguay
and Uruguay, taken from between the skin and the ribs,[1] a sort of flank steak. In Mexico
Mexico
is very usual to use pork instead. References[edit]^ Froeb, Ian (January 24, 2008). "What Is Suadero? (Besides Tasty, That Is)". Riverfront Times. Retrieved April 5, 2014. Aeberhard, Danny, Andrew Benson, and Lucy Philips. The Rough Guide to Argentina, Second Edition. New York: The Penguin Group, 2005. Global Gourmet: Argentina. 2006. 24 January 2006This Mexican cuisine–related article is a stub
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Steak Sandwich
A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak
Steak
sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and french fries. According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States
United States
was at Louis' Lunch
Louis' Lunch
of New Haven, Connecticut.[1]Contents1 Cheesesteak 2 Italian beef 3 French dip 4 Roast beef 5 Beef on weck 6 Steak
Steak
bomb 7 Other variations 8 See also 9 ReferencesCheesesteak[edit] Main article: CheesesteakA cheesesteak sandwichA cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll
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Finger Steaks
Finger steaks
Finger steaks
consist of 2–3” long by 1/2" wide strips of steak (usually top sirloin), battered with a tempura-like or flour batter, and deep-fried in oil. Typically they are served with French fries
French fries
and a buttered piece of thick toast. They are commonly found in restaurants, bars, and fast-food joints (either handmade or of the frozen variety) in Southern Idaho
Idaho
and less frequently in nearby states but are not well known outside the Inland Northwest.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Finger steaks
Finger steaks
are purported to have been first served in a restaurant setting at Boise, Idaho’s “Milo’s Torch Lounge” (aka The Torch) in 1957[1]. Milo Bybee claimed to have invented finger steaks while wondering what to do with leftover tenderloin scraps when he was working as a butcher for the U.S
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Steak Burger
A steak burger is a type of sandwich prepared using steak as a primary ingredient. In the United States, the first steak burger offered to consumers appears to have been invented in 1934. Beefsteak
Beefsteak
is typically used, although other meats can also be made into steak burgers. They may be prepared with various accompaniments and toppings, and several restaurant versions have existed in the past and continue to be prepared in contemporary times.Contents1 History 2 Preparation2.1 Accompaniments3 Restaurant versions3.1 Burger King4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Use of the term "steakburger" dates to the 1920s in the United States.[1] In the U.S. in 1934, A.H
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Steak Au Poivre
Steak
Steak
au poivre (French pronunciation: ​[stɛk‿o pwavʁ], Quebec French pronunciation : [stei̯k‿o pwɑːvʁ]) or pepper steak is a French dish that consists of a steak, traditionally a filet mignon, coated with loosely cracked peppercorns and then cooked.[1][2] The peppercorns form a crust on the steak when cooked and provide a pungent but complementary counterpoint to the rich flavor of the high-quality beef. Preparation and ingredients[edit] The peppercorn crust itself is made by placing the steak in a bed of cracked black (or mixed) peppercorns. Typically, the steak is seared in a hot skillet with a small amount of butter and oil. The steak is seared at a high temperature to cook the outside quickly and form the crust while leaving the interior rare to medium-rare
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Steak And Kidney Pudding
Steak
Steak
and kidney pudding is a savoury pudding made by enclosing diced beef steak and lamb's or pig's kidney pieces in gravy in a suet pastry.Contents1 History 2 Nickname 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] An early mention of Steak
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