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London Stock Exchange
The London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange (LSE) is a stock exchange located in the City of London, England. As of December 2014[update], the Exchange had a market capitalisation of US$6.06 trillion (short scale), making it the third-largest stock exchange in the world[2] by this measurement (the largest in Europe ahead of Euronext). The Exchange was founded in 1801 and its current premises are situated in Paternoster Square
Paternoster Square
close to St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral
in the City of London. The Exchange is part of the London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange Group. London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange is one of the world’s oldest stock exchanges and can trace its history back more than 300 years
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Provisional Irish Republican Army
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(incl. British Army, Royal Ulster Constabulary[5][6][7] Ulster
Ulster
loyalist paramilitaries[8] Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
"Free State" (An Garda Síochána ; Irish Army (Although the IRA's own rules prohibited their Volunteers from carrying out attacks against the "Free State".)The Provisional Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA or Provisional IRA) was[9][10][11][12] an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought end of British involvement in Northern Ireland[13], facilitate the reunification of Ireland
Ireland
and to bring about an independent socialist[2] republic encompassing all of Ireland.[14][15] It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles
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Telegraph
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Elizabeth I Of England
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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Seven Years' War
Anglo-Prusso-Portuguese coalition victoryTreaty of Saint Petersburg (1762) Treaty of Hamburg (1762) Treaty of Paris (1763) Treaty of Hubertusburg
Treaty of Hubertusburg
(1763)Territorial changes Status quo ante bellum in Europe. Transfer of colonial possessions between Great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal.France cedes its possessions east of the Mississippi River, Canada (except Saint-Pierre and Miquelon), the island of Grenada, and the Northern Circars
Northern Circars
in India
India
to Great Britain. France cedes Louisiana
Louisiana
and its territory west of the Mississippi River to Spain. Spain
Spain
cedes Florida to Great Britain. Four "neutral" Caribbean
Caribbean
islands divided between Britain (St. Vincent, Tobago, Dominica) and France (St
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Settlement (finance)
Settlement of securities is a business process whereby securities or interests in securities are delivered, usually against (in simultaneous exchange for) payment of money, to fulfill contractual obligations, such as those arising under securities trades. In the United States, the settlement date for marketable stocks is usually 2 business days or T+2[1] after the trade is executed, and for listed options and government securities it is usually 1 day after the execution. In Europe, settlement date has also been adopted as 2 business days settlement cycles T+2. As part of performance on the delivery obligations entailed by the trade, settlement involves the delivery of securities and the corresponding payment. A number of risks arise for the parties during the settlement interval, which are managed by the process of clearing, which follows trading and precedes settlement
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Default (finance)
In finance, default is failure to meet the legal obligations (or conditions) of a loan,[1] for example when a home buyer fails to make a mortgage payment, or when a corporation or government fails to pay a bond which has reached maturity. A national or sovereign default is the failure or refusal of a government to repay its national debt
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Ticker Tape
Ticker tape
Ticker tape
was the earliest digital electronic communications medium, transmitting stock price information over telegraph lines, in use between around 1870 through 1970. It consisted of a paper strip that ran through a machine called a stock ticker, which printed abbreviated company names as alphabetic symbols followed by numeric stock transaction price and volume information
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Monopolies And Mergers Commission
The Competition Commission was a non-departmental public body responsible for investigating mergers, markets and other enquiries related to regulated industries under competition law in the United Kingdom. It was a competition regulator under the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). It was tasked with ensuring healthy competition between companies in the UK for the ultimate benefit of consumers and the economy. The Competition Commission replaced the Monopolies and Mergers Commission on 1 April 1999
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Coat Of Arms
A coat of arms is an heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters, crest, and motto
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Airstrike
An airstrike or air strike[1] is an offensive operation carried out by attack aircraft. Air strikes are commonly delivered from aircraft such as fighters, bombers, ground attack aircraft, and attack helicopters. The official definition includes all sorts of targets, including enemy air targets, but in popular usage the term is usually narrowed to a tactical (small-scale) attack on a ground or naval objective. Weapons used in an airstrike can range from aircraft cannon and machine gun bullets, air-launched missiles and cruise missiles, to various types of bombs, glide bombs and even directed-energy weapons such as lasers. It is also commonly referred to as an air raid. In close air support, air strikes are usually controlled by trained observers for coordination with friendly ground troops in a manner derived from artillery tactics.Contents1 History 2 Non-combatant deaths 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section needs expansion
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Denham, Buckinghamshire
Denham is a village and civil parish in the South Bucks
South Bucks
district of Buckinghamshire, England. It is about four miles north west of Uxbridge
Uxbridge
and about two miles north of junction 1 of the M40 motorway. Denham contains the Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Golf Club.Contents1 Origin 2 Buildings 3 Development 4 Transport 5 Economy 6 Schools 7 Sports 8 Boundaries 9 Demography 10 Twinning 11 Notable residents 12 References 13 External linksOrigin[edit] The village name is derived from the Old English
Old English
for "homestead in a valley". It was listed in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086 as Deneham.[2] Buildings[edit] The Church of England
England
parish church of Saint Mary has a flint and stone Norman tower and Tudor monuments
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Second Great Fire Of London
The "Second Great Fire of London" is a name used at the time to refer to one of the most destructive air raids of the Blitz, over the night of 29–30 December 1940. For over three hours from 6:15 pm[1] over 24,000 high explosive bombs and 100,000 incendiary bombs were dropped.[2][1] The raid and the subsequent fire destroyed many Livery Halls and City churches and gutted the medieval Great Hall of the City's Guildhall. The largest continuous area of Blitz destruction anywhere in Britain occurred on this night, stretching south from Islington to the very edge of St Paul's Churchyard. The area destroyed was greater than that of the Great Fire of London in 1666, 274 years previously. The raid was timed to coincide with a particularly low tide on the River Thames, which made water difficult to obtain for fire fighting
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