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London And North Eastern Railway
The London
London
and North Eastern Railway (LNER) was the second largest (after LMS) of the "Big Four" railway companies created by the Railways Act 1921
Railways Act 1921
in Britain. It operated from 1 January 1923 until nationalisation on 1 January 1948
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Liquid Resistor
A liquid resistor is an electrical resistor in which the resistive element is a liquid. Fixed-value liquid resistors are typically used where very high power dissipation is required. They are used in the rotor circuits of large slip ring induction motors to control starting current, torque and to limit large electrical fault currents (while other protection systems operate to clear or isolate the fault). They typically have electrodes made of welded steel plate (galvanised to reduce corrosion), suspended by insulated connections in a conductive chemical solution held in a tank - which may be open or enclosed. The tank body is normally solidly grounded or earthed
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East Anglia
East Anglia
East Anglia
is a geographical area in the East of England. The area included has varied[1] but the legally defined NUTS 2 statistical unit comprises the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, including the City of Peterborough
Peterborough
unitary authority.[2] The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom of the East Angles, a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany.Contents1 Area 2 History 3 Geography3.1 Climate4 Transport 5 Universities 6 Enterprise zones 7 Symbols and culture 8 Tourism 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksArea[edit] Definitions of what constitutes East Anglia
East Anglia
vary
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Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
(RP: /ˌnjuːkɑːsəl əpɒn ˈtaɪn/ ( listen);[4] locally: /njuːˌkæsəl əpən ˈtaɪn/ ( listen)),[4] commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh
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Aberdeen, Scotland
Aberdeen
Aberdeen
(/æbərˈdiːn/ ( listen); Scots: Aiberdeen,  listen (help·info); Scottish Gaelic: Obar Dheathain [ˈopər ˈʝɛ.ɛɲ]; Latin: Aberdonia) is Scotland's third most populous city, one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas and the United Kingdom's 37th most populous built-up area, with an official population estimate of 196,670 for the city of Aberdeen[1] and 229,800 for the local authority area.[2] Nicknames include the Granite
Granite
City, the Grey City
City
and the Silver City with the Golden Sands
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UK General Strike Of 1926
The 1926 general strike in the United Kingdom was a general strike that lasted 9 days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926.[1] It was called by the General Council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for 1.2 million locked-out coal miners. Some 1.7 million workers went out, especially in transport and heavy industry. The government was prepared and enlisted middle class volunteers to maintain essential services. There was little violence and the TUC gave up in defeat
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Public Transport Timetable
A public transport timetable (also timetable and North American English schedule) is a document setting out information on service times, to assist passengers with planning a trip. Typically, the timetable will list the times when a service is scheduled to arrive at and depart from specified locations. It may show all movements at a particular location or all movements on a particular route or for a particular stop. Traditionally this information was provided in printed form, for example as a leaflet or poster. It is now also often available in a variety of electronic formats. In the 2000s public transport route planners / intermodal journey planners have proliferated and offer traveller the convenience that the computer program looks at all timetables so the traveller doesn't need to. A "timetable" may also refer to the same information in abstract form, not specifically published, e.g
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Inverness
Inverness
Inverness
(/ɪnvərˈnɛs/ ( listen); from the Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Nis [iɲɪɾʲˈniʃ], meaning "Mouth of the River Ness") is a city in the Scottish Highlands. It is the administrative centre for the Highland council area,[2] and is regarded as the capital of the Highlands
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Pennines
The Pennines
Pennines
/ˈpɛnaɪnz/, also known as the Pennine Chain or Pennine Hills,[1] are a range of mountains and hills in England separating North West England
North West England
from Yorkshire
Yorkshire
and North East England. Often described as the "backbone of England",[2][3][4] the Pennine Hills form a more-or-less continuous range stretching northwards from the Peak District
Peak District
in the northern Midlands, through the South Pennines, Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Dales and North Pennines
North Pennines
up to the Tyne Gap, which separates the range from the Cheviot Hills
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York
York
York
(/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen)) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of the historic county of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum
Eboracum
in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Darlington
Darlington
Darlington
is a large market town in County Durham, in North East England. With a population of 92,363[2] in 2011, the town lies on the River Skerne, a tributary of the River Tees.[3][4] The town is administered as part of the Borough of Darlington. The town owes much of its development to the influence of local Quaker
Quaker
families in the Georgian and Victorian era, and who provided much of the finance and vision in creating the Stockton and Darlington
Darlington
Railway, the world's first steam locomotive powered, permanent passenger railway
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Inverurie
Inverurie
Inverurie
/ɪn.vəˈrʊəri/ (Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Uraidh[1] or Inbhir Uaraidh,[2] "mouth of the River Ury") is a Royal Burgh
Royal Burgh
and town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Scotland
at the confluence of the rivers Ury and Don, about 16 miles (26 km) north west of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
on the A96 road and is served by Inverurie railway station
Inverurie railway station
on the Aberdeen
Aberdeen
to Inverness Line
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Stratford, London
Stratford is an urban centre and town of Greater London
Greater London
in the London Borough of Newham in East London
East London
and is part of the Lower Lea Valley, England, United Kingdom. Stratford includes localities called Maryland, East Village, Chobham Manor
Chobham Manor
and Stratford City
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