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Locomotive Superintendent
Chief mechanical engineer and locomotive superintendent are titles applied by British, Australian, and New Zealand railway companies to the person ultimately responsible to the board of the company for the building and maintaining of the locomotives and rolling stock
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Locomotive
A locomotive or engine is a rail transport vehicle that provides the motive power for a train. If a locomotive is capable of carrying a payload, it is usually rather referred to as multiple units, motor coaches, railcars or power cars; the use of these self-propelled vehicles is increasingly common for passenger trains, but rare for freight (see CargoSprinter). Traditionally, locomotives pulled trains from the front
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Lancashire And Yorkshire Railway
The Lancashire
Lancashire
and Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Railway (L&YR) was a major British railway company before the 1923 Grouping. It was incorporated in 1847 from an amalgamation of several existing railways. It was the third-largest railway system based in Northern England
Northern England
(after the Midland and North Eastern Railways).[citation needed] The intensity of its service was reflected in the 1,650 locomotives it owned – it was by far the most densely trafficked system in the British Isles with more locomotives per mile than any other company[citation needed] – and that one third of its 738 signal boxes controlled junctions averaging one every 3.5 miles (6 km)
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SS Great Western
SS Great Western
SS Great Western
of 1838, was an oak-hulled paddle-wheel steamship, the first steamship purpose-built for crossing the Atlantic, and the initial unit of the Great Western Steamship
Steamship
Company.[3] She was the largest passenger ship in the world from 1837 to 1839
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Rolling Stock
The term rolling stock in rail transport industry originally referred to any vehicles that move on a railway. It has since expanded to include the wheeled vehicles used by businesses on roadways.[1][2][3] It usually includes both powered and unpowered vehicles, for example locomotives, railroad cars, coaches, and wagons.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Overview 2 Code names 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Note that stock in the term is business related and used in a sense of inventory
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SS Great Eastern
SS Great Eastern
SS Great Eastern
was an iron sailing steamship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and built by J. Scott Russell & Co. at Millwall Iron
Iron
Works on the River Thames, London. She was by far the largest ship ever built at the time of her 1858 launch, and had the capacity to carry 4,000 passengers from England
England
to Australia
Australia
without refuelling. Her length of 692 feet (211 m) was only surpassed in 1899 by the 705-foot (215 m) 17,274-gross-ton RMS Oceanic, and her gross tonnage of 18,915 was only surpassed in 1901 by the 701-foot (214 m) 21,035-gross-ton RMS Celtic. The ship's five funnels were rare. These were later reduced to four. Brunel knew her affectionately as the "Great Babe". He died in 1859 shortly after her ill-fated maiden voyage, during which she was damaged by an explosion
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Millwall
Millwall
Millwall
is an area in London, on the southwestern side of the Isle of Dogs, in the London
London
Borough of Tower Hamlets. It lies to the immediate south and southwest of the commercial estates of West India Docks including Canary Wharf
Canary Wharf
and has a long shoreline along London's Tideway part of the River Thames
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Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Engineering
is the discipline that applies engineering, physics, and materials science principles to design, analyze, manufacture, and maintain mechanical systems. It is one of the oldest and broadest of the engineering disciplines. The mechanical engineering field requires an understanding of core areas including mechanics, dynamics, thermodynamics, materials science, structural analysis, and electricity. In addition to these core principles, mechanical engineers use tools such as computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and product life cycle management to design and analyze manufacturing plants, industrial equipment and machinery, heating and cooling systems, transport systems, aircraft, watercraft, robotics, medical devices, weapons, and others
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Greenfield Land
Greenfield land
Greenfield land
is undeveloped land in a city or rural area either used for agriculture or landscape design, or left to evolve naturally. These areas of land are usually agricultural or amenity properties being considered for urban development. Greenfield land
Greenfield land
can be unfenced open fields, urban lots or restricted closed properties, kept off limits to the general public by a private or government entity. Rather than building upon greenfield land, a developer may choose to redevelop brownfield or greyfield lands, areas that have been developed but left abandoned or underused. Use of term in cable industry[edit] A greenfield development is a welcome opportunity for a cable operator to choose (and install) new equipment, without having to consider any migration issues related to legacy equipment
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Swindon
Swindon
Swindon
(/ˈswɪndən/ ( listen)) is a large town in the ceremonial county of Wiltshire, South West England, midway between Bristol, 35 miles (56 kilometres) to the west, and Reading, the same distance to the east. London
London
is 71 miles (114 km) to the east, and Cardiff
Cardiff
is 60 miles (97 km) to the west. At the 2011 census, Swindon's built-up area had a population of 182,441.[1] Swindon
Swindon
became an Expanded Town under the Town Development Act 1952 and this led to a major increase in its population.[2] Swindon
Swindon
railway station is on the line from London
London
Paddington to Bristol. Swindon Borough Council is a unitary authority, independent of Wiltshire Council since 1997
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Crewe
Crewe
Crewe
/kruː/ is a railway town and civil parish within the borough of Cheshire
Cheshire
East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The area has a population of 84,863. Crewe
Crewe
is perhaps best known as a large railway junction and home to Crewe
Crewe
Works, for many years a major railway engineering facility for manufacturing and overhauling locomotives, but now much reduced in size. From 1946 until 2002 it was also the home of Rolls-Royce motor car production. The Pyms Lane factory on the west of the town now produces Bentley
Bentley
motor cars exclusively
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Railway Signalling
Railway
Railway
signalling is a system used to direct railway traffic and keep trains clear of each other at all times. Trains move on fixed rails, making them uniquely susceptible to collision. This susceptibility is exacerbated by the enormous weight and inertia of a train, which makes it difficult to quickly stop when encountering an obstacle. In the UK, the Regulation of Railways Act 1889
Regulation of Railways Act 1889
introduced a series of requirements on matters such as the implementation of interlocked block signalling and other safety measures as a direct result of the Armagh rail disaster
Armagh rail disaster
in that year. Most forms of train control involve movement authority being passed from those responsible for each section of a rail network (e.g., a signalman or stationmaster) to the train crew
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Robert Stephenson And Company
Robert Stephenson
Robert Stephenson
and Company was a locomotive manufacturing company founded in 1823. It was the first company set up specifically to build railway engines.Contents1 Foundation and early success 2 Rainhill trials 3 Long boiler designs 4 Crampton types 5 Important exports in twentieth century 6 Into the twentieth century 7 Mergers and closure 8 Redevelopment 9 See also 10 Further reading 11 References 12 Map locationsFoundation and early success[edit]Works offices in South Street, NewcastleThe company was set up in 1823 in Forth Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
in England
England
by George Stephenson, his son Robert, with Edward Pease and Michael Longridge (the owner of the ironworks at Bedlington). It was founded as part of their construction of the Stockton and Darlington Railway
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Railroad Switch
A railroad switch (AE), turnout, or [set of] points (BE) is a mechanical installation enabling railway trains to be guided from one track to another, such as at a railway junction or where a spur or siding branches off. The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions to direct a train coming from the point blades toward the straight path or the diverging path. A train moving from the narrow end toward the point blades (i.e. it will be directed to one of the two paths depending on the position of the points) is said to be executing a facing-point movement. Unless the switch is locked, a train coming from either of the converging directs will pass through the points onto the narrow end, regardless of the position of the points, as the vehicle's wheels will force the points to move
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Railway Semaphore Signal
Semaphore is of the earliest forms of fixed railway signals. These signals display their different indications to train drivers by changing the angle of inclination of a pivoted 'arm'. Semaphore signals were patented in the early 1840s by Joseph James Stevens, and soon became the most widely used form of mechanical signal
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Electrical Telegraph
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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