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Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
(NYSE: LMT) is an American global aerospace, defense, security and advanced technologies company with worldwide interests. It was formed by the merger of Lockheed Corporation
Lockheed Corporation
with Martin Marietta in March 1995. It is headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, in the Washington, DC, area. Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
employs approximately 100,000 people worldwide.[1] Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin
is one of the largest companies in the aerospace, defense, security, and technologies industry
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Horizontal Integration
Horizontal integration
Horizontal integration
is the process of a company increasing production of goods or services at the same part of the supply chain. A company may do this via internal expansion, acquisition or merger.[1][2][3] The process can lead to monopoly if a company captures the vast majority of the market for that product or service.[3] Horizontal integration
Horizontal integration
contrasts with vertical integration, where companies integrate multiple stages of production of a small number of production units.Contents1 Horizontal alliance 2 Aspects of horizontal integration 3 Media terms 4 Examples 5 See also 6 ReferencesHorizontal alliance[edit] Main article: horizontal alliance Horizontal integration
Horizontal integration
is related to horizontal alliance (also known as horizontal cooperation)
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Combat Aircraft
A military aircraft is any fixed-wing or rotary-wing aircraft that is operated by a legal or insurrectionary armed service of any type.[1] Military aircraft
Military aircraft
can be either combat or non-combat:Combat aircraft are designed to destroy enemy equipment using their own aircraft ordnance.[1] Combat aircraft are normally developed and procured only by military forces. Non-combat aircraft are not designed for combat as their primary function, but may carry weapons for self-defense
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Ballistic Missiles
A ballistic missile follows a ballistic trajectory to deliver one or more warheads on a predetermined target. These weapons are only guided during relatively brief periods of flight—most of their trajectory is unpowered, being governed by gravity and air resistance if in the atmosphere. Shorter range ballistic missiles stay within the Earth's atmosphere, while longer-ranged intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), are launched on a sub-orbital flight trajectory and spend most of their flight out of the atmosphere These weapons are in a distinct category from cruise missiles, which are aerodynamically guided in powered flight.Contents1 History 2 Flight 3 Advantages 4 Missile
Missile
types 5 Throw-weight5.1 Depressed trajectory6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit]Replica of V-2The earliest use of rockets as a weapon dates to the 13th Century (see History of rockets)
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Precision-guided Munition
A precision-guided munition (PGM, smart weapon, smart munition, smart bomb) is a guided munition intended to precisely hit a specific target, to minimize collateral damage and increase lethality against intended targets.[1] Because the damage effects of explosive weapons decrease with distance due to an inverse cube law, even modest improvements in accuracy (hence reduction in miss distance) enable a target to be attacked with fewer or smaller bombs
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Missile Defense Agency
The Missile Defense Agency
Missile Defense Agency
(MDA) is the section of the United States government's Department of Defense responsible for developing a layered defense against ballistic missiles. The agency has its origins in the Strategic Defense Initiative
Strategic Defense Initiative
(SDI) which was established in 1983 by Ronald Reagan. SDI initially concentrated on directed energy weapons that would be useful in disrupting a full-out attack by the Soviet Union's ICBM
ICBM
fleet. Many of these concepts proved infeasible, and a missile-based system was selected for deployment in 1987. Rapid changes in the strategic environment due to the rapid Dissolution of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
led, in 1993, to Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
focussing on theatre ballistic missiles and similar threats, and renaming it the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, BMDO
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Armoured Fighting Vehicle
An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is an armed combat vehicle protected by armour, generally combining operational mobility with tactical offensive and defensive capabilities. AFVs can be wheeled or tracked. Tanks, armoured cars, armoured self-propelled guns, and armoured personnel carriers are all examples of AFVs. The concept of a highly mobile and protected fighting unit has been around for centuries; from Hannibal's war elephants to Leonardo's war machines, military strategists endeavoured to maximize the mobility and survivability of their soldiers. Armoured fighting vehicles are classified according to their intended role on the battlefield and characteristics. This classification is not absolute; at different times different countries will classify the same vehicle in different roles. For example, armoured personnel carriers were generally replaced by infantry fighting vehicles in a similar role, but the latter has some capabilities lacking in the former
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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Electronic Warfare
Electronic warfare
Electronic warfare
(EW) is any action involving the use of the electromagnetic spectrum or directed energy to control the spectrum, attack of an enemy, or impede enemy assaults via the spectrum. The purpose of electronic warfare is to deny the opponent the advantage of, and ensure friendly unimpeded access to, the EM spectrum
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Sensor
In the broadest definition, a sensor is a device, module, or subsystem whose purpose is to detect events or changes in its environment and send the information to other electronics, frequently a computer processor. A sensor is always used with other electronics, whether as simple as a light or as complex as a computer. Sensors are used in everyday objects such as touch-sensitive elevator buttons (tactile sensor) and lamps which dim or brighten by touching the base, besides innumerable applications of which most people are never aware. With advances in micromachinery and easy-to-use microcontroller platforms, the uses of sensors have expanded beyond the traditional fields of temperature, pressure or flow measurement,[1] for example into MARG sensors. Moreover, analog sensors such as potentiometers and force-sensing resistors are still widely used
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Satellites
In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit. Such objects are sometimes called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth's Moon. In 1957 the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
launched the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1. Since then, about 6,600 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2013 estimate, 3,600 remained in orbit.[1] Of those, about 1,000 were operational;[2] while the rest have lived out their useful lives and become space debris. Approximately 500 operational satellites are in low-Earth orbit, 50 are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), and the rest are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km).[3] A few large satellites have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Spacecraft
A spacecraft is a vehicle or machine designed to fly in outer space. Spacecraft
Spacecraft
are used for a variety of purposes, including communications, earth observation, meteorology, navigation, space colonization, planetary exploration, and transportation of humans and cargo. On a sub-orbital spaceflight, a spacecraft enters space and then returns to the surface, without having gone into an orbit. For orbital spaceflights, spacecraft enter closed orbits around the Earth
Earth
or around other celestial bodies. Spacecraft
Spacecraft
used for human spaceflight carry people on board as crew or passengers from start or on orbit (space stations) only, whereas those used for robotic space missions operate either autonomously or telerobotically. Robotic spacecraft used to support scientific research are space probes. Robotic spacecraft that remain in orbit around a planetary body are artificial satellites
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