HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Lock-on After Launch
Lock-on after launch, or LOAL, is a capability of missile systems to lock-on to its target after being launched from its carrier vehicle. The term is normally used in reference to airborne weapons, especially air-to-air missiles. LOAL is an important part of modern weapon systems as it allows the weapons to be carried internally to increase stealth and then acquire the target once it has left the launching aircraft. LOAL systems normally rely on cuing from a helmet mounted sight or onboard sensors like radar or FLIR, and use a simple strapdown inertial guidance system to know where to look after launch. Examples of LOAL weapons include the ASRAAM
ASRAAM
air-to-air missile and later versions of the AGM-114 Hellfire
AGM-114 Hellfire
anti-tank missile
[...More...]

"Lock-on After Launch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radar Lock-on
Lock-on is a feature of many radar systems that allow it to automatically follow a selected target. Lock-on was first designed for the AI Mk. IX radar
AI Mk. IX radar
in the UK, where it was known as lock-follow or auto-follow. Its first operational use was in the US ground-based SCR-584 radar, which demonstrated the ability to easily track almost any airborne target, from aircraft to artillery shells. In the post-WWII era, the term became more widely used in connection to missile guidance concepts. Many modern anti-aircraft missiles use some form of semi-active radar homing, where the missile seeker listens for reflections of the launch platform's main radar. To provide a continuous signal, the radar is locked-onto the target, following it throughout the missile's flight
[...More...]

"Radar Lock-on" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Air-to-air Missile
An air-to-air missile (AAM) is a missile fired from an aircraft for the purpose of destroying another aircraft. AAMs are typically powered by one or more rocket motors, usually solid fueled but sometimes liquid fueled. Ramjet
Ramjet
engines, as used on the Meteor (missile)
Meteor (missile)
are emerging as propulsion that will enable future medium-range missiles to maintain higher average speed across their engagement envelope. Air-to-air missiles are broadly put in two groups. Those designed to engage opposing aircraft at ranges of less than 30 km are known as short-range or "within visual range" missiles (SRAAMs or WVRAAMs) and are sometimes called "dogfight" missiles because they are designed to optimize their agility rather than range. Most use infrared guidance and are called heat-seeking missiles
[...More...]

"Air-to-air Missile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helmet Mounted Sight
A helmet-mounted display (HMD) is a device used in aircraft to project information to the pilot's eyes. Its scope is similar to that of head-up displays (HUD) on an aircrew's visor or reticle. An HMD provides the pilot with situation awareness, an enhanced image of the scene, and in military applications cue weapons systems, to the direction their head is pointing
[...More...]

"Helmet Mounted Sight" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radar
Radar
Radar
is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio
Radio
waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar
Radar
was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II
[...More...]

"Radar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

FLIR
Forward looking infrared
Forward looking infrared
(FLIR) cameras, typically used on military and civilian aircraft, use a thermographic camera that senses infrared radiation.[1] The sensors installed in forward-looking infrared cameras—as well as those of other thermal imaging cameras—use detection of infrared radiation, typically emitted from a heat source (thermal radiation), to create an image assembled for video output. They can be used to help pilots and drivers steer their vehicles at night and in fog, or to detect warm objects against a cooler background. The wavelength of infrared that thermal imaging cameras detect is 3 to 12 μm, and differs significantly from that of night vision, which operates in the visible light and near-infrared ranges (0.4 to 1.0 μm).Contents1 Design 2 Properties 3 Origin of the term 4 History 5 Uses 6 Cost 7 Police actions 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDesign[edit]FLIR imagery from a U.S
[...More...]

"FLIR" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inertial Guidance System
An inertial navigation system (INS) is a navigation aid that uses a computer, motion sensors (accelerometers), rotation sensors (gyroscopes) and occasionally magnetic sensors (magnetometers), to continuously calculate by dead reckoning the position, the orientation and the velocity (direction and speed of movement) of a moving object without the need for external references.[1] It is used on vehicles such as ships, aircraft, submarines, guided missiles and spacecraft. Other terms used to refer to inertial navigation systems or closely related devices include inertial guidance system, inertial instrument, inertial measurement unit (IMU) and many other variations. Older INS systems generally used an inertial platform as their mounting point to the vehicle and the terms are sometimes considered synonymous.Comparison of accuracy of various navigation systems. The radius of the circle indicates the accuracy
[...More...]

"Inertial Guidance System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

AGM-114 Hellfire
7 in (178 millimeters) (17.8 cm)Warhead High-explosive anti-tank (HEAT); 20 lb (9 kg) tandem anti-armor Metal augmented charge
Metal augmented charge
(MAC); 18 lb (8 kg) shaped charge Blast fragmentationEngine Solid-fuel rocketWingspan 13 in (0.33 m, 330 mm)Operational range546 yd – 5 miles (500 m – 8 km)Speed Mach 1.3 (995 mph; 450 m/s; 1591 km/h)Guidance systemSemi-active laser homing millimeter wave radar seekerLaunch platformRotary- and fixed-wing platforms, unmanned combat air vehicles, tripods, ships, and ground vehiclesThe AGM-114 Hellfire
AGM-114 Hellfire
is an air-to-surface missile (ASM) first developed for anti-armor use, but later models were developed for precision strikes against other target types, and have been used in a number of targeted killings of high-profile individuals
[...More...]

"AGM-114 Hellfire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anti-tank Missile
An anti-tank missile (ATM), anti-tank guided missile (ATGM), anti-tank guided weapon (ATGW) or anti-armor guided weapon, is a guided missile primarily designed to hit and destroy heavily armored military vehicles. ATGMs range in size from shoulder-launched weapons, which can be transported by a single soldier, to larger tripod-mounted weapons, which require a squad or team to transport and fire, to vehicle and aircraft mounted missile systems. The introduction to the modern battlefield of smaller, man-portable ATGMs with larger warheads has given infantry the ability to defeat light and medium tanks at great ranges, though main battle tanks (MBTs) using composite and reactive armors have proven to be resistant to smaller ATGMs.[1][2] Earlier infantry anti-tank weapons, such as anti-tank rifles, anti-tank rockets and magnetic anti-tank mines, had limited armor-penetration abilities and/or required a soldier to approach the target closely.Contents1 History 2 Countermeasures
[...More...]

"Anti-tank Missile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Weapon
A weapon, arm, or armament is any device used with intent to inflict damage or harm to living creatures, structures, or systems. Weapons are used to increase the efficacy and efficiency of activities such as hunting, crime, law enforcement, self-defense, and warfare. In broader context, weapons may be construed to include anything used to gain a strategic, material or mental advantage over an adversary or enemy target. While ordinary objects such as sticks, stones, cars, or pencils can be used as weapons, many are expressly designed for the purpose – ranging from simple implements such as clubs, swords and guns, to complicated modern intercontinental ballistic missiles, biological and cyberweapons
[...More...]

"Weapon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ASRAAM
The Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile, also known by its United States identifier AIM-132, is an imaging infrared homing ("heat seeking") air-to-air missile, produced by MBDA. It is currently in service in the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) and Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), replacing the AIM-9
AIM-9
Sidewinder. A SRAAM
SRAAM
is designed to outrange and outrun any other IR missile in service, allowing the pilot to fire and then turn away long before the opposing aircraft can close for a shot. It flies at well over Mach 3 to ranges as great as 50 kilometres (31 mi), considerably over double the range of earlier designs. It retains a 50g manoeuvrability provided by body lift technology coupled with tail control.[6][7] The project started as a British-German collaboration in the 1980s
[...More...]

"ASRAAM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lock-on After Launch
Lock-on after launch, or LOAL, is a capability of missile systems to lock-on to its target after being launched from its carrier vehicle. The term is normally used in reference to airborne weapons, especially air-to-air missiles. LOAL is an important part of modern weapon systems as it allows the weapons to be carried internally to increase stealth and then acquire the target once it has left the launching aircraft. LOAL systems normally rely on cuing from a helmet mounted sight or onboard sensors like radar or FLIR, and use a simple strapdown inertial guidance system to know where to look after launch. Examples of LOAL weapons include the ASRAAM
ASRAAM
air-to-air missile and later versions of the AGM-114 Hellfire
AGM-114 Hellfire
anti-tank missile
[...More...]

"Lock-on After Launch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.