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Location (geography)
The terms location and place in geography are used to identify a point or an area on the Earth's surface or elsewhere. The term location generally implies a higher degree of certainty than place, the latter often indicating an entity with an ambiguous boundary, relying more on human or social attributes of place identity and sense of place than on geometry.[1]Contents1 Types of location and place1.1 Relative location 1.2 Locality 1.3 Absolute location2 See also 3 ReferencesTypes of location and place[edit] Relative location[edit] A relative location, or situation, is described as a displacement from another site. An example is "3 miles northwest of Seattle". Locality[edit] A location, settlement, or populated place is likely to have a well-defined name but a boundary which is not well defined in varies by context. London, for instance, has a legal boundary, but this is unlikely to completely match with general usage
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Geography
Geography
Geography
(from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description"[1]) is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.[2] The first person to use the word "γεωγραφία" was Eratosthenes (276–194 BC).[3] Geography
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World Geodetic System
The World Geodetic System
World Geodetic System
(WGS) is a standard for use in cartography, geodesy, and navigation including GPS
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Guilford Press
Guilford Publications, Inc. is a New York City-based independent publisher founded in 1973 that specializes in publishing books, journals, software, and DVDs in psychology, psychiatry, the behavioral sciences, education, and geography
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Universal Code (cartography)
The Natural Area Code (or Universal Address) is a proprietary geocode system for identifying an area anywhere on the Earth, or a volume of space anywhere around the Earth. The use of thirty alphanumeric characters instead of only ten digits makes a NAC shorter than its numerical latitude/longitude equivalent.Contents1 Two-dimensional system 2 Extension to three dimensions 3 See also 4 External linksTwo-dimensional system[edit] Instead of numerical longitudes and latitudes, a grid with 30 rows and 30 columns - each cell denoted by the numbers 0-9 and the twenty consonants of the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
- is laid over the flattened globe
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Global Positioning System
The Global Positioning System
System
(GPS), originally Navstar GPS,[1] is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States
United States
Air Force.[2] It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver
GPS receiver
anywhere on or near the Earth
Earth
where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites.[3] Obstacles such as mountains and buildings block the relatively weak GPS
GPS
signals. The GPS
GPS
does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS
GPS
positioning information
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Equator
An equator is the intersection of the surface of a rotating sphere (such as a planet) with the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation and midway between its poles. On Earth, the Equator
Equator
is an imaginary line on the surface, equidistant from the North and South Poles, dividing the Earth
Earth
into Northern and Southern Hemispheres
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Greenwich, London
Greenwich[note 1] is an area of south east London, England, located 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross. It is located within the Royal Borough of Greenwich, to which it lends its name. Greenwich
Greenwich
is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian
Greenwich Meridian
(0° longitude) and Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia
Palace of Placentia
from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I
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Prime Meridian (Greenwich)
Coordinates: 51°28′40.12″N 0°00′05.31″W / 51.4778111°N 0.0014750°W / 51.4778111; -0.0014750Tourists taking pictures with the Prime Meridian monument Laser
Laser
projected from the Royal Observatory in Greenwich
Greenwich
marking the Prime meridian.A prime meridian, based at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in London, England,[1] was established by Sir George Airy in 1851. By 1884, over two-thirds of all ships and tonnage used it as the reference meridian on their charts and maps. In October of that year, at the behest of US President Chester A. Arthur, 41 delegates from 25 nations met in Washington, D.C., United States, for the International Meridian Conference
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WGS84
The World Geodetic System
World Geodetic System
(WGS) is a standard for use in cartography, geodesy, and navigation including GPS
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Lake Maracaibo
Lake
Lake
Maracaibo
Maracaibo
(Spanish: Lago de Maracaibo) is a large brackish tidal bay (or tidal estuary) in Venezuela
Venezuela
and an "inlet of the Caribbean Sea."[1][2][3][4] It is sometimes considered a lake rather than a bay or lagoon.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] It is connected to the Gulf of Venezuela
Venezuela
by Tablazo Strait which is 5.5 kilometres (3.4 mi) wide at the northern end. It is fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo. At 13,210 square kilometres (5,100 sq mi) it was once the largest lake in South America; the geological record shows that it has been a true lake in the past, and as such is one of the oldest lakes on Earth at 20–36 million years old.[14][15] Lake
Lake
Maracaibo
Maracaibo
acts as a major shipping route to the ports of Maracaibo
Maracaibo
and Cabimas
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Spherical Coordinate System
In mathematics, a spherical coordinate system is a coordinate system for three-dimensional space where the position of a point is specified by three numbers: the radial distance of that point from a fixed origin, its polar angle measured from a fixed zenith direction, and the azimuth angle of its orthogonal projection on a reference plane that passes through the origin and is orthogonal to the zenith, measured from a fixed reference direction on that plane. It can be seen as the three-dimensional version of the polar coordinate system. The radial distance is also called the radius or radial coordinate. The polar angle may be called colatitude, zenith angle, normal angle, or inclination angle. The use of symbols and the order of the coordinates differs between sources
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Point (spatial)
In modern mathematics, a point refers usually to an element of some set called a space. More specifically, in Euclidean geometry, a point is a primitive notion upon which the geometry is built, meaning that a point cannot be defined in terms of previously defined objects. That is, a point is defined only by some properties, called axioms, that it must satisfy. In particular, the geometric points do not have any length, area, volume or any other dimensional attribute
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