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Loan Words In Malayalam
Loan words in Malayalam, excluding the huge number of words from Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Tamil, originated mostly due to the centuries long interactions between the native population of Kerala
Kerala
and the trading (predominantly, spice trading) powers of the world. This included trading contacts with Arabia, Persia, Israel
Israel
and China
China
spanning millennia, and with European Colonial powers for several centuries.Contents1 European contributions1.1 Portuguese 1.2 Dutch 1.3 English2 Middle East contributions2.1 Aramaic or East Syriac 2.2 Arabic 2.3 Hebrew 2.4 Persian3 See also 4 ReferencesEuropean contributions[edit] Portuguese[edit] Most of the loan words from Portuguese language
Portuguese language
are for items which the native population lacked when the encounter with Portuguese empire happened from around the final years of the 15th century
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List Of Loanwords In Malayalam
Loan words in Malayalam, excluding the huge number of words from Sanskrit and Tamil, originated mostly due to the centuries long interactions between the native population of Kerala and the trading (predominantly, spice trading) powers of the world. This included trading contacts with Arabia, Persia, Israel and China spanning millennia, and with European Colonial powers for several centuries.Contents1 European contributions1.1 Portuguese 1.2 Dutch 1.3 English2 Middle East contributions2.1 Aramaic or East Syriac 2.2 Arabic 2.3 Hebrew 2.4 Persian3 See also 4 ReferencesEuropean contributions[edit] Portuguese[edit] Most of the loan words from Portuguese language are for items which the native population lacked when the encounter with Portuguese empire happened from around the final years of the 15th century. Portuguese was the lingua franca in Africa, Brazil, South Asia and parts of South East Asia during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries
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List Of Loanwords In Gujarati
Gujarati has a history of borrowing words from other languages it has encountered. It has had many borrowings from Persian, Arabic, and Portuguese. In recent times, English words have also been used. However, to the extent at which they have been, the majority is not considered as real loanwords and thus will not be included here
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Avestan
Avestan
Avestan
/əˈvɛstən/,[2] also known historically as Zend, is a language known only from its use as the language of Zoroastrian scripture (the Avesta), from which it derives its name. The language is classified as an Iranian language, a branch of the Indo-Iranian languages within the Indo-European family
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Gomastha
Gomastha (also spelled Gumastha or Gumasta, Persian: agent[1]) described an Indian agent of the British East India
India
Company employed in the Company's colonies, to sign bonds, usually compellingly, by local weavers and artisans to deliver goods to the Company.[2] The prices of the goods were fixed by the gomasthas. The goods were exported by the Company to Europe and America.[2] A gomastha may also be described as ‘a paid manager of the private trader’s concerns’, who claimed ‘hardly any share in the profit and loss of his employer’s business’.[3]Contents1 Background 2 Style of working 3 Complaints against Gomastas 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Main article: British East India
India
Company In the 18th century, the East India
India
Company had established itself in India. Indian cotton and silk fabrics were in great demand worldwide and hence were of special interest to them
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Hindustani Etymology
Hindustānī, also known as Hindi-Urdu, comprises several closely related dialects in the northern, central and northwestern part of the Indian subcontinent. It encompasses two standardized registers in the forms of the official languages Hindi
Hindi
and Urdu, as well as several nonstandard dialects. Hindustani is not an immediate descendant of Sanskrit, but uses a large lexicon of loanwords.[1][2] Standard Hindi
Hindi
derives much of its formal and technical vocabulary from Sanskrit
Sanskrit
while standard Urdu
Urdu
derives much of its formal and technical vocabulary from Persian. Standard Hindi
Hindi
and Urdu
Urdu
are used primarily in public addresses and radio or TV news, while the everyday spoken language is one of the several varieties of Hindustani, whose vocabulary contains words drawn from Persian, Arabic, and Sanskrit
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List Of Loanwords In Sri Lankan Tamil
Loan words in Sri Lankan Tamil came about mostly due contact between colonial powers and the native population. Linguists study a language's lexicon for a number of reasons. Languages such as Tamil with centuries of literature and multi-cultural contact offer the chance to compare the various processes of lexical change. The words of foreign origin or loanwords illustrate those processes: calques, loanwords, the distinction between function words and content words. Note: For information on the transcription used, see National Library at Calcutta romanization and Tamil script.Contents1 European contribution1.1 Portuguese 1.2 Dutch 1.3 English1.3.1 Civil conflict terminology2 Sinhalese 3 Malay 4 Arabic 5 See also 6 ReferencesEuropean contribution[edit] Sri Lankan Tamil dialects are distinct from the Tamil dialects used in Tamil Nadu, Kerala and other states of India. They are used in Sri Lanka and in the Tamil diaspora
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Sri Lankan Portuguese Creole
Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
Indo-Portuguese, Ceylonese Portuguese Creole
Portuguese Creole
or Sri Lankan Portuguese Creole
Portuguese Creole
(SLPC) is a language spoken in Sri Lanka. While the predominant languages of the island are Sinhala and Tamil, the interaction of the Portuguese and the Sri Lankans led to the evolution of a new language, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
Portuguese Creole
Portuguese Creole
(SLPC), which flourished as a lingua franca on the island for over 350 years (16th to mid 19th centuries). SLPC continues to be spoken by an unknown, extremely small population.[3] All speakers of SLPC are members of the Burgher community: descendents of the Portuguese and Dutch who founded families in Sri Lanka
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Indo-Aryan Loanwords In Tamil
The Tamil language
Tamil language
has absorbed a large number of Indo-Aryan, Prakrit, Pali
Pali
and Sanskrit,[1][2] loanwords ever since the early 1st millennium CE, when the Sangam period
Sangam period
Chola kingdoms became influenced by spread of Jainism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and early Brahmanism. Many of these loans are obscured by adaptions to Tamil phonology.[3] This is an illustrative list of Tamil words of Indo-Aryan origin, classified based on type of borrowing. The words are transliterated according to IAST
IAST
system
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List Of Loanwords In Konkani
Legend has it that Lord Parashuram (Lord Vishnu's sixth incarnation) shot an arrow into the Arabian Sea from a mountain peak. The arrow hit Baannaavali (Benaulim) and made the sea recede, reclaiming the land of Goa.[1] The history of Goa goes back 20,000–30,000 years and Goans communicate in the Konkani language. Commercial commodities and communications were trades along the Silk Road around 120 BCE – 1450s CE. The commerce and communication initiated within, and continued between and among continents. Goans, the inhabitants of Goa were ruled by different non-secular rulers who were, Hindus, Muslims and Catholics. Coastal Goa during colonial times interacted with traders of same secular faith (e.g., Mohammedan, Christian), who communicated in different languages (e.g., Arabic, Portuguese, French, English)
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Tamil Loanwords In Other Languages
Tamil is an old language and due to its contact with the other languages from historical times, there are many loanwords from Tamil that are found in the other languages.Contents1 In English 2 In Malay 3 In Mauritian Creole 4 In Tagalog 5 In Korean 6 In Thai 7 In Sinhala7.1 In Sinhala words 7.2 In Sinhala verbs8 See also 9 ReferencesIn English[edit] Gregory James, a professor with the language center of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology believes that more than 100 words in the Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
have T
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Persian Language
Persian (/ˈpɜːrʒən/ or /ˈpɜːrʃən/), also known by its endonym Farsi[8][9] (فارسی fārsi [fɒːɾˈsiː] ( listen)), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(officially known as Dari since 1958),[10] and Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(officially known as Tajiki since the Soviet era),[11] and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran
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List Of Loanwords In Indonesian
The Indonesian language has absorbed many loanwords from other languages, including Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, Arabic, Persian, Portuguese, Dutch, Chinese and other Austronesian languages. Indonesian differs from the Malaysian language in a number of respects, primarily due to the different influences both languages experienced and also due to the fact that majority of Indonesians speaks their native language as their first. Bahasa Indonesia function as lingua franca that unites 200 various languages over the archipelago. Vice versa, many words of Malay-Indonesian origin have also been borrowed into English. Words borrowed into English (e.g., bamboo, orangutan, dugong, amok, and even "cooties") generally entered through Malay language by way of British colonial presence in Malaysia and Singapore, similar to the way the Dutch have been borrowing words from the various native Indonesian languages
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Portuguese Vocabulary
Most of the Portuguese vocabulary comes from Latin, because Portuguese is a Romance language. However, other languages that came into contact with it have also left their mark
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List Of English Words Of Dravidian Origin
This is a list of English words that are borrowed directly or ultimately from Dravidian languages. Dravidian languages include Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, and a number of other languages spoken mainly in South Asia. The list is by no means exhaustive. Some of the words can be traced to specific languages, but others have disputed or uncertain origins. Words of disputed or less certain origin are in the "Dravidian languages" list
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List Of English Words Of Indian Origin
This is a list of words in the English language that originated in the languages of India.Contents1 Hindi or Urdu 2 Malayalam 3 Sanskrit 4 Tamil 5 Other languages 6 External linksHindi or Urdu[edit]see: List of English words of Hindi or Urdu originMalayalam[edit]see: List of English words of Malayalam originSanskrit[edit]see: List of English words of Sanskrit originTamil[edit]see: List of English words from Tamil originBadhapadadam Other languages[edit]Adda, from Bengali, a group of people Bhut jolokia, from Assamese (ভূত জলকীয়া Bhut Zôlôkiya), a hot chili found in Assam and other parts of Northeast India Doolally, "mad, insane" from the town of Deolali Jute from Bengali, a fiberExternal links[edit]Category: Hindi derivations in Wiktionary Etymology of Selected Words of Indian Language Origin in Colonial & Postcolonial
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