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Llanito
Llanito
Llanito
or Yanito (pronounced [jaˈnito]) is a form of Spanish heavily laced with words from English and some from other languages such as Genoese, spoken in the British overseas territory
British overseas territory
of Gibraltar.[1] It is commonly marked by a great deal of code switching between Andalusian Spanish
Andalusian Spanish
and British English
British English
and by the use of anglicisms and loanwords from other Mediterranean languages and dialects.[2] Llanito
Llanito
is a Spanish word meaning "little plain"
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Tangiers
Tangier
Tangier
(/tænˈdʒɪər/; Arabic: طَنجة‎ Ṭanjah; Berber: ⵟⴰⵏⴵⴰ Ṭanja; old Berber name: ⵜⵉⵏⴳⵉ Tingi; adapted to Latin: Tingis; French: Tanger; Spanish: Tánger; also called Tangiers in English) is a major city in northwestern Morocco. It is located on the Maghreb
Maghreb
coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, where the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
meets the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Spartel. The town is the capital of the Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
region, as well as the Tangier-Assilah prefecture of Morocco. Many civilisations and cultures have impacted the history of Tangier starting from before the 5th century BC
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Islam In Gibraltar
According to a 2009 Pew Research Center
Pew Research Center
report, there are 1,000 Muslims
Muslims
in Gibraltar
Gibraltar
who constitute approximately 4% of the population.[1]History[edit] Historically, Gibraltar
Gibraltar
was first foothold of Islam in Europe
Islam in Europe
as Tariq Ibn Ziyad, a Moor military leader anchored herein 711
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Code-switching
In linguistics, code-switching occurs when a speaker alternates between two or more languages, or language varieties, in the context of a single conversation. Multilinguals, speakers of more than one language, sometimes use elements of multiple languages when conversing with each other. Thus, code-switching is the use of more than one linguistic variety in a manner consistent with the syntax and phonology of each variety. Code-switching is distinct from other language contact phenomena, such as borrowing, pidgins and creoles, loan translation (calques), and language transfer (language interference). Borrowing affects the lexicon, the words that make up a language, while code-switching takes place in individual utterances.[1][2][3] Speakers form and establish a pidgin language when two or more speakers who do not speak a common language form an intermediate, third language. On the other hand, speakers practice code-switching when they are each fluent in both languages
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Anglicisms
An Anglicism is a word or construction borrowed from English into another language. With the rise in Anglophone media and global spread of British and American cultures in the 20th and 21st centuries, many English terms have entered popular usage in other tongues. Technology-related English words like internet and computer are particularly common across the globe, as there are no pre-existing words for them. English words are sometimes imported verbatim, and sometimes adapted to the importing language in a process similar to anglicisation. In languages with non-Latin alphabets, these borrowed words can be written in the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
anyway, resulting in a text made up of a mixture of scripts; other times they are transliterated
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Campo De Gibraltar
Campo de Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkampo ðe xiβɾalˈtar], " Gibraltar
Gibraltar
Countryside") is a comarca (county) in the province of Cádiz, Spain, in the southwestern part of the autonomous community of Andalusia, the southernmost part of mainland Europe. It comprises the municipalities of Algeciras, La Línea de la Concepción, San Roque, Los Barrios, Castellar de la Frontera, Jimena de la Frontera and Tarifa. Its name comes from the municipal term of the town of Gibraltar, now a British Overseas Territory
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Ligurian Language (Romance)
Ligurian (ligure or lengua ligure) is a Gallo-Italic language spoken in Liguria
Liguria
in Northern Italy, parts of the Mediterranean coastal zone of France, Monaco
Monaco
and in the villages of Carloforte
Carloforte
and Calasetta
Calasetta
in Sardinia. It is part of the Gallo-Italic and Western Romance
Western Romance
dialect continuum
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Maltese Language
Maltese (Maltese: Malti) is the national language of Malta
Malta
and a co-official language of the country alongside English,[3] while also serving as an official language of the European Union, the only Semitic language so distinguished
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Portuguese Language
Argentina
Argentina
(South America) Indonesia
Indonesia
(Asia)[4][5] Senegal
Senegal
(Africa) South Africa
Africa
(Africa) Namibia
Namibia
(Africa) Uruguay
Uruguay
(South America)[6][7][8]Numerous international organisationsRegulated by International Portuguese Language Institute Academia Brasileira de Letras (Brazil) Academia das Ciências de Lisboa, Classe de Letras (Portugal) Academia Galega da Língua Portuguesa (Galicia) CPLPLanguage codesISO 639-1 ptISO 639-2 porISO 639-3 porGlottolog port1283[9]Linguasphere 51-AAA-a  Native language   Official and administrative language   Cultural or secondary language   Portuguese speaking minorities   Portuguese-based creole languagesThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols
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La Línea De La Concepción
La Línea de la Concepción
La Línea de la Concepción
(Spanish pronunciation: [la ˈlinea ðe la konθepˈθjon], more often referred to as La Línea) is a town in Spain, in the province of Cádiz
Cádiz
in Andalucia. It lies on the eastern isthmus of the Bay of Gibraltar, north of the Gibraltar– Spain
Spain
border, which lies north of the British overseas territory of Gibraltar, with which it has close economic and social links. It is situated on the sandy isthmus which unites the Rock of Gibraltar
Gibraltar
with the coast in the eastern flank of the Bay of Gibraltar, between Sierra Carbonera
Sierra Carbonera
and the Rock of Gibraltar. The town derives its name firstly from the línea or boundary line separating Spain
Spain
from Gibraltar, and secondly from the Immaculate Conception of Mary, the Mother of Jesus
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Multilingualism
Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is the use of more than one language, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population.[1] More than half of all Europeans
Europeans
claim to speak at least one language other than their mother tongue;[2] nevertheless, many of these are monoscriptual. Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness.[3] Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.[4] Multilingual speakers have acquired and maintained at least one language during childhood, the so-called first language (L1)
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Hispanicization
Hispanicisation or hispanisation, also known as castilianization or castilianisation (Spanish: castellanización)[1] refers to the process by which a place or person becomes influenced by Hispanic culture or a process of cultural and/or linguistic change in which something non-Hispanic becomes Hispanic
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Quaker Oats
The Quaker Oats
Quaker Oats
Company, known as Quaker, is an American food conglomerate based in Chicago
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