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Llandre
Llandre, or Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn, is a village in Ceredigion, Wales. It lies 5 miles north of Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
in the north-west of the county, on the road from Rhydypennau to Borth. To the north lies the village of Dôl-y-bont. The community is called Geneu'r Glyn.Contents1 Toponymy 2 Local sites 3 Station 4 Notable residents 5 References 6 External linksToponymy[edit] The traditional placename of the village was Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn  (English: St Michaels at the Mouth of the Valley), which derives from its location in the old cwmwd of Genau'r Glyn, part of the cantref of Penweddig. Before that, the name was Llanfihangel Castell Gwallter. The name changed to Llanfihangel Genau'r Glyn in the 16th century
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Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
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Cwmwd
A commote (Welsh cwmwd, sometimes spelt in older documents as cymwd, plural cymydau, less frequently cymydoedd),[1] was a secular division of land in Medieval
Medieval
Wales
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Ceredigion (UK Parliament Constituency)
Ceredigion, formerly Cardiganshire, is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In Ceredigion
Place
Place
may refer to:Contents1 Surname 2 Geography 3 Society 4 Mathematics 5 Gambling 6 Arts 7 Miscellaneous 8 See alsoSurname[edit] Place
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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County
A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposes,[1] in certain modern nations. The term is derived from the Old French
Old French
conté or cunté denoting a jurisdiction under the sovereignty of a count (earl) or a viscount.[2] The modern French is comté, and its equivalents in other languages are contea, contado, comtat, condado, Grafschaft, graafschap, Gau, etc. (cf
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Community (Wales)
A community (Welsh: cymuned) is a division of land in Wales
Wales
that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. Welsh communities are analogous to civil parishes in England. In 2016 there were 870 communities in Wales. Until 1974 Wales
Wales
was divided into civil parishes.[1] These were abolished by section 20 (6) of the Local Government Act 1972, and replaced by communities by section 27 of the same Act. The principal areas of Wales
Wales
are divided entirely into communities. Unlike in England, where unparished areas exist, no part of Wales
Wales
is outside a community, even in urban areas.[1] Most, but not all, communities are administered by Community councils, which are equivalent to English parish councils in terms of their powers and the way they operate. Welsh community councils may call themselves town councils unilaterally and may have city status granted by the Crown
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Placename
Toponymy is the study of place names (toponyms), their origins, meanings, use, and typology.Contents1 Etymology 2 Meaning and history 3 Issues 4 Noted toponymists 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "toponymy" is derived from the Greek words tópos (τόπος) "place" and ónoma (ὄνομα) "name". Toponymy is itself a branch of onomastics, the study of names of all kinds. Meaning and history[edit] Toponym is the general name for any place or geographical entity.[1] Related, more specific types of toponym include hydronym for a body of water and oronym for a mountain or hill
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Cantref
A cantref (Welsh pronunciation: [ˈkaːntrɛ(v)]; plural cantrefi) was a medieval Welsh land division, particularly important in the administration of Welsh law.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 The Cantrefi of Wales 4 See also 5 Citations 6 References 7 Further studyDescription[edit] Land in medieval Wales
Wales
was divided into cantrefi, which were themselves divided into smaller cymydau (commotes).[1] The word cantref is derived from cant ("a hundred") and tref ("town" in modern Welsh, but formerly used for much smaller settlements). The cantref is thought to be the original unit, with the commotes being a later division. Cantrefi could vary considerably in size: most were divided into two or three commotes, but the largest, the Cantref Mawr
Cantref Mawr
(or "Great Cantref") in Ystrad Tywi
Ystrad Tywi
(now in Carmarthenshire) was divided into seven commotes
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Wales (European Parliament Constituency)
Wales
Wales
is a constituency of the European Parliament. It currently elects 4 MEPs using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.[1]Contents1 Boundaries 2 History 3 Returned members 4 Election results 5 ReferencesBoundaries[edit] The constituency corresponds to the boundaries of Wales, one of the four countries of the United Kingdom.[2][3] History[edit] It was formed as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, replacing a number of single-member constituencies
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Penweddig (cantref)
Penweddig was a medieval cantref – a Welsh land division – of the kingdom of Ceredigion
Ceredigion
and later of the kingdom of Deheubarth) which is now in the county of Ceredigion, Wales. The community secondary school Ysgol Gyfun Gymunedol Penweddig
Ysgol Gyfun Gymunedol Penweddig
is named after the cantref.[citation needed] Commotes[edit] Penweddig comprised three commotes (cwmwd; plural cymydau):Genau'r Glyn Y Creuddyn PerfeddThis Ceredigion
Ceredigion
location article is a stub
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Antiquities
Antiquities
Antiquities
are objects from Antiquity, especially the civilizations of the Mediterranean: the Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
of Greece and Rome, Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and the other Ancient Near Eastern cultures. Artifacts from earlier periods such as the Mesolithic, and other civilizations from Asia and elsewhere may also be covered by the term
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Motte-and-bailey
A motte-and-bailey castle is a fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised earthwork called a motte, accompanied by an enclosed courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade. Relatively easy to build with unskilled, often forced, labour, but still militarily formidable, these castles were built across northern Europe from the 10th century onwards, spreading from Normandy
Normandy
and Anjou
Anjou
in France, into the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
in the 11th century. The Normans
Normans
introduced the design into England
England
and Wales following their invasion in 1066. Motte-and-bailey castles were adopted in Scotland, Ireland, the Low Countries
Low Countries
and Denmark
Denmark
in the 12th and 13th centuries
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Castle
A castle (from Latin: castellum) is a type of fortified structure built in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East
Middle East
during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
by European nobility. Scholars debate the scope of the word castle, but usually consider it to be the private fortified residence of a lord or noble. This is distinct from a palace, which is not fortified; from a fortress, which was not always a residence for nobility; and from a fortified settlement, which was a public defence – though there are many similarities among these types of construction. Usage of the term has varied over time and has been applied to structures as diverse as hill forts and country houses
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