HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Livy
Titus Livius Patavinus (Classical Latin: [ˈtɪ.tʊs ˈliː.wi.ʊs]; 64 or 59 BC – AD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Livy
Livy
/ˈlɪvi/ in English language
English language
sources – was a Roman historian. He wrote a monumental history of Rome
Rome
and the Roman people – Ab Urbe Condita Libri (Books from the Foundation of the City) – covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome
Rome
before the traditional foundation in 753 BC through the reign of Augustus
Augustus
in Livy's own lifetime
[...More...]

"Livy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Andrea Riccio
Andrea Riccio
Andrea Riccio
(c. 1470 – 1532) was an Italian sculptor and occasional architect, whose real name was Andrea Briosco, but is usually known by his sobriquet meaning "curly"; he is also known as Il Riccio and Andrea Crispus ("curly" in Latin). He is mainly known for small bronzes, often practical objects such as inkwells, door knockers or fire-dogs, exquisitely sculpted and decorated in a classicising Renaissance style. He was born at Padua, and first trained as a goldsmith by his father, Ambrogio di Cristoforo Briosco. He later began to study bronze casting under Bartolomeo Bellano, a pupil of Donatello.[citation needed] As an architect, he is known for the church of Santa Giustina in his native city
[...More...]

"Andrea Riccio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Declamation
Declamation or declamatio ( Latin
Latin
for "declaration") was a genre of ancient rhetoric and a mainstay of the Roman higher education system. It was separated into two component subgenres, the controversia, speeches of defense or prosecution in fictitious court cases, and the suasoria, in which the speaker advised a historical or legendary figure as to a course of action. Roman declamations survive in four corpora: the compilations of Seneca the Elder and Calpurnius Flaccus, as well as two sets of controversiae, the Major Declamations and Minor Declamations spuriously attributed to Quintilian. Declamation had its origin in the form of preliminary exercises for Greek students of rhetoric: works from the Greek declamatory tradition survive in works such as the collections of Sopater and Choricius of Gaza
[...More...]

"Declamation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
[...More...]

"Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mark Antony
Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N;[note 1] January 14, 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), commonly known in English as Mark Antony
Mark Antony
or Marc Antony, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire. Antony was a supporter of Julius Caesar, and served as one of his generals during the conquest of Gaul
Gaul
and the Civil War. Antony was appointed administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated political opponents in Greece, North Africa, and Spain. After Caesar's death in 44 BC, Antony joined forces with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, another of Caesar's generals, and Octavian, Caesar's great-nephew and adopted son, forming a three-man dictatorship known to historians as the Second Triumvirate
[...More...]

"Mark Antony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Aurelius Victor
Sextus Aurelius Victor (c. 320 – c. 390) was a historian and politician of the Roman Empire. Aurelius Victor was the author of a short history of imperial Rome, entitled De Caesaribus and covering the period from Augustus
Augustus
to Constantius II. The work was published in 361
[...More...]

"Aurelius Victor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Roman Civil Wars
There were several civil wars in ancient Rome, especially during the late Republic. The most famous of these are the war in the 40s BC between Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and the optimate faction of the senatorial elite initially led by Pompey
Pompey
and the subsequent war between Caesar's successors and die hard loyalists, Octavian
Octavian
and Mark Antony
Mark Antony
in the 30s BC
[...More...]

"Roman Civil Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cassiodorus
Flavius Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
Senator (c. 485 – c. 585),[1] commonly known as Cassiodorus, was a Roman statesman and writer serving in the administration of Theoderic the Great, king of the Ostrogoths. Senator was part of his surname, not his rank.Contents1 Life 2 Monastery
Monastery
at Vivarium 3 Educational philosophy 4 Classical connections 5 Lasting impact 6 Criticism 7 Works 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksLife[edit] Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
was born at Scylletium, near Catanzaro
Catanzaro
in Calabria, Italy. He began his career as councillor to his father, the governor of Sicily. While still young, he made a name for himself as learned in the ways of law. During his working life he worked as quaestor sacri palatii c
[...More...]

"Cassiodorus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Festus (historian)
Festus (fl. 4th century), whose name also appears in the manuscripts of his work as Rufus Festus, Ruffus Festus, Sextus Festus, Sextus Rufus, and Sextus, was a Late Roman historian and proconsul of Asia whose epitome Breviarium rerum gestarum populi Romani ("Summary of the history of Rome"[1]) was commissioned by the emperor Valens
Valens
in preparation for his war against Persia. It was completed about AD 370. The Breviarium covers the entire history of the Roman state from the foundation of the City until AD 364. The book consists of 30 chapters treating events in Roman history
Roman history
in terse overview, mainly focused on military and political conflicts. It is estimated as a work of very low quality.[2] Festus of Tridentum, magister memoriae (secretary) to Valens
Valens
and notoriously severe proconsul of the province of Asia, where he was sent to punish those implicated in the conspiracy of Theodorus
[...More...]

"Festus (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tiberius
Tiberius
Tiberius
(/taɪˈbɪəriəs/; Latin: Tiberius
Tiberius
Caesar Divi Augusti filius Augustus;[1][2] 16 November 42 BC – 16 March 37 AD) was Roman emperor from 14 AD to 37 AD, succeeding the first emperor, Augustus. Born to Tiberius
Tiberius
Claudius
Claudius
Nero
Nero
and Livia
Livia
Drusilla in a Claudian family, he was given the personal name Tiberius
Tiberius
Claudius
Claudius
Nero. His mother divorced Nero
Nero
and married Octavian–later to ascend the Empire as Augustus–who officially became his stepfather. Tiberius
Tiberius
would later marry Augustus' daughter (from his marriage to Scribonia), Julia the Elder, and even later be adopted by Augustus. Through the adoption, he officially became a Julian, assuming the name Tiberius Julius Caesar
[...More...]

"Tiberius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supernatural
The supernatural (Medieval Latin: supernātūrālis: supra "above" + naturalis "natural", first used: 1520–1530 AD)[1][2] is that which exists (or is claimed to exist), yet cannot be explained by laws of nature. Examples often include characteristics of or relating to ghosts, angels, gods, souls and spirits, non-material beings, or anything else considered beyond nature like magic, miracles, or etc..[3] Over time, things once thought to be supernatural such as lightning, seasons, and human senses have been shown to have entirely naturalistic explanations and origins. Some believe that which is considered supernatural will someday be discovered to be completely physical and natural. Those who believe only the physical world exists are called naturalists
[...More...]

"Supernatural" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Speaking
Public speaking
Public speaking
(also called oratory or oration) is the process or act of performing a speech to a live audience. This type of speech is deliberately structured with three general purposes: to inform, to persuade and to entertain. Public speaking
Public speaking
is commonly understood as formal, face-to-face speaking of a single person to a group of listeners.[1] Public speaking
Public speaking
can be governed by different rules and structures. For example, speeches about concepts do not necessarily have to be structured in any special way. However, there is a method behind giving it effectively. For this type of speech it would be good to describe that concept with examples that can relate to the audiences life
[...More...]

"Public Speaking" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biography
A biography, or simply bio, is a detailed description of a person's life. It involves more than just the basic facts like education, work, relationships, and death; it portrays a person's experience of these life events. Unlike a profile or curriculum vitae (résumé), a biography presents a subject's life story, highlighting various aspects of his or her life, including intimate details of experience, and may include an analysis of the subject's personality. Biographical works are usually non-fiction, but fiction can also be used to portray a person's life. One in-depth form of biographical coverage is called legacy writing. Works in diverse media, from literature to film, form the genre known as biography. An authorized biography is written with the permission, cooperation, and at times, participation of a subject or a subject's heirs
[...More...]

"Biography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
[...More...]

"History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Aulus Cremutius Cordus
Aulus Cremutius Cordus (died 25 AD) was a Roman historian. There are very few remaining fragments of his work, principally covering the civil war and the reign of Augustus Caesar. In 25 AD he was forced by Sejanus, who was praetorian prefect under Tiberius, to take his life after being accused of maiestas (treason).[1] He had been accused by Satrius Secundus of having eulogized Brutus and spoken of Cassius as the last of the Romans, which was considered an offence under the lex majestatis, and the senate ordered the burning of his writings. Seneca the Younger, however, tells us that he most likely incurred Sejanus' displeasure for criticising him, because Sejanus had commissioned a statue of himself. We also know from this source—a letter to Cordus' daughter Marcia—that he starved himself to death. She was also instrumental in saving his work, so that it could be published again under Caligula. Apart from Seneca, he is mentioned by Tacitus, Quintilian, Suetonius and Dio Cassius
[...More...]

"Aulus Cremutius Cordus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.