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Liu Ruyi
Liu Ruyi (208–194 BC), posthumously known as the "Suffering King of Zhao" (Zhào Yǐnwáng), was the only son of the first Han emperor Liu Bang's concubine Qi. He was a favorite of the emperor and appointed king or prince of Dai and Zhao, but loathed by his stepmother the empress Lü Zhi. Despite his stepbrother Liu Ying's protection, she finally succeeded in killing him in 194 BC. Life[edit] Liu Ruyi was the third son of Liu Bang, the founder of China's Han dynasty who became posthumously known as Emperor Gaozu ("High Ancestor"). He was the only son of the concubine Qi. As a boy, after his uncle Liu Zhong abandoned his post during a Xiongnu
Xiongnu
invasion, Liu Ruyi was created prince or king of Dai in 200 BC.[1] After Zhang Ao was falsely accused of conspiring against the throne, Ruyi replaced him as prince or king of Zhao in 198 BC
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Han Dynasty
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝206 BC–220 ADA map of the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin
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Sima Guang
Sima Guang
Sima Guang
(17 November 1019 – 11 October 1086), courtesy name Junshi, was a Chinese historian, writer, and politician. He was a high-ranking Song dynasty
Song dynasty
scholar-official and historian who authored the monumental history book Zizhi Tongjian. Sima was a political conservative who opposed Wang Anshi's reforms.Contents1 Early life 2 Professional life 3 Death 4 Achievement 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Sima Guang
Sima Guang
was named after his birthplace Guāng Prefecture, where his father Sima Chi (司馬池) served as a county magistrate in Guangshan County. The Simas were originally from Xia County in Shǎn Prefecture, and claimed descent from Sima Fu in the 3rd century. A famous anecdote relates how the young Sima Guang
Sima Guang
once saved a playmate who had fallen into an enormous vat full of water
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Hebei
Baoding
Baoding
(1928-58, 1966) Tianjin
Tianjin
(1958-65)
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Pingxiang County
Pingxiang County (simplified Chinese: 平乡县; traditional Chinese: 平鄉縣; pinyin: Píngxiāng Xiàn) is a county of Xingtai
Xingtai
City, in the southern Hebei
Hebei
province, China, located about 45 km (28 mi) from downtown Xingtai. It has a population of 280,000[when?] residing in an area of 406 km2 (157 sq mi)
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Chancellor (China)
The grand chancellor, also translated as counselor-in-chief, chancellor, chief councillor, chief minister, imperial chancellor, lieutenant chancellor and prime minister – was the highest-ranking executive official in the imperial Chinese government. The term was known by many different names throughout Chinese history, and the exact extent of the powers associated with the position fluctuated greatly, even during a particular dynasty.Contents1 History 2 List of chancellors of China2.1 List of chancellors of Shang dynasty 2.2 Zhou dynasty 2.3 List of chancellors of Qin dynasty
Qin

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Xiongnu
The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
(Chinese: 匈奴; Wade–Giles: Hsiung-nu) were a confederation[3] of nomadic peoples who, according to ancient Chinese sources, inhabited the eastern Asian Steppe
Asian Steppe
from the 3rd century BC to the late 1st century AD. Chinese sources report that Modu Chanyu, the supreme leader after 209 BC, founded the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
Empire.[4] After their previous overlords, the Yuezhi, migrated into Central Asia during the 2nd century BC, the Xiongnu
Xiongnu
became a dominant power on the steppes of north-east Central Asia, centred on an area known later as Mongolia. The Xiongnu
Xiongnu
were also active in areas now part of Siberia, Inner Mongolia, Gansu
Gansu
and Xinjiang
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Han Dynasty
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝206 BC–220 ADA map of the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin
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Chinese Concubine
Concubinage
Concubinage
(/kəŋˈkjuːbɪnɪdʒ/) is an interpersonal and sexual relationship in which the couple are not or cannot be married. The inability to marry may be due to multiple factors such as differences in social rank status, an existing marriage, religious or professional prohibitions (for example Roman soldiers), or a lack of recognition by appropriate authorities. The woman in such a relationship is referred to as a concubine (/ˈkɒŋkjəˌbaɪn/), and occasionally so is a man in such a relationship. The prevalence of concubinage and the status of rights and expectations of a concubine have varied among cultures, as have the rights of children of a concubine
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List Of Chinese Monarchs
This list of Chinese monarchs includes rulers of China
China
with various titles prior to the establishment of the Republic in 1912 CE. From the Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
to the Qin dynasty, rulers usually held the title "king" (Chinese: 王; pinyin: wáng). With the separation of China
China
into different Warring States, this title had become so common that the unifier of China, the first Qin Emperor Qin Shihuang
Qin Shihuang
created a new title for himself, that of "emperor" (pinyin: huángdì)
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Posthumous Name
A posthumous name is an honorary name given to royalty, nobles, and sometimes others, in East Asia
East Asia
after the person's death, and is used almost exclusively instead of one's personal name or other official titles during his life
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Wang (title)
Chinese sovereignty and peerage,[1] the nobility of China, was an important feature of the traditional social and political organization of Imperial China. While the concepts of hereditary sovereign and peerage titles and noble families were featured as early as the semi-mythical, early historical period, a settled system of nobility was established from the Zhou dynasty. In the subsequent millennia, this system was largely maintained in form, with some changes and additions, although the content constantly evolved. The last, well-developed system of noble titles was established under the Qing
Qing
dynasty. The AD-1911 republican Xinhai Revolution
Xinhai Revolution
saw the dissolution of the official imperial system although the new Republic of China government maintained noble titles like the Duke Yansheng
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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