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Little Red Riding Hood
"Little Red Riding Hood" is a European fairy tale about a young girl and a Big Bad Wolf.[1] Its origins can be traced back to the 10th century by several European folk tales, including one from Italy called The False Grandmother (Italian: La finta nonna), later written among others by Italo Calvino
Italo Calvino
in the Italian Folktales
Italian Folktales
collection; the best known versions were written by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
and the Brothers Grimm.[2]. The story has been changed considerably in various retellings and subjected to numerous modern adaptations and readings. Other names for the story are: "Little Red Ridinghood", "Little Red Cap" or simply "Red Riding Hood"
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A Vava Inouva
A Vava Inouva
A Vava Inouva
is the successful 1976 debut album by Idir, the Algerian singer of Kabyle music. It contains the big international hit of the same title "A Vava Inouva", also his debut single. It also contains other very important hits by him such as "Azwaw", "Zwit Rwit" (the origin for Khaled's "El harba wine), "Ssendu" and "Cfiy" Song: "A Vava Inouva"[edit] "A Vava Inouva", is the title track from the album. It was originally "A Baba-inu Ba" alternatively A baba inuba meaning My father to me, and is a fine example of Kabyle music. "A Vava Inouva" was a lullaby composed by Idir
Idir
and Ben Mohamed (real name Mohamed Benhamadouche) and was written for Nouara, a singer on Radio Algiers. However upon non acceptance by Nouara, Idir
Idir
decided to interpret the song himself accompanied by the singer Mila
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Book Of Jonah
The Book
Book
of Jonah
Jonah
is one of the Prophets
Prophets
in the Bible. It tells of a Hebrew prophet named Jonah
Jonah
son of Amittai who is sent by God to prophesy the destruction of Nineveh
Nineveh
but tries to escape the divine mission.[1] Set in the reign of Jeroboam II
Jeroboam II
(786–746 BC), it was probably written in the post-exilic period, some time between the late 5th to early 4th century BC.[2] The story has a long interpretive history and has become well-known through popular children's stories. In Judaism
Judaism
it is the Haftarah, read during the afternoon of Yom Kippur to instill reflection on God's willingness to forgive those who repent;[3] it remains a popular story among Christians
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Antithesis
Antithesis (Greek for "setting opposite", from ἀντί "against" and θέσις "placing") is used in writing or speech either as a proposition that contrasts with or reverses some previously mentioned proposition, or when two opposites are introduced together for contrasting effect.[1][2] Antithesis can be defined as "a figure of speech involving a seeming contradiction of ideas, words, clauses, or sentences within a balanced grammatical structure. Parallelism of expression serves to emphasize opposition of ideas".[3] An antithesis must always contain two ideas within one statement. The ideas may not be structurally opposite, but they serve to be functionally opposite when comparing two ideas for emphasis.[4] According to Aristotle, the use of an antithesis makes the audience better understand the point the speaker is trying to make. Further explained, the comparison of two situations or ideas makes choosing the correct one simpler
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Kabylia
Kabylie, or Kabylia (Berber languages: Tamurt en Yiqbayliyen ; Tazwawa; ⵜⴰⵎⵓⵔⵜ ⵏ ⵍⴻⵇⴱⴰⵢⴻⵍ), is a cultural region, natural region, and historical region in northern Algeria. It is part of the Tell Atlas
Tell Atlas
mountain range, and is located at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea. Kabylia covers several provinces of Algeria: the whole of Tizi Ouzou and Bejaia
Bejaia
(Bgayet), most of Bouira
Bouira
(Tubirett) and parts of the wilayas of Boumerdes, Jijel, Setif
Setif
and Bordj Bou Arreridj
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Idir
Hamid Cheriet (in Kabyle language
Kabyle language
Ḥamid Ceryat) better known by his stage name Idir
Idir
(in Kabyle language
Kabyle language
Yidir) (b. 1949 in Beni Yenni, Algeria[1]) is a Berber Algerian musician.Contents1 Biography 2 Identity and activism 3 Discography3.1 Albums 3.2 Singles4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Idir
Idir
was born in Beni Yenni, a Berber village in Haute-Kabylie. This farmer's son started studying Geology and was destined for a career in the petroleum industry before his rise to stardom. Idir
Idir
has been the ambassador of the Kabyle culture, especially the Kabyle music, with only his vocals and acoustic guitar. Idir
Idir
has always used his status to claim his Berber (Amazigh) identity
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Freyja
In Norse mythology, Freyja
Freyja
(/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse
Old Norse
for "(the) Lady") is a goddess associated with love, sex, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death. Freyja
Freyja
is the owner of the necklace Brísingamen, rides a chariot pulled by two cats, is accompanied by the boar Hildisvíni, and possesses a cloak of falcon feathers
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Stomach
The stomach (from ancient Greek στόμαχος, stomachos, stoma means mouth) is a muscular, hollow organ in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many other animals, including several invertebrates. The stomach has a dilated structure and functions as a vital digestive organ. In the digestive system the stomach is involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication (chewing). In humans and many other animals, the stomach is located between the oesophagus and the small intestine. It secretes digestive enzymes and gastric acid to aid in food digestion
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Peter And The Wolf
Peter and the Wolf
Peter and the Wolf
(Russian: «Пе́тя и волк», tr. "Pétya i volk", IPA: [ˈpʲetʲə i volk]) Op. 67, a 'symphonic fairy tale for children', is a musical composition written by Sergei Prokofiev
Sergei Prokofiev
in 1936. The narrator tells a children's story, while the orchestra illustrates it. It is Prokofiev's most frequently performed work, and one of the most frequently performed works in the entire classical repertoire
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Thor
In Norse mythology, Thor
Thor
(/θɔːr/; from Old Norse
Old Norse
Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing and fertility
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Margaret The Virgin
Margaret, known as Margaret of Antioch
Antioch
in the West, and as Saint Marina the Great Martyr (Greek: Ἁγία Μαρίνα, Hagía Marína, Coptic: Ϯⲁⲅⲓⲁ Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲛⲁ) in the East, is celebrated as a saint by the Eastern-Rite Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
on July 17 (Julian calendar) and on July 20 in the Western Rite Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Anglican Churches and on Epip 23 and Hathor 23 in the Coptic Churchs[3]. Her historical existence has been questioned by Rome. She was declared apocryphal by Pope Gelasius I in 494, but devotion to her revived in the West with the Crusades
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Arthur Rackham
Arthur Rackham
Arthur Rackham
(19 September 1867 – 6 September 1939) was an English book illustrator. Contents1 Biography 2 Significance 3 Technique 4 Notable works 5 Gallery 6 Influence 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Rackham was born in Lewisham, then still part of Kent
Kent
as one of 12 children. In 1884, at the age of 17, he was sent on an ocean voyage to Australia to improve his fragile health, accompanied by two aunts.[1] At the age of 18, he worked as a clerk at the Westminster Fire Office and began studying part-time at the Lambeth School of Art.[2] In 1892, he left his job and started working for the Westminster Budget as a reporter and illustrator. His first book illustrations were published in 1893 in To the Other Side by Thomas Rhodes, but his first serious commission was in 1894 for The Dolly Dialogues, the collected sketches of Anthony Hope, who later went on to write The Prisoner of Zenda
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Dragon
A dragon is a large, serpent-like legendary creature that appears in the folklore of many cultures around world. Beliefs about dragons vary drastically by region, but dragons in western cultures since the High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
have often been depicted as winged, horned, four-legged, and capable of breathing fire. Dragons
Dragons
in eastern cultures are usually depicted as wingless, four-legged, serpentine creatures with above-average intelligence. The earliest attested dragons resemble giant snakes. Dragon-like creatures are first described in the mythologies of the ancient Near East and appear in ancient Mesopotamian art and literature. Stories about storm-gods slaying giant serpents occur throughout nearly all Indo-European and Near Eastern mythologies
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Jim C. Hines
Jim C. Hines (born April 15, 1974) is an American fantasy writer.Contents1 Life and work 2 "Striking a Pose" 3 Bibliography3.1 The Goblin Quest Series 3.2 Princess Series 3.3 Magic ex Libris Series 3.4 Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse Series 3.5 Stand-alone works 3.6 Collections 3.7 Edited works4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Hines was a volunteer crisis counselor in East Lansing and worked as the Male Outreach Coordinator for the MSU Safe Place.[1] In 2008, he donated his archive to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) Collection in the department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Northern Illinois University.[2] He has been the author guest of honor at multiple conventions, and was the Toastmaster for the 2014 NASFiC (North American Science Fiction Convention). He's also served as Toastmaster for Icon (Iowa science fiction convention) since 2012
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Horace
Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace
Horace
(/ˈhɒrəs/ or /ˈhɔːrəs/), was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus
Augustus
(also known as Octavian). The rhetorician Quintilian
Quintilian
regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin
Latin
lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."[nb 1] Horace
Horace
also crafted elegant hexameter verses (Satires and Epistles) and caustic iambic poetry (Epodes)
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