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Little Clifton
Little Clifton
Little Clifton
is a civil parish in the district of Allerdale
Allerdale
located on the edge of the Lake District
Lake District
in the county of Cumbria, England. In 2001 it had a population of 391[2] and contained 170 households.[3] increasing to a population of 480 in the 2011 Census in 207 households.[4] The village of Little Clifton
Little Clifton
is 0.3 miles south of Bridgefoot
Bridgefoot
(although it is hard to tell where one ends and the other begins) and 3.5 miles east of Workington. The river Derwent is roughly 1 mile north of Little Clifton. In 1887 John Bartholomew, whilst writing for the Gazetteer of the British Isles, described Little Clifton as a township of 489 persons within a parish 3½ miles SE of Workington
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Cumbria
Cumbria
Cumbria
(English: /ˈkʌmbriə/ KUM-bree-ə; locally [ˈkʊmbɾiə] KUUM-bree-ə) is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England. The county and Cumbria
Cumbria
County Council, its local government, came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. Cumbria's county town is Carlisle, in the north of the county, and the only other major urban area is Barrow-in-Furness
Barrow-in-Furness
on the southwestern tip of the county. The county of Cumbria
Cumbria
consists of six districts (Allerdale, Barrow-in-Furness, Carlisle, Copeland, Eden and South Lakeland), and in 2008 had a population of just under half a million
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Rheged
Rheged
Rheged
(Welsh pronunciation: [ˈr̥ɛɡɛd]) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England
Northern England
and southern Scotland, during the post-Roman era and Early Middle Ages. It is recorded in several poetic and bardic sources, although its borders are not described in any of them
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Lake District
The Lake District, also known as the Lakes or Lakeland, is a mountainous region in North West England. A popular holiday destination, it is famous for its lakes, forests and mountains (or fells) and its associations with the early 19th century writings of William Wordsworth and the other Lake Poets as well as those of Beatrix Potter and John Ruskin. A National Park was established in 1951 and, following a minor extension in 2016, now covers an area of approximately 2,362 square kilometres.[2] It was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2017.[3] It is located entirely within the county of Cumbria, and all the land in England higher than 3,000 feet (914 m) above sea level lies within the National Park, including Scafell Pike, the highest mountain in England
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Westmorland
Westmorland (/ˈwɛstmərlənd/; formerly also spelt Westmoreland;[6] even older spellings are Westmerland and Westmereland) is a historic county in north west England. It formed an administrative county between 1889 and 1974, after which the whole county was administered by the new administrative county of Cumbria. In 2013, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Eric Pickles, formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Westmorland.[3][4][5]Contents1 Early history1.1 Division into wards2 Modern history 3 Coat of arms 4 Legacy 5 Notable people 6 Surnames 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly history[edit] At the time of Domesday Book in 1086, parts of the county were considered either to form part of Yorkshire or to be within the separate Kingdom of Strathclyde
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North Lancashire
North Lancashire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by two Members of Parliament. The constituency was created by the Great Reform Act of 1832 by the splitting of Lancashire constituency into Northern and Southern divisions. Great Reform Act of 1832 The Representation of the People Act 1832 reformed the distribution of seats in England and Wales. It introduced the principle of splitting the shire counties into divisions and returning two Members for each division rather than for the whole county and it also reformed the Parliamentary boroughs that were entitled to send Members to Parliament.8 Schedule A listed boroughs that were to be abolished and it included Newton. Schedule B listed boroughs to return a single Member to subsequent Parliaments and Clitheroe was listed. Schedules C and D of the Act listed the newly created Parliamentary boroughs
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North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county (or shire county) and larger ceremonial county in England. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. Created by the Local Government Act 1972,[2] it covers an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi), making it the largest county in England. The majority of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors lie within North Yorkshire's boundaries, and around 40% of the county is covered by National Parks
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Castlerigg
Coordinates: 54°35′31″N 3°06′40″W / 54.592°N 3.111°W / 54.592; -3.111 Castlerigg is an area of Keswick, Cumbria, England.[1][2] Castlerigg is named after a hill in the immediate area. Until the early twentieth century much of the area, comprising a large part of Keswick, was owned by the family living at Castlerigg Manor. Nowadays the Manor is a Catholic youth centre and only owns its own buildings and gardens. The word 'Castlerigg' is used to refer to one of the points of interest in that area, such as those cited below:Castlerigg Hall Castlerigg Manor Castlerigg Stone CircleReferences[edit]^ Ordnance Survey: Landranger map sheet 89 West Cumbria (Cockermouth & Wast Water) (Map). Ordnance Survey. 2011. ISBN 9780319232057.  ^ "Ordnance Survey: 1:50,000 Scale Gazetteer" (csv (download)). www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk. Ordnance Survey. 1 January 2016. Retrieved 30 January 2016. This Cumbria location article is a stub
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Celts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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Brigantes
The Brigantes
Brigantes
were a Celtic tribe who in pre-Roman times controlled the largest section of what would become Northern England. Their territory, often referred to as Brigantia, was centred in what was later known as Yorkshire
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Carlisle, Cumbria
Carlisle (/kɑːrˈlaɪl/ or locally /ˈkɑːrlaɪl/[1] from Cumbric: Caer
Caer
Luel[2][3] Scottish Gaelic: Cathair Luail[4]) is a city and the county town of Cumbria. Historically in Cumberland, it is also the administrative centre of the City of Carlisle
City of Carlisle
district in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers Eden, Caldew and Petteril, 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border.[5] It is the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria
Cumbria
County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Anglo Saxon
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Zinc
Zinc
Zinc
is a chemical element with symbol Zn and atomic number 30. It is the first element in group 12 of the periodic table. In some respects zinc is chemically similar to magnesium: both elements exhibit only one normal oxidation state (+2), and the Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions are of similar size. Zinc
Zinc
is the 24th most abundant element in Earth's crust and has five stable isotopes. The most common zinc ore is sphalerite (zinc blende), a zinc sulfide mineral. The largest workable lodes are in Australia, Asia, and the United States
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