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Little Big Soldier
Little Big Soldier
Little Big Soldier
(simplified Chinese: 大兵小将; traditional Chinese: 大兵小將; pinyin: Dà Bīng Xiǎo Jiàng; Jyutping: Daai6 Bing1 Siu2 Zeong1) is a 2010 action comedy film directed by Ding Sheng and produced and written by Jackie Chan, also starring Chan and Leehom Wang. The film was produced with a budget of US$25 million[1] and filmed between January 2009 and April 2009 at locations in Yunnan, China. According to Chan, the film was stuck in development hell for over 20 years.[2] Little Big Soldier
Little Big Soldier
takes place during the Warring States period
Warring States period
of China, and tells the story of three men and a horse.[1] An old foot soldier (Chan) and a young high-ranking general from a rival state (Wang) become the only survivors of a ruthless battle
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Hong Kong Action Cinema
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
action cinema is the principal source of the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
film industry's global fame. It combines elements from the action film, as codified by Hollywood, with Chinese storytelling, aesthetic traditions and filmmaking techniques, to create a culturally distinctive form that nevertheless has a wide transcultural appeal. In recent years, the flow has reversed somewhat, with American and European action films being heavily influenced by Hong Kong
Hong Kong
genre conventions. The first Hong Kong
Hong Kong
action films favoured the wuxia style, emphasizing mysticism and swordplay, but this trend was politically suppressed in the 1930s and replaced by kung fu films that depicted more down-to-earth unarmed martial arts, often featuring folk hero Wong Fei Hung
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Daniel Wu
Daniel Wu
Daniel Wu
Yin-cho (simplified Chinese: 吴彦祖; traditional Chinese: 吳彥祖; pinyin: Wú Yànzǔ; jyutping: ng4 jin6zou2; born September 30, 1974) is a Hong Kong and American actor, director and producer, and as of 2015, starring as Sunny in the AMC martial arts drama series Into the Badlands. Since his film debut in 1998, he has been featured in over 60 films.[1] He is known as a "flexible and distinctive" leading actor in the Chinese-language film industry.[2][3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Other ventures 4 Personal life 5 Filmography5.1 Film 5.2 Television6 Awards and nominations 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Wu was born in Berkeley, California, and raised in Orinda, California. His parents, Diana, a college professor, and George Wu, a retired engineer,[4] are natives of Shanghai, China
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Cinema Of Hong Kong
The cinema of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(Chinese: 香港電影) is one of the three major threads in the history of Chinese language
Chinese language
cinema, alongside the cinema of China, and the cinema of Taiwan. As a former British colony, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
had a greater degree of political and economic freedom than mainland China and Taiwan, and developed into a filmmaking hub for the Chinese-speaking world (including its worldwide diaspora), and for East Asia
East Asia
in general. For decades, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
was the third largest motion picture industry in the world (after Indian cinema
Indian cinema
and Hollywood) and the second largest exporter
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Cinema Of China
The cinema of China
China
is one of three distinct historical threads of Chinese-language cinema together with the cinema of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and the cinema of Taiwan. Cinema was introduced in China
China
in 1896 and the first Chinese film, The Battle of Dingjunshan, was made in 1905, with the film industry being centered on Shanghai
Shanghai
in the first decades. The first sound film, Sing-Song Girl Red Peony, using the sound-on-disc technology, was made in 1931. The 1930s, considered the first "golden period" of Chinese cinema, saw the advent of the Leftist cinematic movement and the dispute between Nationalists and Communists was reflected in the films produced
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Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
Yuen Woo-ping
(Chinese: 袁和平; pinyin: Yuán Hépíng; born 1945) is a Chinese martial arts choreographer and film director, renowned as one of the most successful and influential figures in the world of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
action cinema. He is one of the inductees on the Avenue of Stars in Hong Kong. Yuen is also a son of Yuen Siu-tien, a renowned martial arts film actor.Contents1 Life and career 2 Filmography2.1 As director 2.2 Selected filmography as action choreographer/fight advisor 2.3 Actor3 Awards and nominations 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Yuen was born in Guangzhou, China. He achieved his first directing credit in 1978 on the seminal Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, starring Jackie Chan, followed quickly by Drunken Master
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Du Yuming
Du Yuming (Chinese: 杜聿明; pinyin: Dù Yùmíng; 1904–1981) was a Kuomintang
Kuomintang
field commander. He was a graduate of the first class of Whampoa Academy, took part in Chiang's Northern Expedition, and was active in southern China
China
and in the Burma theatre of the Sino-Japanese War. After the Japanese surrendered in 1945, he was an important commander in the Chinese Civil War. From 1945-47 Du commanded Nationalist forces in Northeast China
China
and won several important battles against Communist forces there, including defeating the Communist general Lin Biao
Lin Biao
twice at Siping. Despite his successes, Chiang relieved him from command in 1947, after which Communist forces quickly took control of the region. Du was captured later in the civil war and spent a decade as a prisoner of war
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Beijing
Beijing
Beijing
(/beɪˈdʒɪŋ/;[9] Mandarin: [pèi.tɕíŋ] ( listen)), formerly romanized as Peking,[10] is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city
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Wey (state)
Wei (/weɪ/;[1] Chinese: 衞; pinyin: Wèi; Old Chinese: *ɢʷat-s), commonly spelled Wey to distinguish from the larger Wei (魏) state, was an ancient Chinese state that was founded in the early Western Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
and rose to prominence during the Spring and Autumn period. Its rulers were of the surname Ji (姬), the same as that of the rulers of Zhou
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Wei (state)
Wei (/weɪ/;[1] Chinese: 魏; pinyin: Wèi; Old Chinese: *N-qʰuj-s) was an ancient Chinese state during the Warring States period. Its territory lay between the states of Qin and Qi and included parts of modern-day Henan, Hebei, Shanxi, and Shandong. After its capital was moved from Anyi to Daliang (present-day Kaifeng) during the reign of King Hui, Wei was also called Liang (Chinese: 梁; pinyin: Liáng).Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 Spring and Autumn period 1.3 Warring States Period 1.4 Defeat2 Rulers 3 Family tree of Wei rulers3.1 Famous people4 Legacy4.1 Chinese legend 4.2 Chinese astronomy5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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SINA.com
Sina (Chinese: 新浪; pinyin: Xīn Làng) is a Chinese technology company. Sina operates four major business lines: Sina Weibo, Sina Mobile, Sina Online, and Sinanet. Sina has over 100 million registered users worldwide. Sina was recognized by Southern Weekend
Southern Weekend
as the "China's Media of the Year" in 2003. Sina owns Sina Weibo, a Twitter-like microblog social network, which has 56.5 percent of the Chinese microblogging market based on active users and 86.6 percent based on browsing time over Chinese competitors such as Tencent
Tencent
and Baidu. The social networking service has more than 500 million users[4] and millions of posts per day, and is adding 20 million new users per month, says the company. The top 100 users now have over 180 million unique followers combined.[citation needed] It is the largest Chinese-language mobile portal. It is run by Sina Corporation, which was founded in 1999
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Warring States Period
The Warring States period
Warring States period
(Chinese: 戰國時代; pinyin: Zhànguó shídài) was an era in ancient Chinese history of intensive warfare all around China with the goal of creating one Chinese Empire, as well as bureaucratic and military reforms and consolidation, following the Spring and Autumn period
Spring and Autumn period
and concluding with the Qin wars of conquest that saw the annexation of all other contender states, which ultimately led to the Qin state's victory in 221 BC as the first unified Chinese empire
Chinese empire
known as the Qin dynasty. Although different scholars point toward different dates ranging from 481 BC to 403 BC as the true beginning of the Warring States, Sima Qian's choice of 475 BC is the most often cited
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Development Hell
Development hell or development limbo is media industry jargon for a project that remains in development (often moving between different crews, scripts, or studios) without progressing to completion. A film, video game, television program, screenplay, software application,[1] concept, or idea stranded in development hell takes an especially long time to start production, or never does. Projects in development hell are not officially cancelled, but work on them slows or stops.Contents1 Overview 2 Causes 3 Examples3.1 Films 3.2 Music 3.3 Video games4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Film
Film
industry companies often buy the film rights to many popular novels, video games, and comic books, but it may take years for such properties to be successfully brought to the cinema, and often with considerable changes to the plot, characters, and general tone
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Yunnan, China
Yunnan
Yunnan
is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the far southwest of the country. It spans approximately 394,000 square kilometres (152,000 sq mi) and has a population of 45.7 million (as of 2009). The capital of the province is Kunming, formerly also known as Yunnan. The province borders the Chinese provinces Guangxi, Guizhou, Sichuan, and the Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, and the countries Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar. Yunnan
Yunnan
is situated in a mountainous area, with high elevations in the northwest and low elevations in the southeast. Most of the population lives in the eastern part of the province. In the west, the altitude can vary from the mountain peaks to river valleys as much as 3,000 metres (9,800 ft). Yunnan
Yunnan
is rich in natural resources and has the largest diversity of plant life in China
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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