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List Of Vacuum Tubes
This is a list of vacuum tubes or thermionic valves, and low-pressure gas-filled tubes, or discharge tubes. Before the advent of semiconductor devices, thousands of tube types were used in consumer electronics. Many industrial, military or otherwise professional tubes were also produced
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Standard Telephones And Cables
Standard Telephones and Cables
Standard Telephones and Cables
Ltd (later STC plc) was a British telephone, telegraph, radio, telecommunications, and related equipment R&D manufacturer. During its history, STC invented and developed several groundbreaking new technologies including pulse code modulation (PCM) and optical fibres. The company was founded in 1883 in London
London
as International Western Electric by Western Electric, shortly after becoming the telephone equipment supplier for the Bell System
Bell System
in the United States. In 1925, Western Electric
Western Electric
divested itself of all foreign operations and general electric supply units, other than telephony, and sold International Western Electric
Western Electric
to International Telephone
Telephone
and Telegraph
Telegraph
(ITT)
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Phenolic Resin
Phenol
Phenol
formaldehyde resins (PF) or phenolic resins are synthetic polymers obtained by the reaction of phenol or substituted phenol with formaldehyde. Used as the basis for Bakelite, PFs were the first commercial synthetic resins (plastics). They have been widely used for the production of molded products including billiard balls, laboratory countertops, and as coatings and adhesives. They were at one time the primary material used for the production of circuit boards but have been largely replaced with epoxy resins and fiberglass cloth, as with fire-resistant FR-4 circuit board materials. There are two main production methods
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S Band
The S band
S band
is a designation by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for a part of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum covering frequencies from 2 to 4 gigahertz (GHz). Thus it crosses the conventional boundary between the UHF and SHF bands at 3.0 GHz. The S band
S band
is used by weather radar, surface ship radar, and some communications satellites, especially those used by NASA
NASA
to communicate with the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. The 10 cm radar short-band ranges roughly from 1.55 to 5.2 GHz
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Magnetron
The cavity magnetron is a high-powered vacuum tube that generates microwaves using the interaction of a stream of electrons with a magnetic field while moving past a series of open metal cavities (cavity resonators). Electrons
Electrons
pass by the openings to these cavities and cause radio waves to oscillate within, similar to the way a whistle produces a tone when excited by an air stream blown past its opening. The frequency of the microwaves produced, the resonant frequency, is determined by the cavities' physical dimensions. Unlike other vacuum tubes such as a klystron or a traveling-wave tube (TWT), the magnetron cannot function as an amplifier in order to increase the intensity of an applied microwave signal; the magnetron serves solely as an oscillator, generating a microwave signal from direct current electricity supplied to the vacuum tube. An early form of magnetron was invented by H
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X Band
The X band
X band
is the designation for a band of frequencies in the microwave radio region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In some cases, such as in communication engineering, the frequency range of the X band is rather indefinitely set at approximately 7.0 to 11.2 GHz[citation needed]. In radar engineering, the frequency range is specified by the IEEE
IEEE
at 8.0 to 12.0 GHz
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Klystron
A klystron is a specialized linear-beam vacuum tube, invented in 1937 by American electrical engineers Russell and Sigurd Varian,[1] which is used as an amplifier for high radio frequencies, from UHF up into the microwave range. Low-power klystrons are used as oscillators in terrestrial microwave relay communications links, while high-power klystrons are used as output tubes in UHF television transmitters, satellite communication, and radar transmitters, and to generate the drive power for modern particle accelerators. In a klystron, an electron beam interacts with radio waves as it passes through resonant cavities, metal boxes along the length of a tube.[2] The electron beam first passes through a cavity to which the input signal is applied. The energy of the electron beam amplifies the signal, and the amplified signal is taken from a cavity at the other end of the tube
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Orthicon
The video camera tube was a type of cathode ray tube used to capture the television image prior to the introduction of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) in the 1980s.[1][2][3] Several different types of tubes were in use from the early 1930s to the 1980s. In these tubes, the cathode ray was scanned across an image of the scene to be broadcast. The resultant current was dependent on the brightness of the image on the target
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Analog Television
Analog television
Analog television
or analogue television is the original television technology that uses analog signals to transmit video and audio.[1] In an analog television broadcast, the brightness, colors and sound are represented by rapid variations of either the amplitude, frequency or phase of the signal. Analog signals vary over a continuous range of possible values which means that electronic noise and interference becomes reproduced by the receiver. So with analog, a moderately weak signal becomes snowy and subject to interference. In contrast, a moderately weak digital signal and a very strong digital signal transmit equal picture quality. Analog television
Analog television
may be wireless or can be distributed over a cable network using cable converters. All broadcast television systems used analog signals before the arrival of digital television (DTV)
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866A
The 866 is a mercury vapor half-wave rectifier intended for high-voltage applications. The voltage drop is approximately 15 volts up to 150 Hz. To avoid unwanted shorts the tube must be operated in a vertical position and the filament preheated for at least 30 seconds before applying the plate voltage.Contents1 Construction 2 Operation 3 Pictures in working conditions 4 References 5 External linksConstruction[edit] Structurally, it consists of a linear electrode arrangement; a cup shaped anode with top cap and a cylindrical cathode. The socket is a medium 4 pin bayonet UX-4 and the glass envelope is ST-19. The 2.5 volt/ 5 Amp filament is connected to pins 1 and 4. Operation[edit] Under normal operating conditions the tube glows blue and mercury droplets are visible. Pictures in working conditions[edit]Westinghouse 866A mercury vapor half-wave rectifier tube. Glowing with 5mA Westinghouse 866A mercury vapor half-wave rectifier tube
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Root Mean Square
In statistics and its applications, the root mean square (abbreviated RMS or rms) is defined as the square root of the mean square (the arithmetic mean of the squares of a set of numbers).[1] The RMS is also known as the quadratic mean and is a particular case of the generalized mean with exponent 2
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Mica
The mica group of sheet silicate (phyllosilicate) minerals includes several closely related materials having nearly perfect basal cleavage. All are monoclinic, with a tendency towards pseudohexagonal crystals, and are similar in chemical composition
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Electronic Industries Alliance
The Electronic Industries Alliance
Electronic Industries Alliance
(EIA; until 1997 Electronic Industries Association) was a standards and trade organization composed as an alliance of trade associations for electronics manufacturers in the United States. They developed standards to ensure the equipment of different manufacturers was compatible and interchangeable. The EIA ceased operations on February 11, 2011, but the former sectors continue to serve the constituencies of EIA.[1]Contents1 History 2 EIA standards 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In 1924, United States-based radio manufacturers formed a trade group called the Associated Radio Manufacturers. Later that same year, the group renamed itself the Radio Manufacturers Association (RMA)
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Svetlana (company)
PJSC Svetlana (Russian: ПАО «Светлана») is a company based in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It is primarily involved in the research, design, and manufacturing of electronic and microelectronic instruments.[1] Svetlana is part of Ruselectronics.[2] The name of the company is said to originate from the words for 'light of an electric lamp' (СВЕТ ЛАмпочки НАкаливания).[3]Contents1 History 2 Products 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The company was established in 1889 as the Ya. M. Aivaz (Russian: Я. М. Айваз) Factory.[4] Svetlana was a major producer of vacuum tubes. In 1937, the Soviet Union purchased a tube assembly line from RCA, including production licenses and initial staff training, and installed it on the St Petersburg plant.[5] US-licensed tubes were produced since then. Since 2001, New Sensor Corp
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EIA Standards
Here is a list of Electronic Industries Alliance
Electronic Industries Alliance
(EIA) Standards. The EIA ceased operations on February 11, 2011, but the former sectors continue to serve the constituencies of EIA. EIA designated ECA to continue to develop standards for interconnect, passive and electro-mechanical (IP&E) electronic components under the ANSI-designation of EIA standards. All other electronic components standards are managed by their respective sectors. ECA is expected to merge with the National Electronic Distributors Association (NEDA) to form the Electronic Components Industry Association (ECIA). However, the EIA standards brand will continue for IP&E standards within ECIA
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Raytheon
The Raytheon
Raytheon
Company is a major U.S. defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in weapons and military and commercial electronics. It was previously involved in corporate and special-mission aircraft until early 2007. Raytheon
Raytheon
is the world's largest producer of guided missiles.[3] Established in 1922, the company reincorporated in 1928 and adopted its present name in 1959. As of 2014 the company had around 63,000 employees worldwide[4] and annual revenues of approximately US$25 billion
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