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List Of Transgender People
This list consists of many notable people who identify as transgender. The individual listings note the subject's nationality and main occupation. In many non-Western and ancient or medieval societies, transgender people are seen as a different gender in itself, and there is a separate category for them, one that is different from the binary 'men' and 'women'
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Koekchuch
Koekchuch is an extinct gender identity recorded among the Itelmens
Itelmens
of Siberia. These were male assigned at birth individuals who behaved as women did, and were recorded in the late 18th century and early 19th century. [1][2] References[edit]^ Pacific Homosexualities By Stephen O
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Muxe
In Zapotec cultures of Oaxaca
Oaxaca
(southern Mexico), a muxe (also spelled muxhe; [muʃeʔ]) is an assigned male at birth individual who dresses and behaves in ways otherwise associated with the female gender; they may be seen as a third gender.[1] Some marry women and have children while others choose men as sexual or romantic partners.[2] According to anthropologist Lynn Stephen, muxe "may do certain kinds of women’s work such as embroidery or decorating home altars, but others do the male work of making jewelry".[3][4] The word muxe is thought to derive from the Spanish word for "woman", mujer.[5] In the 16th-century, the letter x had
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Fakaleiti
A fakaleiti (or leiti or fakafefine or lady) is a Tongan male assigned at birth individual who behaves in a relatively effeminate manner. Although fakaleiti in Tonga
Tonga
do not necessarily associate with transgender or gay and lesbian identities in the Western world, those who grow up in Tongan migrant communities in New Zealand, Australia, and the United States may find a greater level of community and affinity to similar identities than fakaleiti in the island kingdom. The term fakaleiti (with a long i at the end) is made up of the prefix faka- (in the manner of) and the borrowing lady from English. Fakaleitis themselves prefer to call themselves leiti or ladies. Fakaleiti or fakafefine are similar to Samoan fa'afafine and Hawaiian mahu. See also[edit]Miss Galaxy Pageant List of transgender-related topicsReferences[edit]Besnier, Niko (1994). "Polynesian Gender
Gender
Liminality Through Time and Space"
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Mukhannathun
Mukhannathun (مخنثون "effeminate ones", "men who resemble women", singular mukhannath) is Classical Arabic, an ancient antecedent to the modern conception of transgender women, who, as time went on, were forced to be castrated. There has been significant mention of "mukhannathun" in ahadith and by scholars of Islam. Outside religious texts, they are strongly associated with music and entertainment.[1] Khanith
Khanith
is a vernacular Arabic term used in Oman
Oman
and the Arabian Peninsula to denote the gender role ascribed to males who function sexually, and in some ways socially, as women
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Calabai
The Bugis
Bugis
people are the most numerous of the three major ethnic groups of South Sulawesi, Indonesia.[1][page needed] In contrast to the two-gender system, Bugis
Bugis
society recognises five genders: makkunrai, oroané, bissu, calabai, and calalai.[2] Makkunrai and oroané are comparable to cisgender women and men, respectively. Bissu
Bissu
are androgynous shamans. Calalai and calabai are respectively approximately equivent to trans men and trans women.[2] In daily social life, the bissu, the calabai, and the calalai may enter the dwelling places and the villages of both men and women.[citation needed]Contents1 Bissu 2 Calabai 3 Calalai 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBissu[edit] The bissu belong to one of the five genders of the Bugis, an Indonesian ethnic group
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Bissu
The Bugis
Bugis
people are the most numerous of the three major ethnic groups of South Sulawesi, Indonesia.[1][page needed] In contrast to the two-gender system, Bugis
Bugis
society recognises five genders: makkunrai, oroané, bissu, calabai, and calalai.[2] Makkunrai and oroané are comparable to cisgender women and men, respectively. Bissu
Bissu
are androgynous shamans. Calalai and calabai are respectively approximately equivent to trans men and trans women.[2] In daily social life, the bissu, the calabai, and the calalai may enter the dwelling places and the villages of both men and women.[citation needed]Contents1 Bissu 2 Calabai 3 Calalai 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBissu[edit] The bissu belong to one of the five genders of the Bugis, an Indonesian ethnic group
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Bakla
In the Philippines, a baklâ (pronounced [bɐkˈlaʔ]) or bayot (Cebuano) is a person who was assigned male at birth and who is usually exclusively attracted to men. Baklâ are often considered a third gender.[1] Many, but not all, baklas have feminine mannerisms and dress as women.[2] Some self-identify as women. Bakla are socially and economically integrated into Filipino society.[citation needed] The stereotype of a baklâ is a parlorista–a flamboyant, camp cross-dresser who works in a beauty salon.[3] Some Filipinos disapprove of baklas, usually on religious grounds or related social reasons.Contents1 Legal status 2 Religion 3 Etymology 4 Gender 5 Culture5.1 Beauty pageants 5.2 Swardspeak6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLegal status[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Akava'ine
Akava'ine is a Cook Islands Māori word which has come, since the 2000s, to refer to transgender people of Māori descent from the Cook Islands. It is not an old custom but rather a contemporary identity almost solely influenced by other Polynesians, naturally, through cross-cultural interaction of Polynesians living in New Zealand, especially the Samoan "Fa'afafine", transgender people who hold a special place in Sāmoan society.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Other terms 3 Culture 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyEtymology[edit] Akava'ine
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Balkan Sworn Virgins
The Albanian sworn virgins
Albanian sworn virgins
(Albanian: burrnesha) are Albanian women who take a vow of chastity and wear male clothing in order to live as men in the patriarchal northern Albanian society
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Māhū
Māhū ('in the middle') in Kanaka Maoli
Kanaka Maoli
(Hawaiian) and Maohi (Tahitian) cultures are third gender persons with traditional spiritual and social roles within the culture, similar to Tongan fakaleiti and Samoan fa'afafine,[1] and analogous to the Neapolitan femminiello.[2][3] Notable māhū include kumu hula Hinaleimoana Kwai Kong Wong-Kalu, and performer Cocoa Chandelier.[4] See also[edit] Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu
Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu
- contemporary māhū, teacher and Hawaiian cultural worker Kumu Hina
Kumu Hina
(2014) - documentary film about Hinaleimoana Wong-KaluTwo-spirit, a similar concept in some indigenous North American communities LGBT rights in HawaiiReferences and sources[edit]This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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Travesti
In some cultures, most particularly in South America, a travesti is a person who has been assigned male at birth and who has a feminine, transfeminine or "femme" gender identity and is connected to a local socio-political identity. Travestis have been described as a third gender, but not all see themselves this way. By the mid-2010s, a majority of South American trans social movements and activism tend to acknowledge travesti as both a possible gender identity, and a possible socio-political identifier adopted by those who identify as women but were assigned male at birth
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Winkte
Winkte (also spelled wíŋtke) is the contraction of an old Lakota word, winyanktehca, meaning '[wants] to be like a woman'.[1] Historically, the winkte have been considered a social category of male-bodied people who adopt the clothing, work, and mannerisms that Lakota culture usually considers feminine.[1] In contemporary Lakota culture, winkte is usually used to refer to a homosexual man, whether or not that man is in other ways gender non-conforming. They may or may not consider themselves part of the more mainstream gay or transgender communities. Many modern winkte participate in the pan-Indian two-spirit community;[1] sometimes the direction to adopt this social and spiritual role comes in a series of dreams.[1] While historical accounts of their status vary, most accounts treated the winkte as regular members of the community, and not in any way marginalized for their status
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Maknyah
Mak nyah ([ˈmaʔ ˈɲa]), alternatively spelled maknyah, is a Malay vernacular[1] term for trans women in Malaysia
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Transgender Inequality
Transgender
Transgender
inequality is the unequal protection transgender people receive in work, school, and society in general. Transgender
Transgender
people regularly face transphobic harassment
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Two-Spirit
Two-Spirit
Two-Spirit
(also two spirit or, occasionally, twospirited) is a modern, pan-Indian, umbrella term used by some indigenous North Americans to describe certain people in their communities who fulfill a traditional third-gender (or other gender-variant) role in their cultures.[1][2][3] While most people mistakenly associate the term with " LGBT
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