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List Of Rivers Of China
This incomplete list of rivers that flow through China
China
is organized according to the body of water into which each river empties, beginning with the Sea of Okhotsk
Sea of Okhotsk
in the northeast, moving clockwise on a map and ending
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River
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Daling River
The Daling River (Chinese: 大凌河; pinyin: Dàlíng Hé) is a river in Northeast China. With a length of 435 kilometres (270 mi), it is the main river in the arid western part of Liaoning.[1] Its drainage basin covers 23,837 square kilometres (9,204 sq mi), 85% of which is located in Liaoning, 13% in Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
and the remaining 2% in Hebei.[2] Course[edit] The Daling River has two sources. The southern source is Shuiquan Creek (水泉沟) in the village of Wukunzhangzi (吴坤杖子) in Jianchang
Jianchang
County, Liaoning. The northern source is Quanzi Creek (泉子沟) in the village of Songyingzi (宋营子) in Pingquan, Hebei. The two source streams meet at Dachengzi, Kazuo County, Liaoning.[3] From there the river flows northeast past the city of Chaoyang into Baishi Reservoir, where it receives Mangniu River (牤牛河) from the north
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Hun River (Liao River Tributary)
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Bohai Sea
Coordinates: 38°42′N 119°54′E / 38.7°N 119.9°E / 38.7; 119.9Bohai SeaChinese 渤海TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Bó hǎiWade–Giles Po2 hai3IPA [pwǒ.xài]WuRomanization Poh平 hae平Yue: CantoneseYale Romanization Buht hóiJyutping But6 hoi2Southern MinTâi-lô Phu̍t háiThe location of the Bo Hai.The Bohai Sea
Sea
or Bo Sea, also known as Bohai Gulf, Bo Gulf or Pohai Bay (Chinese: 渤海; literally: "Bo Sea"), is the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea
Yellow Sea
and Korea Bay
Korea Bay
on the coast of Northeastern and North China. It is approximately 78,000 km2 (30,116 sq
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Zhang River
The Zhang River
Zhang River
is a river in China. The Zhang River
Zhang River
commences in Shanxi
Shanxi
Province and flows eastward. It then becomes the border of Hebei
Hebei
and Henan
Henan
Province west of Handan
Handan
and Anyang. A dam on the Zhang River
Zhang River
diverts water into the Red Flag Canal. History[edit] A bend in the Zhang was fortified in antiquity as the Zhao stronghold of Handan. The rebels' failure to secure it quickly enough was instrumental in Liu Bang's swift suppression of Chen Xi's revolt in 197 and 196 BC. References[edit]Coordinates: 36°28′33″N 115°17′12″E / 36.4759°N 115.2866°E / 36.4759; 115.2866This article related to a river in China
China
is a stub
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Sea Of Japan
The Sea of Japan
Japan
(see below for other names) is a marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and Russia. The Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea
Korea
(North and South) and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean.[1] This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean
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Hulun Lake
Hulun Lake
Hulun Lake
(simplified Chinese: 呼伦湖; traditional Chinese: 呼倫湖; pinyin: Hūlún Hú; Mongolian: hölön nuur Хөлөн нуур, lit. foot lake) or Dalai Lake (Mongolian: Dalai nuur Далай нуур, lit. ocean lake), is a large lake in the Inner Mongolia region of northern China.Contents1 Geography 2 Economy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] It is one of the five largest freshwater lakes in all of China, covering approximately 2,339 km². The lake is not far from Manzhouli, which is on a major passenger rail-line. Although there are several villages nearby, and Manzhouli is the nearest city of notable size.Amur BasinIn years with high precipitation, the normally exit−less endorheic lake may overflow at its northern shore, and the water will meet the Argun River (Ergune) after about 30 kilometres (19 mi)
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Wei River (Hebei)
Wei River (Hebei) is a river of China. It is part of the Bohai Sea basin. See also[edit]List of rivers in ChinaThis Chinese location article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to a river in China is a stub
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Gan River (Inner Mongolia)
Gan River or Gan He is a tributary of the Nen River in Inner Mongolia, China. It flows 446 km from the east flank of the Greater Khingan Range into the Nen River at Nenjiang, through the Morin Dawa Daur and the Oroqin Autonomous Banner of the vast Hulunbuir Municipality.[1] It drains an area of over 20,000 km2 of mostly hills and plains
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Ashi River
The Ashi River is a right tributary of the Songhua in eastern Manchuria,[1] located within Harbin's Acheng District
Acheng District
in the People's Republic of China.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 BibliographyName[edit] The river has borne the name "Ashi" since the Qing (17th–20th century).[1] Before that, it was known as the Anchuhu (Middle Chinese: ʔan-tsyhwit-xu), a medieval Chinese transcription of its original Jurchen name Anchun, Ancun, or Alcun,[n 1] meaning "Gold'" or "Golden", presumably from placer deposits along its banks.[1] History[edit] From the 2nd century BC to the 5th century AD, the river formed part of the Korean kingdom of Buyeo. The river was the home to Huining (now Acheng), the original settlement of the Wanyan
Wanyan
clan of the Jurchens
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Sea Of Okhotsk
The Sea
Sea
of Okhotsk
Okhotsk
(Russian: Охо́тское мо́ре, tr. Okhótskoye móre, IPA: [ɐˈxot͡skəjə ˈmorʲe]; Japanese: オホーツク海, translit. Ohōtsuku-kai) is a marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean,[1] between the Kamchatka Peninsula
Kamchatka Peninsula
on the east, the Kuril Islands
Kuril Islands
on the southeast, the island of Hokkaido
Hokkaido
to the south, the island of Sakhalin
Sakhalin
along the west, and a long stretch of eastern Siberian coast along the west and north. The northeast corner is the Shelikhov Gulf
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Arctic Ocean
The Arctic
Arctic
Ocean
Ocean
is the smallest and shallowest of the world's five major oceans.[1] The International Hydrographic Organization
International Hydrographic Organization
(IHO) recognizes it as an ocean, although some oceanographers call it the Arctic
Arctic
Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
or simply the Arctic
Arctic
Sea, classifying it a mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean.[2][3] It is also seen as the northernmost part of the all-encompassing World Ocean. Located mostly in the Arctic
Arctic
north polar region in the middle of the Northern Hemisphere, the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean
Ocean
is almost completely surrounded by Eurasia and North America. It is partly covered by sea ice throughout the year and almost completely in winter
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Songacha River
The Songacha or Sungacha River (Сунгача) (Chinese: 松阿察河; pinyin: Sōngàchá Hé) is a river marking part of the border between the Russian Federation and the People's Republic of China
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Muling River
Muling or Muren (simplified Chinese: 穆棱河; traditional Chinese: 穆稜河; pinyin: Mùlíng Hé) is a river in Northeast China, a left tributary of Ussuri River. Its length is 577 kilometres (359 mi), and its basin area is approximately 18,500 square kilometres (7,100 sq mi).[1] Jixi
Jixi
and Hulin
Hulin
are located on Muling River. The area of the river is known by Sino-Soviet conflict (1929)
Sino-Soviet conflict (1929)
and battles between Soviet and Kwantung Armies. Link[edit]穆棱河Notes[edit]^ GSE
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Yongding River
The Yongding River
Yongding River
(Chinese: 永定河; pinyin: Yǒngdìng Hé; Wade–Giles: Yungting He) is a river in northern China. It is one of the main tributaries in the Hai River
Hai River
system and is best known as the largest river to flow through Beijing Municipality. In recent year, the Beijing segment of the river has dried up due to environmental issues.[1] Beijing Municipality
Beijing Municipality
government has invested 16 billion yuan in effort to replace the riverbed with parkland or smaller bodies of water.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Geography 3 History 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The river was originally called Wuding River
Wuding River
(simplified Chinese: 无定河; traditional Chinese: 無定河; pinyin: Wúdìng Hé), literally "indefinite river" due to the fact that its flow was irregular
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