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List Of Plants Used In Indian Cuisine
South Asian cuisine
South Asian cuisine
encompasses a delectable variety of sub-cuisines and cooking styles that vary very widely, reflecting the diversity of the Indian subcontinent, even though there is a certain centrality to the general ingredients used. Terms used the recipes of varied Indian and other South Asian sub-cuisines sometimes tend to be multi-lingual and region-specific, mostly based on the author's specific sub-ethnicity, the popularity of a given vegetable/spice in a given sub-cuisine within South Asia, etc. Indian cuisine
Indian cuisine
is overwhelmingly vegetarian friendly and employs a variety of different fruits, vegetables, grains, and spices which vary in name from region to region within the country. Most Indian restaurants serve predominantly Punjabi/North Indian cuisine, while a limited few serve a very limited choice of some South Indian dishes like Dosa
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South Asian Cuisine
South Asian cuisine
Asian cuisine
includes the cuisines from South Asia
South Asia
(also known as the Indian subcontinent) comprising the traditional cuisines from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives and when included in the definition, also that of Afghanistan.Contents1 Staples and common ingredients 2 History 3 List of South Asian cuisines 4 ReferencesStaples and common ingredients[edit]An assortment of spices and herbs. Spices
Spices
are an indispensable food ingredient in much of India.Chapati, a type of flat bread from the former regions, is a common part of meals to be had in many parts of Indian subcontinent
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Rice
Rice
Rice
is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa
Oryza sativa
(Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima
Oryza glaberrima
(African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia
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Moong
The mung bean ( Vigna
Vigna
radiata), alternatively known as the moong bean, monggo, green gram, or mung[2] Sanskrit
Sanskrit
मुद्ग / mŪgd, is a plant species in the legume family.[3][4] The mung bean is mainly cultivated in Indian Subcontinent India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal. including China, Korea, South Asia
South Asia
and Southeast Asia
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Mung Bean
The mung bean ( Vigna
Vigna
radiata), alternatively known as the moong bean, monggo, green gram, or mung[2] Sanskrit
Sanskrit
मुद्ग / mŪgd, is a plant species in the legume family.[3][4] The mung bean is mainly cultivated in Indian Subcontinent India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal. including China, Korea, South Asia
South Asia
and Southeast Asia
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Sesame
Sesame
Sesame
(/ˈsɛsəmiː/; Sesamum
Sesamum
indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum, also called benne.[2] Numerous wild relatives occur in Africa
Africa
and a smaller number in India. It is widely naturalized in tropical regions around the world and is cultivated for its edible seeds, which grow in pods or "buns". The world harvested 6.2 million metric tonnes of sesame seeds in 2014, with Tanzania, India, and Sudan as the largest producers.[3] Sesame
Sesame
seed is one of the oldest oilseed crops known, domesticated well over 3000 years ago. Sesamum
Sesamum
has many other species, most being wild and native to sub-Saharan Africa
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Moth Bean
Phaseolus aconitifolius Jacq. Vigna
Vigna
aconitifolia is a drought-resistant legume, commonly grown in arid and semi-arid regions of India. It is commonly called mat bean, moth bean, matki, Turkish gram or dew bean. The pods, sprouts and protein rich seeds of this crop are commonly consumed in India. Moth bean can be grown on many soil types, and can also act as a pasture legume. Moth bean is an herbaceous creeping annual which grows to approximately 40 cm high
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Kidney Bean
The kidney bean is a variety of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It is named for its visual resemblance in shape and colour to a kidney
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Urad (bean)
Vigna
Vigna
mungo, black gram, urad bean, minapa pappu, mungo bean or black matpe bean (māṣa) is a bean grown in the Indian subcontinent. At one time it was considered to belong to the same species as the mung bean. The product sold as black lentil is usually the whole urad bean, whereas the split bean (the interior being white) is called white lentil. It should not to be confused with the much smaller true black lentil (Lens culinaris). Black gram originated in India, where it has been in cultivation from ancient times and is one of the most highly prized pulses of India
India
and Pakistan. It is very widely used in the Punjabi Cuisine and is often referred to as "maah di daal" in the native language by Punjabis. The Coastal Andhra
Coastal Andhra
region in Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
is famous for black gram after paddy
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Pea
The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum
Pisum
sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Pea
Pea
pods are botanically fruit,[2] since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae
Fabaceae
such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus. P. sativum is an annual plant, with a life cycle of one year. It is a cool-season crop grown in many parts of the world; planting can take place from winter to early summer depending on location
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Maize
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Corn
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Zea Mays
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Oryza Sativa
Oryza
Oryza
sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the plant species most commonly referred to in English as rice. Oryza
Oryza
sativa is a grass with a genome consisting of 430Mb across 12 chromosomes. It is renowned for being easy to genetically modify, and is a model organism for cereal biology.Contents1 Classification 2 Nomenclature and taxonomy 3 History of domestication and cultivation3.1 Origins 3.2 Continental East Asia 3.3 South Asia 3.4 Korean peninsula and Japanese archipelago 3.5 Southeast Asia4 See also 5 References 6 External linksClassification[edit] Oryza
Oryza
sativa contains two major subspecies: the sticky, short-grained japonica or sinica variety, and the nonsticky, long-grained indica variety
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Black-eyed Pea
The black-eyed pea, black-eyed bean or goat pea, a legume, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown around the world for its medium-sized, edible bean. The common commercial variety is called the California Blackeye; it is pale-colored with a prominent black spot. In the American South there are countless varieties, many of them heirloom, that vary in size from the small lady peas to very large ones, as may be seen in the state and municipal farmers' markets. The color of the eye may be black, brown, red, pink or green. All the peas are green when freshly shelled and brown or buff when dried. A popular variation of the black-eyed pea is the purple hull pea; it is usually green with a prominent purple or pink spot. The currently accepted botanical name for the black-eyed pea is Vigna
Vigna
unguiculata subsp. unguiculata, although previously it was classified in the genus Phaseolus. Vigna
Vigna
unguiculata subsp
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Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
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